contemporary art – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 00:09:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://harpmaker.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png contemporary art – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ 32 32 A Contemporary Artist — Greek City Times https://harpmaker.net/a-contemporary-artist-greek-city-times/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 23:08:01 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/a-contemporary-artist-greek-city-times/ Marcelo Ricardo Zeballos is a contemporary artist. He was born in Argentina. He studied at the University of Buenos Aires at the Faculty of Architecture. He started his artistic career in 1997. His painting arrives as a new form of poetic beauty and has an impact on intellectual circles. The works show the ideal woman, […]]]>

Marcelo Ricardo Zeballos is a contemporary artist. He was born in Argentina. He studied at the University of Buenos Aires at the Faculty of Architecture. He started his artistic career in 1997.

His painting arrives as a new form of poetic beauty and has an impact on intellectual circles.

The works show the ideal woman, autonomous, complete and independent. The empty spaces of her fabrics radiate light and sunshine, and their natural surroundings, the scents of flowers.

The blue of the sea goes hand in hand with her palette, and the ideology of the feminine manages to anchor itself.

In these paintings, one should not look for the imprint left by the hair of the brush, nor the fury of the rapid stroke, nor the spontaneous expression.

His painting is rational, with an orderly, neat, impeccably executed composition.

They are the result of two elements: aesthetics and concept. Similar to the world of graphic design, the language is very popular and understandable, figurative, with strong contrast and synthesis. And, in the balance between whites and blacks, the saturated and vibrant primaries also participate.

To speak with Zeballos is to understand his work. What he says, he says again, painting.

There they are: women. In their own spaces. Walk in a park. Purchases. Sharing friendship and relaxation.

Great close-ups of beautiful faces, like in the movies, medium shots, full silhouettes and fashion accessories are symbols of this.

Here, frivolity is present as a virtue, and the dose of sensuality and eroticism is the strategy of an explicit message at recreation.

For more information:

Instagram: @mzeballos1

Web: www.marcelozaballos.com.ar

Engineer: @vassiliosvitsilogiannis

Read also Ron Moss: Beyond the bold and the beautiful

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Van Cleef & Arpels launches its Dance Reflections festival https://harpmaker.net/van-cleef-arpels-launches-its-dance-reflections-festival/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 16:13:25 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/van-cleef-arpels-launches-its-dance-reflections-festival/ Van Cleef & Arpels is no stranger to the world of dance. The French jewelry house’s passion for movement dates back to the 1920s, when the brand’s co-founder, Louis Arpels, took pleasure in taking his nephew to the Opéra Garnier. Later, in the 1940s, the house developed its jeweled ballerina clips and, in 1967, inspired […]]]>

Van Cleef & Arpels is no stranger to the world of dance. The French jewelry house’s passion for movement dates back to the 1920s, when the brand’s co-founder, Louis Arpels, took pleasure in taking his nephew to the Opéra Garnier. Later, in the 1940s, the house developed its jeweled ballerina clips and, in 1967, inspired George Balanchine to create Jewelrywhich has been credited as the first complete abstract ballet.

More recently, Van Cleef & Arpels has supported dance artists, companies and institutions around the world, including Benjamin Millepied’s LA Dance Project, the Royal Opera House in London, the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow and the Australian Ballet. , and even created in 2015 FEDORA, an annual prize for choreographic creation.

The brand is now launching Dance Reflections, an annual festival that will be held in different cities around the world. The first edition, which will take place in London from March 9 to 23, offers a diverse program that includes major contemporary works from the history of dance, such as To dance by Lucinda Childs, Trisha Brown Set and resetand beach birds for Camera by Merce Cunningham, as well as more recent pieces by Alessandro Sciarroni, Boris Charmatz, SERAFINE1369 and Gisèle Vienne.

by Gisèle Vienne This is how you will disappear. Photo by Seldon Hunt, Courtesy Van Cleef & Arpels

According to Serge Laurent, head of dance and cultural programming at Van Cleef & Arpels, the curatorial approach of Dance Reflections is based on three values ​​that he discovered while researching the history of the brand: creativity, transmission and education. “They correspond so well to the field of dance,” he said in a telephone interview from Paris. “Dance is obviously a creative discipline, and Van Cleef & Arpels is a creative house. Transmission is also extremely important for dance and branding, as both must transmit a repertoire and know-how respectively. Finally, education is the best way to engage in dialogue with diverse audiences.

Considering that Van Cleef & Arpels has mainly supported classical ballet companies until now, the focus on works by experimental practitioners represents a change. “Van Cleef & Arpels are steeped in tradition, but if you look at their collections, you also see that many of their pieces work with contemporary approaches and pure abstraction”, explains Laurent, drawing a parallel with the fact that many many dancers are trained in classical. forms before moving towards modern styles. “That’s why I wanted to present existing and new works within the framework of the festival: to show that the contemporary does not come out of nowhere. There is always continuity and references to the past.

The rapprochement between the classical and the avant-garde was also a motivating factor in the choice of partners for Dance Reflections: the festival has teamed up with the Royal Opera House, Sadler’s Wells and Tate Modern, each presenting its own part of the program. While working with Sadler’s seemed natural, and the partnership with the Tate aims to highlight the role museums play in preserving dance history, Laurent admits he was initially “a little shy” at first. idea of ​​approaching the Royal Opera House. “It’s such a temple,” he said. “But I was amazed at how curious they were about new and contemporary ideas, and how eager they were to present them to their audience. Although their main duty is to preserve the classical repertoire, they also do a lot to renew it. Showing contemporary works in traditional venues can also give them credibility with an audience that “sometimes wonders if contemporary art is really serious.”

Two men wearing simple black t-shirts are shown from the waist down.  Their elbows and forearms touch as they fold their hands over their shoulders.  Their outer arms flare out in a curved V-shape as they lean into each other.
Brigel Gjoka and Rauf “Rubberlegz” Yasit’s Neighbors will be presented at Sadler’s Wells as part of Dance Reflections. Photo by Ursula Kaufmann, Courtesy Van Cleef & Arpels

Conceptualized before the pandemic and originally slated for 2020, Dance Reflections arguably gained prominence thanks to its postponement. When asked what the festival means for the dance community, Sir Alistair Spalding, CBE, the artistic director of Sadler’s Wells, pointed out that the whole dance industry has taken a big financial hit, but that support from Van Cleef & Arpels has enabled Sadler’s Wells to continue strong international programming and support artists through commissions. “When we announced our participation in the Dance Reflections program, I received many emails asking me: ‘How can you do this after the time we have just been through?’ he says. “The simple answer is that we couldn’t have done it without the support of Van Cleef & Arpels.”

The fact that the first Dance Reflections festival is taking place in post-Brexit London – which has been chosen as the first host city for Van Cleef & Arpels to introduce well-known French artists to a new audience – is also moving. “With what has happened to the UK politically, it is very important that we clarify that London is still part of a world that includes our neighbors in France, Germany and Belgium, all the people who have made a lot of the work we present is possible,” adds Spalding. “This festival feels like a statement of intent to keep our borders open, even if it’s a little harder now to keep international exchanges going.”

What does Van Cleef & Arpels hope their ardent support of the dance industry will bring them? “Dance Reflections is not tied to any specific collection or any other commercial venture. Van Cleef & Arpels really wants to share its passion for dance, and maybe use it as a way for people who wouldn’t otherwise be curious about the brand to discover its universe through the prism of art,” explains Lawrence.

There will hopefully be much more opportunity for this discovery process, as Laurent is already working to build a global network of partners, including the Brooklyn Academy of Music in New York and New York University in Abu Dhabi. Future festivals, however, may differ from the London edition. “England, like most countries in Europe, is very centralized. It was only natural to hold the festival in one city,” he says. “If we go to America or Asia, it wouldn’t make sense. We would probably present fewer artists and we would move to several places. Only time will tell what awaits us.

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Magritte sets record with $79.7 million sale at Sotheby’s https://harpmaker.net/magritte-sets-record-with-79-7-million-sale-at-sothebys/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 23:40:53 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/magritte-sets-record-with-79-7-million-sale-at-sothebys/ One of Rene Magritte’s famous ‘Empire of Light’ paintings sold on Wednesday for 59.4 million pounds with fees, or about $79.7 million, nearly three times the high auction price for a work by the Belgian surrealist artist. Certain to fetch at least $60 million thanks to a guaranteed minimum price financed by Sotheby’s, the 1961 […]]]>

One of Rene Magritte’s famous ‘Empire of Light’ paintings sold on Wednesday for 59.4 million pounds with fees, or about $79.7 million, nearly three times the high auction price for a work by the Belgian surrealist artist. Certain to fetch at least $60 million thanks to a guaranteed minimum price financed by Sotheby’s, the 1961 painting was solicited by three bidders, all represented by Sotheby’s specialists by telephone in London.

The painting, “The Empire of Lights,” which juxtaposes a nighttime lamplit street with a serene daylit sky, is one of the most famous and enigmatic images in 20th-century art. Magritte painted no less than 17 canvases on the theme of day and night from 1948.

The Sotheby’s variant, one of the most recent and largest, was made for Anne-Marie Gillion Crowet, the daughter of Magritte’s friend, patron and chess opponent, Pierre Crowet. It had remained in the same family collection ever since.

“Over the years, many versions have been sold and they have done extremely well,” said Melanie Clore, co-founder of London-based art consultancy Clore Wyndham.

She said that in terms of composition, scale and condition, this 1961 work was “one of the most desirable Magritte paintings to come to auction”.

In 2011, while Clore was working as a specialist in impressionist and modern art at Sotheby’s, his department auctioned off a 1953 version for $3.8 million, although at the time it was not among the highest prices obtained for the artist.

The Magritte was the obvious lot in London’s spring auction series this week, dedicated to big-ticket Impressionist, modern and contemporary art. But high-end sales like these at the European headquarters of Sotheby’s, Christie’s and Phillips’s aren’t what they once were.

With Britain’s economy weakened by Brexit and China a more powerful force in the global art market, London was the third best-selling auction center in 2021, behind New York and Hong Kong, according to Pi-eX , a London-based company that analyzes international auctions.

London’s hybrid live and online “evening” sales now take place in the afternoon, straddling the world’s time zones, and Impressionist and contemporary artworks are no longer auctioned days different. Bonnard is confused with Basquiat and Banksy.

“It’s a new world,” said Parisian dealer Christian Ogier, who regularly attends these London auctions. “Blending modern and contemporary is understandable. Why not? I do not stop at any category.

But London, with its huge concentrations of international wealth, including Kremlin-linked Russian oligarchs (which the UK government is now trying to restrict and regulate), continues to be a magnet for trophy buyers and sellers. of renowned art.

In addition to the Magritte, the Sotheby’s sale also included a Monet “Nymphéas”, or water lily canvas, painted in 1914-17, which had not been seen at auction since 1978. Entering a Japanese collection, it fetched 31 .2 million, again bought by a telephone bidder.

On Tuesday evening, Christie’s offered “The Foxes”, a fresh-from-the-market masterpiece by German expressionist painter Franz Marc, to headline its spring sales in London.

Recently returned to the heirs of Berlin collectors Kurt and Else Grawi, ‘The Foxes’ (1913) was one of Marc’s most powerful Cubist-influenced animal studies. (The artist admired them more than humans.)

Guaranteed for at least $47 million, it was pushed by three telephone bidders to $57.2 million, the highest price at Christie’s sale and a record for the artist at auction.

Francis Bacon’s seemingly impressive “Triptych 1986-7” has been similarly estimated and guaranteed. But Bacon’s later paintings are much less sought after than his earlier works, and the work fell to a single auction of $51.6 million, the ninth-highest auction price for the significant artist.

Around 90% of Christie’s lots found buyers, but Banksy’s ‘Happy Choppers’, a tongue-in-cheek stencil painting of helicopter gunships sporting Minnie Mouse bows, failed to sell against a low estimate of 4 million of dollars.

Tuesday night sales at Christie’s brought in $298 million; the Wednesday night modern and contemporary works auction at Sotheby’s, preceded by “The Now,” brought in $297.2 million. This combined total of $595 million was 39 percent less than the $971 million made at the equivalent sales in London in February 2014, when art sales were at a high, according to Pi-eX.

The paintings of young market favorites attracted the most intense competition. Following a lethargic 90-minute sale of 20 contemporary works broadcast live from Shanghai to inaugurate the company’s new offices and galleries in mainland China, Christie’s has launched its main ’20/21′ sale featuring works by Jade Fadojutimi, Shara Hughes , Amoako Boafo and Flora Ioukhnovitch. “You’re Gonna Make Me Blush,” a 2017 painting by Yukhnovich inspired by Fragonard’s “The Swing,” fetched $2.6 million from a low estimate of $340,000.

The same names shone at Sotheby’s ‘The Now’ sale of 21 lots of works by hot contemporary artists. Shara Hughes’ 2019 psychedelic floral painting ‘The Naked Lady’ sold for a record $2.7 million, and a 2020 work by Yukhnovich, ‘Warm, Wet N’ Wild’, soared to 3 .6 million, establishing a highly sought-after auction. British artist. It had been estimated that it would sell for $200,000.

Last year, works by artists under 40 fetched a record $450 million at auction. This represented a 275% increase from 2020, with 8,952 works in the category on offer, also a record, according to Artprice, a France-based company that tracks results from international auction houses.

“It’s dangerous,” said Samuel Selby, 21, a London-based contemporary coin collector. “I worry about how auction houses take works by young artists and sell them for ridiculous prices.”

“It will be difficult to sustain in the long term,” added Selby.

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Art Review: Pat Boas at Oregon Contemporary https://harpmaker.net/art-review-pat-boas-at-oregon-contemporary/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 18:58:08 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/art-review-pat-boas-at-oregon-contemporary/ I can’t remember what social media platform I was on when I first saw Pat Boas’ installation of wallpapers and paintings. The work is at Oregon Contemporary as part of the exhibition “Hallie Ford Fellows in the Visual Arts 2017 -2019”. Yet the moment I saw the abstract patterned wallpaper paired with the two small […]]]>

I can’t remember what social media platform I was on when I first saw Pat Boas’ installation of wallpapers and paintings. The work is at Oregon Contemporary as part of the exhibition “Hallie Ford Fellows in the Visual Arts 2017 -2019”. Yet the moment I saw the abstract patterned wallpaper paired with the two small abstract paintings on my screen, I knew I wanted to write about his contribution.

That said, I hesitated.

First, it’s notoriously difficult to write about group shows because there’s the implicit command to write about a prescribed general theme. Additionally, length constraints imposed by a publisher may necessitate that ratings of individual artists’ works remain rather cursory, thus poorly reflecting both artist and writer. There is also the potential problem of writing about the work of a particular artist to the exclusion of others in a group exhibition. If the writer decides to focus on a number of artists less than the total of those in the exhibition, there could be a slight perception. (As I’ve written about several artists in the show before, rest assured, no affront is meant. It’s just that I was struck by Boas’ installation.)

Pat Boas, wallpaper installation view, Bliksem (2021), with paintings Sentinel (Window) (left) and good listener (law). Photo courtesy of Mario Gallucci

Second, writing about abstract art can be daunting, perhaps because the references drawn from the work are quite abstract on their own. Descriptors derive from oblique formal concerns or color theory, which can lead to quite a pedantic reading, which can suck the life out of the artwork. Yet equally problematic is an attempt to portray a strong emotional response from said writer about the art. The first approach seems to be objective in the extreme, and the second seems too subjective. Never mind that abstract art often escapes meaning (as in a literal understanding).

Of course, these difficulties did not prevent writers from trying to convey their impressions, nor did they prevent viewers from enjoying this art. After all, abstraction has been around for over a century now. We should feel a little comfortable with that. It’s still good when the artist herself gives us a work that is a pleasure to contemplate.

Pat Boas’ installation spans a wall 11′ high and 20′ wide, and consists of wallpaper titled Bliksem (the Dutch word for lightning) that spans the entire wall, plus two 20″ x 16″ paintings that are spaced 92″ apart. Standing well back from the wall, the dominant color of the wallpaper appears to be a purple, or possibly a violet. Upon closer examination, there are also significant amounts of aquamarine and light green. The pink and yellow lines serve to outline much of the larger color blocking.

I’m sent back to my grandparents’ house where I enjoyed appreciating the symmetry and mirroring of the repeated patterns in their 1950s fiberglass curtains. The effect here is similar, except the Boas wall vibrates and, like high voltage, crackles and buzzes. It crawls, glides and hypnotizes. This dynamism helps to enter the “logic”, or rather the strategy, of the overall installation, so much so that I do not consider the wallpaper and the paintings as separate from each other, but rather as parts of a cooperative whole.

Sponsor

White Bird Ballet Newmark Theater Alonzo King Portland Oregon

Focusing on the wallpaper, purple or purple seems to dominate. Yet by shifting the emphasis to one (or both) of the paintings, the purple recedes in favor of the yellow. This “color bounce” certainly adds to the interest, as depending on the focus, the paintings either stand out or sink into the wall. Fixed like eyes on the face of the wall, they shatter that busy plane, but also have the potential to get lost in its patterns. The paintings are like the controls on some giant oscilloscope, but instead of turning what would be the rectangular knobs to activate the patterns, all one has to do is shift one’s gaze from concentrating on the paintings to the entire wall, then back to the paintings.

Pat Boas, Sentinel (Window) (2021). Acrylic and Flashe on linen on panel. Photo by Mario Gallucci.

We assume that the table on the left, Sentinel (Window), draws the parenthesized portion of its title from the rectangular frame that sits in the outer edges of the table. Yet the frame appears to rest on the painting below, minus a frame and more a painted border above the rest of the painting. The series of bumps on its outer edge are reminiscent of the frame one would find around an older mirror, an impression perhaps aided by the wavy yellow lines that begin to suggest the outline of a head with a rosy forehead up with a chalky white neck. Is this the Sentinel? I ask because in the middle of this portrait there is a vanishing point, thus also suggesting a landscape. Perhaps a clue can be found in the harlequin pattern, which makes me wonder if Boas, like a jester, is having a little fun with the viewer. Also note the tension between the solid colors and the rear paint, which is then enhanced with watery yellows and darker greens. The gray, somewhat horizontal lines just below the midpoint provide some stability, like trusses against an implosion.

The other table, good listener, is in my opinion hilarious, as it rather seems to portray quite the opposite, meaning that the varied and busy parts of the painting give the impression of someone with a lot on their mind who might indeed need some someone with a listening ear. The yellow, black, and beige grid graphic runs wild along the falling boulder-like shapes. Again, the harlequin motif may suggest that a joke is again at play here, or even the perception of a Shakespearian fool where the reality is quite the opposite. Curiously, however, rather than resting on the harlequin pattern as some kind of commentary on the other elements, for a break my eye pulls back to the little green bar in the top right corner.

Pat Boas, good listener (2021). Acrylic and Flashe on linen on panel. Photo by Mario Gallucci.

When I’m ready, I take a step back and let the set redo its work, which, when I think about it, has been my relationship with Pat Boas’ work since we first crossed paths there. ten or twelve years ago. back. There are some interesting concepts behind her art, as well as an execution that rewards time spent with her work, which is perhaps why she’s increasingly getting the attention she deserves.

***

Note: The exhibition at Oregon Contemporary is the second iteration of this group exhibition of these particular Hallie Ford Fellows. The first exhibition took place at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon. Both were organized by Los Angeles curator and author Jenelle Porter (who, oddly enough, was also a lawyer for the Hallie Ford Family Foundation’s 2020 awards cycle). For the Schnitzer exhibition, Boas presented quite different work (as did a number of other artists), which did not involve wallpaper. However, this is the second time Boas has exhibited wallpaper as part of his installation, the first being in 2021 for Facts, not words at the Sun Valley Museum of Art, Ketchum, ID.


The Oregon Center for Contemporary Art is located at 8371 North Interstate Avenue and is open Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. The exhibition “Hallie Ford Fellows in the Visual Arts 2017-2019” is open until March 20.


Patrick Collier is an artist who has written for the Midwest magazine “The New Art Examiner”, as well as for the online journals UltraPDX and PORT. He holds a BA in Philosophy and an MA in English Literature from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, as well as an MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Before moving to Oregon in 2003, Collier and his wife operated the Chicago gallery in good faith for but not financial success. They live in Corvallis.


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Award-winning works from the Joffrey Academy return to the Museum of Contemporary Art and feature four world premieres https://harpmaker.net/award-winning-works-from-the-joffrey-academy-return-to-the-museum-of-contemporary-art-and-feature-four-world-premieres/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 23:38:16 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/award-winning-works-from-the-joffrey-academy-return-to-the-museum-of-contemporary-art-and-feature-four-world-premieres/ The Joffrey Academy of Dance, official school of the Joffrey Ballet, presents four world premieres following Joffrey’s national call for ALAANA artists (African, Latino, Asian, Arab and Native American) to submit applications for the choreographic competition of the Joffrey Academy winning works. . The winners of this year’s competition – Audrey Baran, Joffrey Company artist […]]]>

The Joffrey Academy of Dance, official school of the Joffrey Ballet, presents four world premieres following Joffrey’s national call for ALAANA artists (African, Latino, Asian, Arab and Native American) to submit applications for the choreographic competition of the Joffrey Academy winning works. .

The winners of this year’s competition – Audrey Baran, Joffrey Company artist Edson Barbosa, Taylor Carrasco and Derick McKoy, Jr. – each choreographed an original work created on Joffrey Academy trainees and the Studio Company.

“Following the COVID-related cancellation in 2020 and a virtual presentation in 2021, it is particularly significant that Winning Works returns in all its glory to the Museum of Contemporary Art in 2022,” said Ashley Wheater MBE, The Mary B. Galvin Artistic Director of the Joffrey Ballet. “These young, emerging choreographers prove that there is no limit to the level of artistic expression one can possess.”

“This represents over a decade of exceptional work and brilliant artistry for Winning Works,” said Greg Cameron, President and CEO of Joffrey Ballet. “I am in awe of the creativity showcased over the past two challenging years which has demonstrated admirable tenacity among artists. May we celebrate this return to the MCA as a new beginning.”

Director of Joffrey’s Abbott Academy, Raymond Rodriguez, added: “There is nothing more rewarding than seeing the works of rising stars danced by our amazing Joffrey Academy trainees and our Studio Company. Just like our beautiful Chicago, the backgrounds of these choreographers and the works they’ll premiere on stage are varied, rich and dynamic.”

Winning Works returns to in-person performances for the first time since 2019 at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago Edlis Neeson Theater (220 E. Chicago Avenue) Friday, March 18 at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, March 19 at 2:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Sunday, March 20 at 2:00 p.m. Tickets to Winning Works are $30 and are available for purchase at joffrey.org/winningworks.

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City Life Org – Meriem Bennani to create new public artwork for the High Line, New York, co-commissioned by High Line Art and Audemars Piguet Contemporary https://harpmaker.net/city-life-org-meriem-bennani-to-create-new-public-artwork-for-the-high-line-new-york-co-commissioned-by-high-line-art-and-audemars-piguet-contemporary/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 21:37:19 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/city-life-org-meriem-bennani-to-create-new-public-artwork-for-the-high-line-new-york-co-commissioned-by-high-line-art-and-audemars-piguet-contemporary/ Artist portrait by Farah Al Qasimi, 2022. © Courtesy of the artist, the High Line and Audemars Piguet The artist’s first public sculpture will premiere on the High Line in June as part of the 2022-2023 High Line Commissions In June, artist Meriem Bennani will unveil her first public sculpture, Windy (2022), co-commissioned by High […]]]>

Artist portrait by Farah Al Qasimi, 2022. © Courtesy of the artist, the High Line and Audemars Piguet

The artist’s first public sculpture will premiere on the High Line in June as part of the 2022-2023 High Line Commissions

In June, artist Meriem Bennani will unveil her first public sculpture, Windy (2022), co-commissioned by High Line Art and Audemars Piguet Contemporary. Installed on the High Line at 24th Street in New York, the sculpture will be on view until May 2023. Windy marks the first time that High Line Art and Audemars Piguet Contemporary have co-curated and commissioned a public sculpture.

Fusing magical realism, wacky humor and techniques from a wide range of moving image genres, Bennani creates videos – often housed in colorful geometric steel sculptures – that tell stories about human behavior and our experiences both online and offline. 2 Lizards (2020), the artist’s most recent video series created at the start of COVID-19 in collaboration with filmmaker Orian Barki, became an overnight viral sensation as the work poignantly captured the experiences of quarantine and extreme isolation caused by the pandemic.

Windy on the High Line will showcase a shift in Bennani’s practice, marking her first public sculpture and her first free-standing sculpture that does not include a video element. Inspired directly by the experience of being in New York City and walking the High Line, Windy will retain the artist’s signature absurdist humor and interest in animation while focusing on mechanics and kinetic energy. of the sculpture itself.

Curators from High Line Art and Audemars Piguet Contemporary are working closely with Bennani to develop the work. The collaboration highlights the parallel mission of each program: to invite an artist to commission a new work that challenges them to think creatively and further develop their practice.

Meriem Bennani, artist, says: “In developing the concept for Windy, I knew it couldn’t be a static sculpture, but had to echo the dynamic and constant movements of the High Line. I wanted to play with the energy of New York after the last two years that alternated between engaging in it and carefully hiding from it. I also wanted to try something that presented me with new conceptual and technical challenges to expand my understanding of sculpture, the moving image, and the creative possibilities of their shared interaction. I am grateful for the support of High Line Art and Audemars Piguet Contemporary and for this opportunity to give my work a new direction, on the occasion of my first public sculpture.

Cecile Alemani, Donald R. Mullen, Jr. Director & Chief Curator, High Line Art, says, “It’s such an exciting time to see Meriem Bennani, an artist who engages in contemporary culture with an incisive spirit, expand her practice to new forms. This collaboration with Audemars Piguet Contemporary expands the unique platform that the High Line offers artists to present new creative works to a wide audience.

Audrey Teichman, curator at Audemars Piguet Contemporary, said: “High Line Art raises awareness among the general public about artists working today, which is entirely in line with Audemars Piguet Contemporary’s commitment to supporting artists and fostering their development. creative. We are thrilled, alongside Cecilia and her team, to collaborate with Meriem in her hometown of New York on a sculpture that takes her work from the digital sphere into the public realm and represents a new chapter in her artistic practice. We are delighted that visitors to the High Line will experience this dynamic and unique work in person.

About Meriem Bennani
Meriem Bennani (born in 1988 in Rabat, Morocco) is an artist based in New York. In 2022, in addition to Windy, she will present solo exhibitions at the Renaissance Society, Chicago, Illinois (2022); and Nottingham Contemporary, Nottingham, England (2022). She has already had solo exhibitions at the Julia Stoschek Collection, Berlin, Germany (2020); Louis Vuitton Foundation, Paris, France (2019); The Kitchen, New York, New York (2017); and MoMA PS1, New York, New York (2016). Her work has been featured in group exhibitions at institutions such as LAX, Los Angeles, CA (2020); Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Denmark (2020); and MAXXI National Museum of Arts XXI, Rome, Italy (2018). She has participated in major international exhibitions including the Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York (2019), Biennial of Moving Image, Turin, Italy (2019); Center for Contemporary Art, Geneva, Switzerland (2018); Biennale of Rennes, France (2018); and 11th Shanghai Biennale, China (2016).

About High Line Art
Founded in 2009, High Line Art commissions and produces a wide range of artwork, including site-specific commissions, exhibitions, performances, video programs and a series of billboard interventions. . Led by Cecilia Alemani, Director and Chief Curator of Donald R. Mullen, Jr. of High Line Art, and presented by High Line, the arts program invites artists to think about creative ways to engage with architecture, unique history and design. of the park and to foster a productive dialogue with the surrounding neighborhood and urban landscape.

For more information on High Line Art, please visit thehighline.org/art.

About the High Line
The High Line is both a non-profit organization and a public park located on the West Side of Manhattan. Through his work with communities on and off the High Line, he is dedicated to reinventing public spaces to create connected and healthy neighborhoods and cities.

Built on an elevated historic rail line, the High Line was always meant to be more than a park. Visitors can stroll the gardens, view artwork, watch a performance, enjoy food or drink, or connect with friends and neighbors, all while enjoying a unique perspective of New York City .

Nearly 100% of the High Line’s annual budget comes from donations. The High Line is owned by the City of New York and operated under a license agreement with NYC Parks.

For more information, visit thehighline.org and follow us on Facebook, TwitterInstagram.

About Audemars Piguet Contemporary
Audemars Piguet Contemporary commissions international artists to create contemporary works of art, fostering a global community of creators. The brand believes in the power of contemporary art to connect and be connected. Its patronage echoes the community of talented craftsmen that the Manufacture has supported and nurtured in the Vallée de Joux.

The team accompanies every commissioning process from inception to development to exhibition and builds experiences for audiences to engage with the work across the globe. The resulting works belong to the artists and contribute to their body of work.

As with mechanical watches, commissioned artwork is not limited to what you see. These works are sensitive to our ever-changing world. They are an opportunity for new creation, bring audiences together and spark conversations that go beyond first impressions.

Since 2012, Audemars Piguet Contemporary has maintained exchanges with artists from around the world including Aleksandra Domanović, Cao Fei, Kurt Hentschläger, Dan Holdsworth, Phoebe Hui, Ryoji Ikeda, Lars Jan, Theo Jansen, Alexandre Joly, Kolkoz, Robin Meier, Quayola, Cheng Ran, Arin Rungjang, Tomás Saraceno, Semiconductor, Jana Winderen and Sun Xun. Commissioned works have been presented around the world, in major venues such as Art Basel (of which Audemars Piguet has been an associate partner since 2013) in Hong Kong, Basel, Miami Beach; the Venice Biennale; Times Square, New York; Palace of Tokyo, Paris; HeK (House of Electronic Arts), Basel; Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg; UCCA, Beijing; MAXXI, Rome; and Ars Electronica, Linz.

For more information, visit audemarspiguet.com/com/en/about/audemars-piguetcontemporary.html.

About Audemars Piguet
Audemars Piguet is the oldest fine watchmaking manufacture still in the hands of its founding families (Audemars and Piguet). Based in Le Brassus since 1875, the company has trained generations of talented artisans who have continually developed new skills and techniques, expanding their know-how to create revolutionary trends. In the Vallée de Joux, in the heart of the Swiss Jura, Audemars Piguet has created numerous masterpieces, testimonies to the ancestral know-how and avant-garde spirit of the Manufacture. Sharing its passion and know-how with watch enthusiasts around the world through the language of emotions, Audemars Piguet has established enriching exchanges between the fields of creative practices and nurtured an inspired community. Born in Le Brassus, raised all over the world. For more information, visit audemarspiguet.com and follow us on Facebook, TwitterInstagram.

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Catalina Lozano named chief curator – Announcements https://harpmaker.net/catalina-lozano-named-chief-curator-announcements/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 05:19:09 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/catalina-lozano-named-chief-curator-announcements/ Catalina Lozano named chief curator Artium Museoa, Museum of Contemporary Art of the Basque Country France Kaléa, 24 years old 01002 Gasteiz ArabicSpain The Museum of Contemporary Art of the Basque Country is pleased to announce the appointment of Catalina Lozano as Chief Curator, in close collaboration with the Collections Department and the Museum Director. […]]]>

Catalina Lozano named chief curator

Artium Museoa, Museum of Contemporary Art of the Basque Country

France Kaléa, 24 years old

01002 Gasteiz Arabic
Spain

The Museum of Contemporary Art of the Basque Country is pleased to announce the appointment of Catalina Lozano as Chief Curator, in close collaboration with the Collections Department and the Museum Director.

Catalina Lozano (Bogotá, 1979) has worked extensively in the development of contemporary art projects internationally as an independent and institutional curator. She was most recently Director of Latin America Programs at KADIST (2020-22) and Associate Curator at the Museo Jumex in México (2017-2019). Lozano has organized monographic exhibitions dedicated to artists such as Mariana Castillo Deball, Santiago Borja, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz or Fernanda Gomes, among others. His projects have been presented in places such as Pivô, São Paulo; University Museum of Contemporary Art MUAC Museo Jumex and Casa del Lago, in Mexico City; Modern Art Museum of Medellin; Gasworks and Freud Museum, London; CRAC Alsace and CAPC Bordeaux. She is co-curator of the Mexican pavilion at the 2022 Venice Biennale.

Catalina Lozano joins the Museum the year that marks the institution’s 20th anniversary. This year’s program opens with A place of reflection: experimental art schools and educational practices in the Basque Country, 1957-1979an exhibition organized by Mikel Onandia, Rocio Robles Tardio and Sergio Rubira which recovers several educational projects that aimed to create experimental models in the period under review. A set of initiatives whose common denominator was to activate a “place of reflection” as a space of possibilities rather than following a formal or official education. The exhibition is co-produced with the Jorge Oteiza Museum Foundation.

The relationship between experimental educational projects and artistic practice is one of the areas of work of the Museum, of which JAI is a part.Institute of artistic practices, a study program that functions as a space for the exchange and dissemination of artistic methodologies with a committee formed by the artists Ibon Aranberri, Asier Mendizabal, Itziar Okariz alongside Catalina Lozano and Oier Etxeberria. This program is co-organized with CICC Tabakalera in San Sebastian.

April sees the opening of the exhibition The voice of the valley dedicated to Erlea Maneros Zabala (Bilbao, 1977) which brings together works produced by the artist over the past five years, as well as an exhibition-investigation of Anna Daucíkova (Bratislava, 1950) titled Not belonging to and in solidarity with, in which his recent production is linked to historical works. The project includes the participation of the artist Zbynek Baladran.

In June, the museum presents with the Reina Sofia National Center of Art Museum a vast exhibition entitled The periphery of PLCs dedicated to the work of Néstor Sanmiguel Diest (Zaragoza, 1949), covering forty years of artistic practice. The project will be divided into two simultaneous locations in Madrid and the Basque Country.

Since 2020, the Artium Museoa has been developing a program dedicated to the convergence between filmic languages ​​and the visual arts organized by curator Garbiñe Ortega. This year’s program includes exhibition projects from: Aura Satz (Barcelona, ​​1974), Ainara Elgoibar (1975), Ephraim Asili (1979) and Edurne Rubio (Burgos, 1974).

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Iggy Pop and the Ensemble Intercontemporain win the Polar Music Prize https://harpmaker.net/iggy-pop-and-the-ensemble-intercontemporain-win-the-polar-music-prize/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 10:38:16 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/iggy-pop-and-the-ensemble-intercontemporain-win-the-polar-music-prize/ STOCKHOLM – American rocker Iggy Pop, known as “the godfather of punk”, and the Ensemble Intercontemporain, a contemporary music orchestra based in Paris, have won the Polar Music Prize 2022, a Swedish music prize. The jury said on Tuesday that rock icon Iggy Pop, a singer and songwriter whose real name is James Newell Osterberg, […]]]>

STOCKHOLM – American rocker Iggy Pop, known as “the godfather of punk”, and the Ensemble Intercontemporain, a contemporary music orchestra based in Paris, have won the Polar Music Prize 2022, a Swedish music prize.

The jury said on Tuesday that rock icon Iggy Pop, a singer and songwriter whose real name is James Newell Osterberg, has “created furious rock music by blending blues and free jazz influences with the roar of the Michigan auto industry”.

Iggy Pop, 74, is often considered one of the founding fathers of punk rock with his band The Stooges, which started in the late 1960s. The jury said he paved the way for the emergence of punk and post-punk and that he was a role model for bands like the Sex Pistols and the Ramones.

The Ensemble Intercontemporain was founded in 1976 by composer Pierre Boulez. The ensemble focuses on contemporary art music and has become known for exploring new musical fields and artistic expressions such as dance, theater and technology.

A d

The orchestra of 31 soloists has been cited by the jury as “the Stradivarius of modern music and has inspired the greatest composers of our time to create new masterpieces since the 1970s”.

The Polar Music Prize, comprising a cash prize of 1 million Swedish kronor ($110,000) each, is awarded annually to individuals, groups and institutions in recognition of outstanding musical achievement.

It was founded in 1989 by the late Stig Anderson, a Swedish publisher, lyricist and ABBA manager, who established the Polar Music label.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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From a cosmetics entrepreneur to a seasoned cultural adviser, meet five under-the-radar Saudi art collectors https://harpmaker.net/from-a-cosmetics-entrepreneur-to-a-seasoned-cultural-adviser-meet-five-under-the-radar-saudi-art-collectors/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 06:30:41 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/from-a-cosmetics-entrepreneur-to-a-seasoned-cultural-adviser-meet-five-under-the-radar-saudi-art-collectors/ A cultural revolution is underway in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Until September 2019, when the first tourist visas were issued, the Gulf nation was closed to the world and access to the interior of the country was restricted to certain foreigners and by invitation only. Suddenly, the world was able to visit the often […]]]>

A cultural revolution is underway in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Until September 2019, when the first tourist visas were issued, the Gulf nation was closed to the world and access to the interior of the country was restricted to certain foreigners and by invitation only. Suddenly, the world was able to visit the often dubbed “Magic Kingdom” and see its rich ancient and contemporary heritage. Its opening is part of the country’s national transformation program, Saudi Vision 2030, launched in 2016 by Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman. Since then, change has come and gone: women can now drive, and there are movie theaters, music concerts and gigantic big projects to propel Saudi Arabia into the 21st century and beyond. Next year, the country will celebrate its centenary.

While there has long been an arts scene in Saudi Arabia propelled by private initiatives and artist-led groups and spaces, the new vision has instituted a top-down approach to the development of the cultural scene through numerous government initiatives, aided by the creation of the Saudi Ministry of Culture in June 2018.

There are countless Saudi artists in the realm of established, mid-career and emerging artists, but Saudi art collectors are few. These rare collectors are invested in developing the scene and hope to use their passion for art to make their country’s talent heard abroad. By sharing their collections and their love for art, these collectors hope to encourage other Saudis, young and old, to join their mission.

Basma Al-Sulaiman

Basma Al-Sulaiman.

Age: 61 years old

Occupation: Philanthropist, patron and founder of a virtual museum BASMOCA

What’s in the collection: “I started collecting in the 90s; my first acquisition was a Hockney. I then turned to Chinese artists and soon after started collecting both locally and internationally,” Al Sulaimain said of his mostly contemporary art collection.

Today, the collection spans different mediums, including painting, tapestry, photography, sculpture, video, and works on paper, and can be understood into two segments. One focuses on Saudi artists with just over 200 pieces, including commissioned works by Dana Awartani and Maha Malluh, works by Manal Al Dowayan, as well as landmark installations such as the iconic Black Arch on display in the first Saudi pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2011, and Ahmed Mater’s ode to Mecca, “Magnetism.” The other is an international collection comprising around 800 pieces by various artists ranging from Andy Warhol, Georg Baselitz and Bridget Riley to El Anatsui, Zhang Fanzhi and Joana Vasconcelos. She also started a virtual collection in 2011 with pieces by Jenny Holzer and Bill Viola, among others.

Distinguishing factor: “The collection was originally based on a passion that I had developed. The one I wanted to pass on to my son. However, he sadly passed away a few years ago and since then converting the collection into a heirloom in his memory has become an obsession or a mission,” Al Sulaiman said. “An important aspect has become a dialogue between my home country, Saudi Arabia, and the rest of the world.” An exhibition showcasing highlights from Al Sulaiman’s Saudi art collection, dedicated to his son, will be on display at the Maraya in AlUla in February.

Where she shops: Local galleries like Athr and Hafez and international galleries White Cube, Thaddaeus Ropac and Victoria Miro. Fairs include Art Basel in Switzerland and Hong Kong as well as Arco (he has a residence in Madrid), and auctions at Christie’s, Sotheby’s and Bonhams.

Recent purchases: An important work by Ahmed Mater from Christie’s in support of The Future is Unwritten, Healing Arts Initiative.

Fun fact: Al Sulaiman began collecting virtual works and NFTs long before they were fashionable, and founded his virtual museum in 2011. “I never imagined being ahead of a curve that has now become a standard in the art world!” she said.

Sara Alrashid

Sara Alrashid.  Photo by Aljohara Al-Athel.

Sara Alrashid. Photo by Aljohara Al-Athel.

Occupation: After working in design at 1508 London, Alrashid returned to Saudi Arabia where she ran events company Gexpo with her two sisters. During the pandemic, she decided to start a cosmetics business.

What’s in the collection: Large scale paintings by international female artists or female subjects. This includes the work of Elizabeth Peyton, Ella Kruglyanskaya, France-Lise McGurn, Anne Collier, Tracey Emin and Shahzia Sikander. “Although I don’t have a lot of Saudi art in my collection, I’m more interested now in exploring the scene and acquiring works by Saudi artists,” Alrashid said.

Distinguishing factor: A focus on female artists and female subjects on canvas. “I still notice how there is a lack of female artists and that some of the highest paid artists are still male, so by collecting female art I am supporting female artists internationally,” said she declared.

Where she shops: Mainly major art fairs, especially Art Basel and Frieze. She also buys from galleries and auctions at Sotheby’s and Christie’s. During Covid, she made many online purchases from galleries.

Recent purchases: dark tears by Tracy Emin, Shepherdess by Louise Sartor and an untitled work by Issy Wood.

Fun fact: After buying several works at Art Basel this year, Alrashid created an annex villa in his garden to hang his works. Painted pink and called “the dollhouse”, it’s now her favorite place to entertain friends, host dinner parties and hang out.

Sultan bin Fahad

Sultan bin Fahad.

Sultan bin Fahad. Photo by Sueraya Shaheen.

Occupation: Artist, patron and cultural advisor

What’s in the collection: Major works of modern and contemporary art, including works by international and Middle Eastern artists, such as Sterling Ruby, Oscar Niemeyer, Michael Heizer, Daniel Arsham and Ahmed Mater, Ayman Yossri Daydban and Dia Azzawi.

Bin Fahad also collects found objects, which he uses in his own artistic practice, as well as archaeological pieces, design and eclectic objects such as the film script for The Godfather.

Distinguishing factor: “I collect what is dear to me and never think about reselling or retailing these items,” Bin Fahad said. “As an artist, the medium with which I have chosen to work is found objects, which I also collect, precisely because there are many stories to be told through them. I don’t think people need to collect paintings or sculptures for it to be art – I think a gas pump is also a work of art.

Where he shops: Mainly directly from the artist or the gallery. Bin Fahad said he used to buy at auctions and art fairs, but rarely buys at fairs now because he is “overwhelmed” with the choice.

Recent purchases: Works by Saudi artists Zahrah Al Ghamdi and Rashed AlShashai.

Fun fact: Bin Fahad has a growing collection of rubber ducks in a variety of shapes and colors.

Hamza Serafi

Hamza Serafi.

Hamza Serafi.

Age: 62

Occupation: Co-founder of Athr Gallery (Jeddah and Riyadh), one of Saudi Arabia’s leading commercial art galleries. Serafi is also a businessman and the vice president of Al-Salehat Holding Company, active in real estate, construction, project management, banking and healthcare. He also sits on the board of Makkah Construction Company and Saudi Catering and Hotels Holding, among other advisory roles for social and educational initiatives.

What’s in the collection: Mostly Saudi artists from the 1960s to the present day as well as a few pan-Arab and international artists, including Abdulhalim Radwi, Taha Al-Saban, Bakur Shakhoun, Abdullah Hamas, Ayman Yossri Daydban, Ahmed Mater, Nasser Al Salem and Dana Awartani.

Distinguishing factor: “Art is subjective. I collect art that I love and that means something to me, but above all, art that tells a story,” Serafi said. “I believe that part of the mission of contemporary art is to document the present moment and its various social problems.”

Where he shops: Art fairs like Art Dubai, Frieze and Art Basel, galleries and charity auctions.

Recent purchases: Artwork by Faisal Samra, Muhannad Shono and Saleh Khattab.

Fun fact: Serafi believes that works of art are like humans and seek out the places where they belong. “I don’t change my hanging if I see that a work likes its place,” he says.

Hind Al Ghanim

Hind Al Ghanim

Hind Al Ghanim.

Age: 39

Occupation: Entrepreneur who operates several points of sale, including a concept store, a café and a restaurant.

What’s in the collection: Works range from calligraphy to pop art, and cross-sectional lines include international art, Saudi, Egyptian and Islamic art. Works by Ahmed Mater, Abdulnasser Gharem, Ali Cha’aban, Fahad Almajhadi, Fahad Alneama, Jeff Koons, Afshin Pirhashemi and Damien Hirst.

Distinguishing factor: “I believe in art that I can invest in and if you feel the need to sell or trade it later,” she said. “I now focus on contemporary Saudi and local Middle Eastern art. I see a lot of potential in Saudi art for international growth, so I want to support them and my homeland.

Where she shops: Usually at auction at Sotheby’s and Christie’s (although she got her hard-to-get piece Ahmed Mater from Ayyam Gallery). It also buys directly from artists.

Recent purchases: Works by Saudi artists Fahad Almajhadi and Fahad Alneama.

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CAC reopens after closing due to COVID surge https://harpmaker.net/cac-reopens-after-closing-due-to-covid-surge/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 15:10:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/cac-reopens-after-closing-due-to-covid-surge/ CINCINNATI — The Center for Contemporary Art reopened Friday with a new timed entry system. What do you want to know The CAC has been closed since January 4 due to an increase in COVID-19 cases When the museum reopened on Friday, it did so using a timed reservation system Guests are given a two-hour […]]]>

CINCINNATI — The Center for Contemporary Art reopened Friday with a new timed entry system.


What do you want to know

  • The CAC has been closed since January 4 due to an increase in COVID-19 cases
  • When the museum reopened on Friday, it did so using a timed reservation system
  • Guests are given a two-hour window and have one hour and 45 minutes to visit the space; the last five minutes are reserved for staff to disinfect surfaces
  • The museum said it was “aware” of the situation and was doing what was necessary to ensure people could still “discover art” safely.

Customers must register for a free ticket online. There, they can select a start time and a two-hour window to enjoy the Downtown Cincinnati Museum.

During timed ticketing, visitors will have one hour and 45 minutes to tour the gallery spaces. The last 15 minutes of the time slot are reserved for security to sanitize and clean surfaces. Masks are mandatory.

“While we are aware of the number of COVID-19 cases in our region, we believe it is important that people can still experience art,” said Marcus Margerum, Acting Director of the ACC. .

The museum and gallery space closed on January 4 due to a recent local increase in COVID-19 cases. The CAC said it was doing this to “support the safety of the community and its staff”.

Meanwhile, Fausto, the CAC lobby restaurant, remained open during its normal business hours Monday through Friday, 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

“We offer timed tickets with the aim of creating a safe environment for our customers and frontline staff,” Margerum said. “Time slots will give visitors the time they need to view our exhibits and allow time for our security staff to disinfect and clean surfaces before the next guests arrive.”

While at the CAC, visitors can see The Regional, the first major multi-museum survey of contemporary artists based in the Midwest. It features new and recent work, including several site-specific commissions, by approximately 25 artists working across painting, photography, installation and performance.

The artists come from a variety of backgrounds and are currently based in Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Madison, Wisc., Minneapolis, and Saint Louis. Of course, there’s also art from Cincinnati-based creators.

Regular CAC appointments are Wednesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The galleries are closed on Monday and Tuesday.

For more information, visit contemporaryartscenter.org.


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