Novel – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 16:42:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://harpmaker.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Novel – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ 32 32 New Soft Robotic Droplet Handler for Cleaning Hazardous Liquids https://harpmaker.net/new-soft-robotic-droplet-handler-for-cleaning-hazardous-liquids/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 16:35:49 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/new-soft-robotic-droplet-handler-for-cleaning-hazardous-liquids/ Conventional robots are made up of heavy, rigid and expensive components, which makes them poorly suited for certain tasks. On the other hand, soft robots can be lightweight, offer a soft feel, and can be produced at a fraction of the cost of their stiff cousins. Today, a research team from Colorado State University (CSU) […]]]>

Conventional robots are made up of heavy, rigid and expensive components, which makes them poorly suited for certain tasks. On the other hand, soft robots can be lightweight, offer a soft feel, and can be produced at a fraction of the cost of their stiff cousins.

Today, a research team from Colorado State University (CSU) has created the first flexible robotic gripper capable of manipulating individual droplets of liquid. The manipulators are designed by integrating temperature-sensitive soft actuators with superomniphobic surfaces.

Powered by electric activation artificial muscle, the flexible robotic manipulator is made of inexpensive materials like nylon fibers and tape. The combination can be used to produce lightweight, inexpensive grippers capable of delicate work but 100 times stronger than human muscle for the same weight.

“A single clamp as big as my finger weighs one or two grams, including the built-in artificial muscle. And it’s inexpensive – just a dollar or two,” said Jiefeng Sun, postdoctoral fellow at the Mechanical Engineering Department’s Adaptive Robotics Laboratory and co-first author of the paper.

The flexible robotic grippers are treated with a new superomniphobic coating that makes droplet manipulator possible. The coating resists wetting by almost all types of liquids, even in dynamic situations where the mating surfaces tilt or move. The superomniphobic coating allows the gentle robotic manipulator to interact with the droplets without breaking their surface tension. So that it can grab, transport and release individual droplets as if they were flexible solids.

In many liquid spill scenarios, human cleanup can be hazardous due to toxicity, risk of contagion, or other hazards in the environment. These droplet manipulators are inexpensive enough to be disposable, yet capable enough to do precise, lossless liquid cleaning work that no other robot has ever done.

Researchers imagine that their biofluid handlers will not only reduce manual operations and minimize exposure to infectious agents, but will also pave the way for the development of low-cost, simple, and portable robotic systems, which can enable point-of-care operations, especially in developing countries.

Journal reference:

  1. Wei Wang, Jiefeng Sun, Sravanthi Vallabhuneni, Benjamin Pawlowski, Hamed Vahabi, Kimberly Nellenbach, Ashley C. Brown, Frank Scholle, Jianguo Zhao, and Arun K. Kota. Handling on demand, remotely and without loss of biofluid droplets. Materials Horizons (2022). DO I: 10.1039/D2MH00695B
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The Sunken Wreck of a Novel: A Review of Cormac McCarthy’s The Passenger https://harpmaker.net/the-sunken-wreck-of-a-novel-a-review-of-cormac-mccarthys-the-passenger/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 20:16:33 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/the-sunken-wreck-of-a-novel-a-review-of-cormac-mccarthys-the-passenger/ Is Cormac McCarthy one of the last generation of novelists to possess a Style? Of course, all writers have a characteristic style, however modest; but few these days have a grand style, the kind that Kingsley Amis (I think I wrote about Nabokov) described as a high level of flutter and wow. There are conversations […]]]>

Is Cormac McCarthy one of the last generation of novelists to possess a Style? Of course, all writers have a characteristic style, however modest; but few these days have a grand style, the kind that Kingsley Amis (I think I wrote about Nabokov) described as a high level of flutter and wow.

There are conversations about what I consider to be the “science of novelists”, which is not really meant to be understood

The great beasts of American literature have often aimed for prose that could not be confused with anyone else’s – Hemingway, Faulkner, Bellow, Updike. Although there were always intensely-mannered novelists in England, they had less of a heroically manly quality – Firbank, Wodehouse, Elizabeth Bowen, Henry Green. There are certainly novelists at work now with a fine command of style, like Peter Carey or Colson Whitehead, but few for whom style is everything, and most, like McCarthy, get by a bit.

Amis proposed an amusing critical game thinking about authors of this genre: write a sentence that they could never write. Her example was the impossibility for Ivy Compton-Burnett to write: “That’s a pretty dress you’re wearing. With McCarthy, the game is simpler. It’s almost impossible to imagine him writing the word “however.”

Its clauses are hammered out with brutal simplicity, and its invariable choice of conjunction is simply “and”. The things of the world pile up agglutinatively, piling up but hardly ever changing with a single “but,” or seeing how actions and facts affect what follows. The result has an irresistible and ferocious power; it is often compared to the prose of the Bible, or to Faulkner. To an English reader it bears an unexpected similarity to Henry Green in his most mannered style, the incantatory style that CM Doughty Deserted Arabia introduced. Much of this incantation is about scenes of hideous and senseless violence, as in the following passage from blood meridian:

The white man looked up, drunk, and the black one came forward and all of a sudden knocked his head off. Two thick dark blood and two thin cords rose like serpents from the stump of his neck and arced hissing in the fire. The head rolled to the left and stopped at the feet of the ex-priest where it lay with dismayed eyes. Tobin jerked his foot away, stood up, and stepped back. The fire smoked and blackened, and a gray cloud of smoke rose, and the columnar arches of blood slowly subsided until only the neck was gently bubbling like stew, and then that too subsided.

McCarthy’s antique Olivetti typewriter sold at auction in 2009 and fetched $254,500. I don’t wonder. I can’t imagine a more physical embodiment of a literary style: a machine where every key had to be pressed hard.

Style, like all styles, has its limits. In a series of highly acclaimed novels by blood meridian From there, McCarthy wrote about humanity at its most extreme, from the near-genocidal killing spree as America swept west in the 1850s, the anarchic improvisations chronicled in The border trilogy and a lavishly gruesome recreation of a Chaucer fable about money and death in There is no country for old people. His themes of unfettered manhood and violence, and his flippant expressions about race in particular, would cause serious trouble to any new American writer (“They were followed by packs of wolves, coyotes, Indians”). Nonetheless, McCarthy seems to be loved by more liberal readers, who, as far as I can tell, haven’t even complained about his use of the N-word. Sometimes that takes some ingenuity. The road takes place in an America after what is quite clearly a nuclear attack – “a long shear of light then a series of faint concussions” results in a relentless falling of dust. It has been repeatedly and bizarrely recast as a description of the possible effects of climate change. McCarthy is an extraordinarily simple and straightforward writer, but his impact on readers doesn’t come in simple forms.

His latest work, the first in a very long time, is an oddity: a sequence of two novels (a duology, I suppose). I will say right away that the second novel, Stella Maris, is a disaster. These are just sessions between one of the characters and a psychiatrist from the hospital. It’s a very bad idea to have a character analyzed in detail by a professional, the equivalent of the beginning novelist’s device of having a character stop in front of a mirror and describe their appearance. He adds very little to the first volume, and has the unfortunate effect of focusing his doubts. I will suggest putting Stella Maris completely aside.

The passenger has a pretty well-worn thriller premise. A commercial diver, Bobby Western, is sent to investigate a plane that has crashed at sea. He finds seven passengers and two crew members. (The Submarine Company inspires a repeat of a familiar McCarthy nightmare image, rising to Captain White’s head in a mescal jar in blood meridian, “hair flowing and eyes looking up in a pale face”.) There were, however, expected to be eight passengers. Back on land, the officials arrive. Soon, Western finds that state forces seem intent on placing him under arrest, with his assets seized by the IRS and imprisonment a real possibility. His dive buddy is killed in an unnecessary accident. Western goes on the run. But who was the eighth passenger?

At the same time, and only functioning as a periodically useful tool Deus Ex machine, is Bobby’s deceased sister, Alicia. He was a genius; it is suspected that she and Bobby were sexually related. She was also mad. Between the chapters of Bobby’s story, there are episodes of Alicia’s psychosis. She is visited by a band of hallucinated beings, led by a grotesque called the Kid. McCarthy’s dedication to using the most offensive language about minorities is paying off. These chapters are sour and repulsive, as the voice describes the Kid’s thalidomide-formed body: “Except of course they weren’t really hands.” Just flippers. Kind of like a seal. Other grotesques appear later, including a pair of “black-faced minstrels” saying “Yassuh yassuh”. They are quite fun in small doses. I rather enjoyed it when Alicia, after being subjected to electroconvulsive therapy, is visited by a blackened, burned, angry child – but small doses aren’t what we get.

The novel moves forward and blossoms into more general catastrophes, redeemed only by the continued power of this incantatory manner. The father of westerns, it seems, was in charge of working on the atomic bombs dropped on Japan. This revelation has some effects on the novel, none very admirable. A paragraph about the horrors of Hiroshima seems systematically added (“burning people crawled among the corpses like a horror in a vast crematorium”). There are conversations about what I’ve come to think of as “novelist science”, which isn’t really meant to be understood: “Many people thought that the S-matrix theory was a reasonable theory Promising, even. It’s just been replaced by chromodynamics. Alicia comes across as a child prodigy of a very routine kind – she’s a mathematician and a violin virtuoso (of course), recognized, at 13, as a World expert on baroque luthiers Couldn’t one of these fictional prodigies be really good at the bassoon for once?

A skilled editor might have cut out some of the grosser nonsense, like a diversion from the Kennedy assassination plots, unrelated to anything else. And there are surprisingly banal exchanges:

Make two, he said. Two what. Burgers. He takes a cheeseburger. OK. Cheeseburger. Sure. All? Yeah. Fries? Fries.

But here we are approaching a dangerous zone for the editor, as off-topic, time-wasting material seemingly unrelated to theme, plot, or argument provides tracts of compelling fluency.

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The glory of this novel comes from a succession of scenes in bars. Old drinking buddies who have nothing to do with Josh and tease and tell long polite tales to their half-drunk familiars: Long John, a traveling bar thesaurus (a guy as old as Pistol, Falstaff’s pal), Darling Dave, Seals, Bianca Pharaon and Debussy Fields, the wonderfully self-proclaimed transgender woman who has a thing for Bobby. The characters are beautifully realized, as good as VS Pritchett, and the reader feels a tender regret at John’s ending that is never a possibility in Alicia’s tragedy.

In these chapters, we glimpse a much more powerful and moving novel – one that, without the trappings of conspiracy and last-minute disaster rescues (in other words, the plot), brings the mysteries of the age, decay, death and missed opportunities for love developed through the rambling, drunken conversations overheard in a seedy bar. Like too many American novelists, McCarthy was deluded by the belief that he had to say something important. He should have thought that what lives forever is Miss Bates on Box Hill at Emma, or the anonymous young man in Our common friend who, trying to practice his French, says ‘Esker…?’, never to reappear. Debussy Fields could have been among the immortals. Now she’s sinking with a great wreckage of a book that talks over and over again about string theory, which killed Kennedy and everyone else. A waste of great talent.

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Graphic novel ‘Einstein’ balances his science and his life https://harpmaker.net/graphic-novel-einstein-balances-his-science-and-his-life/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 08:21:06 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/graphic-novel-einstein-balances-his-science-and-his-life/ I bet you would recognize a photo of Albert Einstein, with his wild hair and messy clothes. And you probably know that he discovered the equation E=mc2, even if you don’t know what it means. But those things aren’t even the most interesting aspects of one of the greatest scientists who ever lived. To fill […]]]>

I bet you would recognize a photo of Albert Einstein, with his wild hair and messy clothes. And you probably know that he discovered the equation E=mc2, even if you don’t know what it means. But those things aren’t even the most interesting aspects of one of the greatest scientists who ever lived. To fill us in on the rest, here’s the original graphic novel, Einstein.

At around 300 pages long, the graphic novel biography is now available through the First Second publisher. Einstein is written by Jim Ottaviani, author of #1 New York Times Bestseller Feynman, another graphic novel biography of a famous physicist. Art is by Jerel Dye with colors by Alison Acton.


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In fact, Ottaviani writes at the start of the afterword that the graphic novel is “not so much a biography of Albert Einstein as a story about him.” And so it reads like one long, cinematic narrative covering all the groundbreaking figure’s major moments and groundbreaking scientific theories.

Courtesy of First Second

Dye’s art style reminds me of Sunday morning comics, with a recognizable cartoon version of Einstein and many other famous scientists, plus a celebrity or two.

More importantly, it does a tremendous job of recreating the clothing, styles, architecture, and settings of the period between Einstein’s birth in 1879 and his death in 1955. Encompassing the end of the Industrial Revolution and both world wars, the reader sees central Europe as it was in the early 1900s, along with America after World War II.

The reader witnesses the poor living conditions of Einstein’s childhood family as well as the poverty of the average German household between the world wars, but we also see the luxury of his celebrity status and well-paid academic positions in his last years. Everything illustrated has obviously been carefully researched, but so has everything in the book.

Graphic novel 'Einstein' balances his science and his life
Courtesy of First Second

As a physicist myself, I was very interested in seeing how the graphic novel would use its visual form to depict the groundbreaking theories discovered by Einstein. Most of Einstein’s theories are incredibly complex, but become more understandable with good visualization. I had hoped to see creative new ways to visualize theories like special and general relativity, including things like black holes and gravity waves.

Unfortunately, although the physics covered in the book is well documented and accurate, there isn’t much new to someone who has studied the field or seen other illustrations of Einstein’s theories. With a more general audience in mind, Ottaviani and Dye just don’t go deep. For the layman this is enough to give a general idea, but for a physicist it only scratches the surface. That’s probably for the best, though, since even most experts don’t understand all of the intricacies of relativity.

That being said, there’s a decent amount of interesting physics in the book, and the illustrations are all accurate. The creators were free to do things in a graphic novel that you wouldn’t normally see in a biography. For example, to explain his special theory of relativity, Einstein has a long (imaginary) conversation with Isaac Newton, who lived more than a century earlier.

There are still plenty of expositions, however, delivered by secondary characters – never Einstein himself – who break the fourth wall and speak directly to the reader. Dialogue spoken to the reader is cleverly indicated by squarer speech bubbles, while rounded speech bubbles are used when characters talk to each other.

Much of the text appears to come from letters written either by Einstein or to him in correspondence with various people. It gives an interesting insight into the private writing style of the great scientist.

Graphic novel 'Einstein' balances his science and his life
Courtesy of First Second

Unfortunately, Einstein has some weaknesses. The biggest, in my opinion, is the complete lack of chapters. The story is written as one long narrative from start to finish, spanning nearly 300 pages. Also, jumps between scenes, events, or stories often occur in the middle of a page. Regularly, the first panel of a new page is the end of the previous scene and also the transition to the next. Maybe the decision to exclude chapters stems from the idea that life can’t be sliced ​​up into nice, self-contained divisions, but I think the reading experience would be enhanced if some sort of narrative breaks had been included.

The lack of chapters also compounds the second biggest weakness, that the story kind of drags in the middle. The beginning is interesting, summarizing Einstein’s childhood and the development of his thought experiments up to his so-called “miracle year”, in which, at the age of 26, he published five articles revolutionaries. The final third of the book comes to life describing Einstein’s interactions with other famous scientists of the time, specifically Niels Bohr. Einstein’s friendship with Bohr coupled with his opposition to Bohr’s quantum theory makes for an engaging and even heartwarming tale.

The middle of the book recounts Einstein’s frequent travels through central Europe from one academic position to another, as he attempted to establish himself in academia while developing the general theory of relativity. Unfortunately, this period does not include any real progress in his personal or professional life. It may be important for the biography, but it slows the story down too much.

Graphic novel 'Einstein' balances his science and his life
Courtesy of First Second

Of course, the most important aspect of any biography is the picture it presents of its subject. This graphic novel obviously praises Einstein for his genius, as it shows his involvement in almost every major discovery in modern physics. In fact, that might overemphasize Einstein’s involvement in some of the discoveries, but again, the man’s legacy speaks for itself.

As a person, Einstein is mostly portrayed as friendly and sympathetic, perhaps as a kind, somewhat whimsical, and often distracted uncle who you enjoy spending time with at Christmas. The reader feels as if they are often lost in their own thoughts and thought experiences, living as much in their fantasies as in reality.

Ottaviani, to his credit, doesn’t shy away from Einstein’s worst character flaws. In fact, most of the scenes in his private life focus on his mistreatment of his wives, especially his first wife, and their children. Unfortunately, Einstein was so preoccupied with his research that he was absent most of the time as a father. And in his love life, he was also apparently more drawn to fantasies of what could be than the reality he had. He cheated on his two wives, indulging in numerous affairs – even one with a Russian spy.

Overall, the image we find of Einstein as a person is best summed up by a quote from actor Charlie Chaplin near the end of the graphic novel, “Kind, sociable, and in love with humanity, but detached of its environment and the people of it.”

The biography of the graphic novel Einstein would make a great gift for anyone with even a little interest in their life, or physics in general. The well-researched narrative is charming and entertaining. The artist Dye wonderfully recreates Central Europe and America at a time of great social, political and technological upheaval. The writer Ottaviani may not explore Einstein’s theories in depth, but he gives us a very interesting overview of all the groundbreaking discoveries that transformed classical physics into modern physics, while revealing key aspects of Einstein’s personal life.

ITPA Science is co-presented by AIPT and the The New York Skeptics.

Einstein cover crop

Graphic novel ‘Einstein’ balances his science and his life

Einstein

This well-researched graphic novel biography is charming and entertaining. Artist Jerel Dye beautifully recreates Central Europe and America at a time of great social, political and technological upheaval. Writer Jim Ottaviani may not explore Einstein’s theories in depth, but he gives us some very interesting insight into the groundbreaking discoveries that transformed classical physics into modern physics, while revealing key aspects of life Einstein’s personal.

Well-documented look at the life of Einstein.

The art recreates the sets and clothing very well.

Excellent overview of many groundbreaking scientific theories.

Slip a little in the middle.

Physics is not explored in depth.

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‘If Masterpiece Means Anything, It Means Cat’s Cradle’: Kurt Vonnegut’s Novels Everyone Should Read | Books https://harpmaker.net/if-masterpiece-means-anything-it-means-cats-cradle-kurt-vonneguts-novels-everyone-should-read-books/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 08:03:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/if-masterpiece-means-anything-it-means-cats-cradle-kurt-vonneguts-novels-everyone-should-read-books/ Jhe delivers Kurt Vonnegut, which was born 100 years ago this Friday, is funny, unwavering, tender, austere, imaginative and approachable – and just as relevant today as when it published its first novel 70 years ago. Start with one of his best books and you’ll quickly understand why he’s held in such rare affection by […]]]>

Jhe delivers Kurt Vonnegut, which was born 100 years ago this Friday, is funny, unwavering, tender, austere, imaginative and approachable – and just as relevant today as when it published its first novel 70 years ago. Start with one of his best books and you’ll quickly understand why he’s held in such rare affection by his fans: “Uncle Kurt,” as this year’s Booker winner Shehan Karunatilaka calls him.

The opening words of Vonnegut’s most famous book, Slaughterhouse-Five (1969) – “It all happened, more or less” – sound like a modern manifesto for autofiction. But it is this “more or less” playfulness that both acknowledges the truth of the source material – Vonnegut, as a prisoner of war in Germany, witnessed the February 1945 Allied firebombing of Dresden and built this book around him – and the flights of fancy (crazy -tile structure, aliens, time travel) with which he decorated it.

Ron Leibman and Michael Sacks in the 1972 film adaptation of Slaughterhouse-Five. Photography: Ronald Grant

The novel, Vonnegut’s fifth, represents a concentration of the author’s style which means that, while not the best of his works, it is certainly the most intensely Vonnegut-ish. The balance of irony and sentimentality that “Uncle Kurt” excelled at is exemplified in the book’s two most famous lines. Each character’s death is punctuated by the resigned – or stoic – sigh of “So it’s okay”, and the ironic epitaph that veteran Billy Pilgrim imagines for his tombstone – “All was well and nothing wrong” – is now often quoted with a straight face. (So ​​it is.) On the publication of Slaughterhouse-Five, a journalist from this newspaper wrote that “Catch-22 [published eight years earlier] was a splendid, wild but abstract joke compared to the irony and compassion of Mr. Vonnegut’s.

Slaughterhouse-Five was not Vonnegut’s first attempt to put World War II into a novel. There’s a case to be made for the blackest of his black comedies, Mother Night (1961), to be considered his unsung masterpiece. It slipped under the radar upon publication as it went straight into paperback – Vonnegut needed the money – and it took time for his greatness to be recognized.

Mother Night takes the form of the confessions of an American spy and Nazi propagandist as he awaits trial in Israel. “Howard W Campbell, Jr – it’s your life!” Campbell’s tragedy and sin is his failure to realize that the lies he told on his shows, even if he didn’t mean them, brought relief to real Nazis. In punchy chapters of catchy dialogue and selections from Campbell’s letterbox (“Dear Howard, I was very surprised and disappointed to learn that you weren’t dead yet”), Vonnegut gives us a surprisingly brilliant and very legible of the conscious descent of a man in a world of evil. “We are what we say we are,” he writes in his introduction, “so we have to be careful what we say we are.”

As he rose to literary fame and his skepticism of the Vietnam War made him a countercultural figure, two things happened. First, Vonnegut’s books began to be censored and banned – and even burned, as was the case with Slaughterhouse-Five at Drake High School in North Dakota in 1973. Vonnegut wrote to the school board principal , in polite but uncompromising terms.

“If you bothered to read my books, to behave as educated people would, you would learn that they are not sexy and do not advocate savagery of any kind. They beg people to be kinder and more responsible than they often are. It’s true that some characters speak rudely [… t]watering words really don’t hurt kids much. They didn’t hurt us when we were young. It is the bad deeds and the lies that hurt us.

The other thing that happened was that Vonnegut leaned into the playfulness that was emerging in his writing, and the best example of that mid-period Vonnegut – serious subject matter, anecdotal fantasy and eccentric characters – is Breakfast of Champions, or, Goodbye Blue Monday! (1973). The book is also replete with another emerging Vonnegut trope – text-breaking cartoons: “To give an idea of ​​the maturity of my illustrations for this book, here’s my picture of an asshole,” he wrote, at above a generously proportioned, felt asterisk. While working on Breakfast of Champions, Vonnegut said in a letter to his editor, “It takes me so long to find out what my books are about, so I can write them.” And what was this one about? American society, and how it drives its inhabitants – like car dealer Dwayne Hoover – crazy.

A reality check: No longtime writer – Vonnegut wrote 14 novels plus many other books – is perpetually perfect, and many Vonnegut fans would agree that his novels from the 1980s and later are pale imitations of his previous work: at their weakest are disjointed, unstructured and repetitive. “I don’t understand how he gets the excitement to get in front of the typewriter and write this stuff,” said Vonnegut fan Douglas Adams. “It’s like going through the motions of your own stylistic tricks.” For me, Deadeye Dick (1982) and Hocus Pocus (1990) are the runts of the litter. But from the same period, Bluebeard (1987) and Galápagos (1985) are better, and fortunately Vonnegut’s last novel, Timequake (1997), was a strong comeback.

But Vonnegut’s brilliance was not limited to the novel: several collections of his stories were published, although one of his best works was Welcome to the Monkey House (1968). The stories may be “samples of works I sold to fund the writing of the novels”, but there’s nothing called here, and reading a handful will give you a rich dose of concentrate. of Vonnegut: the writer who “smiles and says it straight” (New York Times). Try Who Am I This Time?, about a quiet couple who can only communicate through the scripts they act out, or Vonnegut’s mini-masterpiece Harrison Bergeron, set when “the year is 2081 and that everyone is finally equal”. This is of course a dystopian horror story.

But time is running out, and if reading Vonnegut today is as important as I say, there has to be a headline first, right? Yes: if “masterpiece” means anything, it means The cat’s cradle. Vonnegut’s 1963 novel may be thin, but it taps into all that is best about his work: his sci-fi imagination (see also 1959’s The Sirens of Titan), his deep reserves of humanity, his ability to temper irony with sentimentality and his manner with a quick quip. Clearly inspired by Cold War fears – it was released the year after the Cuban Missile Crisis – it’s a living, deadly comedy, a pocket epic in which the world ends to the tune of the fake religion of Bokononism. Along the way, there are riffs on shortcomings outside of science, the uses of art, the value of others, and the importance of carrying on in the face of a world that can only make you ask, “My God – life! Who can understand it for even a minute?

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Calysta and Adisseo to Build New Food Protein Plant in Saudi Arabia https://harpmaker.net/calysta-and-adisseo-to-build-new-food-protein-plant-in-saudi-arabia/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 12:26:59 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/calysta-and-adisseo-to-build-new-food-protein-plant-in-saudi-arabia/ Calysseo, a joint venture between US company Calysta and animal nutrition player Adisseo, said the next site for its alternative protein factory would be Al Jubail in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The plant would be developed in partnership with Food Caravan, a business development and project company, active in different areas of protein […]]]>

Calysseo, a joint venture between US company Calysta and animal nutrition player Adisseo, said the next site for its alternative protein factory would be Al Jubail in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The plant would be developed in partnership with Food Caravan, a business development and project company, active in different areas of protein and animal feed.

The alliance aims to build a 100,000 tonne capacity fermenter – the companies expect the facility to become operational by the end of 2026, pending approvals and other elements.

Saudi Arabia’s energy ministry has given the go-ahead for gas supply to the project, while the Royal Commission for Jubail and Yanbu has designated a site for construction, which also has support from the Saudi ministry. of Investment and its National Center for Industrial Development.

Today’s announcement follows the success of Calisseo to light uplast month of its first protein production plant, a 20,000-ton fermenter in China. This site is intended to produce an SCP product, under the FeedKind brand, for the Chinese aquaculture market.

FeedKind, the partners explained, is generated during the fermentation of methanotrophic and scavenger microorganisms with methane, ammonia and mineral salts. Methane is pumped through a fermenter and microorganisms metabolize the gas to generate protein-rich biomass, which is dried and pelleted before use.

Commenting on the move to Saudi Arabia, Alan Shaw, CEO and co-founder of Calysta, said:This would be our second industrial-scale facility and an important step in providing enough sustainable protein to meet growing and pressing global demand. Our patented fermentation technology has been proven to produce a high quality protein ingredient and with the efficiency of using a natural bacterial process, we are ready to scale quickly and meet this demand.

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Book review| Sameer’s first fictional novel is philosophically written and succinctly tells the story of migrant workers https://harpmaker.net/book-review-sameers-first-fictional-novel-is-philosophically-written-and-succinctly-tells-the-story-of-migrant-workers/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 11:30:38 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/book-review-sameers-first-fictional-novel-is-philosophically-written-and-succinctly-tells-the-story-of-migrant-workers/ Sumit Sharma Sameer’s first work of fiction: Wake Up, Ali… Wake Up Now: A South Asian Diasporic Story. Image Courtesy: amazon.com The region called “South Asia” has seen many ups and downs over the years. These ups and downs have taken various forms and have deeply affected South Asian states in more ways than one. […]]]>

Sumit Sharma Sameer’s first work of fiction: Wake Up, Ali… Wake Up Now: A South Asian Diasporic Story. Image Courtesy: amazon.com

The region called “South Asia” has seen many ups and downs over the years. These ups and downs have taken various forms and have deeply affected South Asian states in more ways than one. Among these many factors, one is migration – internal and external – ie people coming from outside and people coming from outside.

If we look at the history of these movements, we can certainly see that South Asia largely saw people coming from outside, which started around the time of Vasco da Gama, a Portuguese traveler who made his mark in the region – in search of the new world for their own economic pursuit. Not only Vasco da Gama, but many people from Western Europe also began to travel beyond their own region after the signing of the papal bull or decree in 1492 that allowed European countries to colonize other ones. for economic and other purposes.

Overall, for most of the second half of the second millennium, migration was from other parts of the world to Bharat Varsha – an ancient name for the region which collected large amounts of wealth through the extraction and revitalized their own economic conditions. Such a state of affairs transformed the process of capital formation which greatly contributed to the process of industrialization in North-Western Europe.

This change in the process of capital formation ultimately changed everything in the region and the once economically powerful, whose combined GDP was more than half of the world’s GDP until 1800 AD, according to British economist Angus Maddison, started to fall. This change in the process of capital formation has also resulted in significant trends and patterns in the migration process. That said, migration has now taken the opposite trend, that is, it is now the turn of people from the subcontinent to become migrant workers for their own subsistence.

The large number of colonies in the West Indies, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and many other countries is the consequence of this process. For good or bad reasons, however, things started to change again, especially after the end of the 20e century and the first decades of the 21st century. Over the period, the changes that have taken place have resulted in a paradigm shift in the political economy of migration itself.

Political instabilities and failing economic policies have forced many people in the region to leave their countries as migrant workers. Remittances from migrant workers have become the major sources of income for the majority of South Asian countries, which has also contributed significantly to poverty reduction. Yet the societal impacts of migration as a phenomenon are also enormous.

Paradoxical as it may seem, the classic example is that children and spouses back home only remember their loved ones when their ATMs run out of money. This is the classic example and it can be said that family relationships become more materialistic than emotional.

Not only that, but families are also breaking down in more than one way and society is going through many upheavals never before seen in South Asian history. Almost a generation now has seen either political instability or mass migration.

Young people in general feel that they have just been born as future migrant workers. And many students in the region only think of going abroad in one form or another. Part of the problem is neoliberal economic policies that have led to the growth of consumer culture without sufficient production at home. The consequences of migration (both positive and negative) are well reflected in popular culture: songs, novels, movies, dramas and many more. Today, a large number of fiction and non-fiction are also written around the stories of migrant workers.

Book Review: Wake Up Ali…Wake Up Now: A Story of the South Asian Diaspora

Book review Sameer's first fictional novel is philosophically written and succinctly tells the story of migrant workers

Wake-Up Ali…Wake Up Now: A South Asian Diasporic Story by Sumit Sharma Sameer (translated from Nepali to English by Sushrut Acharya); Publisher: Vitasta Publishing Pvt, Ltd. New Delhi; pages: 136; Price: 395

And one such fiction that recently came out on the market that examines various facets of migrant workers is that of a Nepali writer Sumit Sharma Sameer. Sameer’s novel “Wake UP Ali…Wake UP Now: A South Asian Diasporic Story” – originally published in Nepali – is the story of those migrants who left their country and are forced to work/live abroad.

Ali, a Pakistani who is the novel’s main protagonist, was forced to leave the country not only due to internal strife and lack of economic opportunities, but also pressure from his own wife who wanted him to earn more. of money and consumes all the facilities provided. approximately by the factors of modernity per se.

In fact, there are many more Alis, Riyas and others as “migration” has become the established trend in the region and often seen as part of prestige in society if family members work at the outside. However, only the “migrant” knows where the shoe pinches.

Ali, an engineer by training, eventually finds himself in casual work in Canada with the help of Nepali migrant workers. In the workplace, Ali faces many difficulties but he also finds his love there and makes new friends. But unfortunately, as is often the case, he forgets his own family at home. Not only has this family become something of a myth for people like Ali.

This is not only true for Ali but also for Riya from India who went to train to support her family back home. When migrant workers are away from their own families, it creates its own momentum in the home family and society, as well as in the lives of those working as migrant workers.

The novel tells the story of South Asians working abroad, mostly in the West. This is not only history, it is also the philosophical question of our time, because the writer explains what should be the parameters of life – the source of happiness – material, spiritual or being in the family.

Most of the time, the state of loneliness that hovers around migrant workers forces them to support and be for each other, perhaps, is also the most important factor that the novel offers.

A philosophically crafted and succinctly told story of migrant workers is truly engaging. and citizens in general so that everyone can live a decent life. For this, it is urgent to reverse the process of capital formation as said at the beginning.

The author is a policy professional, columnist and writer specializing in South Asia. The opinions expressed are personal.

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NDG Book Review: ‘Someday, Maybe: A Novel’ looks at family bereavement https://harpmaker.net/ndg-book-review-someday-maybe-a-novel-looks-at-family-bereavement/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 00:46:12 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/ndg-book-review-someday-maybe-a-novel-looks-at-family-bereavement/ By Terri Schlichenmeyer It’s possible. Not now, but probably later…if at all. The thing is, you’re patient and you can wait. It will happen eventually, one way or another, and you are okay with things as they are in the meantime. You’re good. Whatever you hope for is possible – except when, like in Onyi […]]]>

By Terri Schlichenmeyer

It’s possible.

Not now, but probably later…if at all. The thing is, you’re patient and you can wait. It will happen eventually, one way or another, and you are okay with things as they are in the meantime. You’re good. Whatever you hope for is possible – except when, like in Onyi Nwabineli’s new novel “Someday, Maybe,” life has other plans.

She prayed he hadn’t read the latest text messages she had sent on his phone.

Eve Ezenwa-Morrow was angry with her husband, Quentin. She had sent him a flurry of “where are you?” messages that escalated until she went to his photography studio to tell him what she was thinking – and she found him lying in a pool of blood, dead.

This, clearly, was wrong. Young husbands are not supposed to kill themselves. They don’t let their wife manage, wonder why, go on living, take care of her mother who blames the wife. Who always blamed the woman for everything.

Thank God Eve’s parents were doctors; they sedated her and watched over her. Thank goodness her sister, Gloria, was a lawyer who cared for her as Eve lay in bed, unable to do anything but sleep and cry. Thank goodness her younger brother, Nate, didn’t leave her alone – even though alone was what she really wanted.

Alone from her persistent Nigerian family, alone from her goofy bosses at work, her best friend, and above all, she wanted Aspen to stop calling.

Eve had nothing to say to her husband’s mother; Aspen would never have listened anyway. She was more focused on driving a wedge between Eve and Q that never quite stuck.
Why didn’t Eve see that Q was upset if, indeed, that was why he killed himself?

Why didn’t he say anything, email her, try to talk to her about it, something? He didn’t even leave a note. No, instead he left her something else that she wasn’t even sure she really wanted…

If “Someday, Maybe” was alive, you’d be forced to pick it up, hold it against your shoulder, and pat it until it hiccupped. You whispered comforting things.

This book hurts in a way familiar to anyone who has tragically lost a loved one.
That feeling of bawling until you can’t breathe is the focus of this book; in fact, it’s big and overwhelming and almost a character unto itself. And yet, author Onyi Nwabineli portrays grief so well that there is humor in this tale, in those completely inappropriate moments of laughter that sometimes occur, making strangers think the bereaved has lost their minds. . These top-down emotions – humor that isn’t out of place, screaming pain and hope – are wrapped up in family drama that you shouldn’t even try to resist.

Readers shouldn’t expect wet tears forever, but if you’re heartbroken, this book may be too much to bear right now. If you’re good at it, though, you’ll find that “One day maybe” is too. Will you like it?

Yeah, it’s quite possible.

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Study reports on a new property of antibodies, light chain coherence https://harpmaker.net/study-reports-on-a-new-property-of-antibodies-light-chain-coherence/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:30:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/study-reports-on-a-new-property-of-antibodies-light-chain-coherence/ In a recent study published in the journal Nature, researchers are investigating whether pairs of unrelated B cells of naïve, unswitched, memory, and plasmablast phenotypes that have similar heavy chains also have the same light chains. Study: Functional antibodies exhibit LIGHT CHAIN ​​COHERENCE. Image Credit: peterschreiber.media / Shutterstock.com Background Grouping antibodies by function has been […]]]>

In a recent study published in the journal Nature, researchers are investigating whether pairs of unrelated B cells of naïve, unswitched, memory, and plasmablast phenotypes that have similar heavy chains also have the same light chains.

Study: Functional antibodies exhibit LIGHT CHAIN ​​COHERENCE. Image Credit: peterschreiber.media / Shutterstock.com

Background

Grouping antibodies by function has been a challenge, despite this. Theoretically, antibodies that perform the same function should have similar epitopes and complementary paratopes. However, while the in vitro assaying antibodies for specific binding to antigen is relatively simpler, only a small number of antibodies can be assayed for their neutralizing activity.

Clonotypes are groups of antibodies from a single donor from a common ancestral recombinant cell. Similar clonotypes performing identical functions have been found within and between individuals.

Studies of influenza, Zika, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have found that antibodies show some fidelity in their heavy and light chain genes. However, light chain consistency, which is the occurrence of similar light chains in unrelated B cells not belonging to the same clonotype with similar heavy chains, has not been examined.

About the study

In the current study, researchers sequenced full-length antibody genes from 1.6 million matched B cells of naïve, unswitched, plasmablast, and class-switched memory phenotypes obtained from samples of peripheral blood donated by four unrelated individuals. The sequences covered the leader region of the V gene and parts of the constant regions used to determine the subclass and isotype of the antibody.

The sequences were divided into naïve and memory B cell groups based on somatic hypermutations occurring outside the junction regions estimated from the V gene alleles inferred for each donor. Antibody sequences with no mutations were considered naive, and the rest were considered memory B cell sequences. Categories sorted by flow cytometry were used to confirm these assignments.

Pairs of B cells with similar heavy chain V genes and the length of the third antibody heavy chain complementarity determining region (CDRH3) were compared separately for naive and memory cell types to determine whether the genes of the light chain were also similar.

Under the hypothesis that the antibody recurrences would arise from common recombination events, the junction sequence was analyzed by aligning the antibody sequences to the V(D)J reference sequences. This allowed the researchers to determine whether the observed recidivism rates were comparable to the rates expected by chance.

Simulations were also used to predict the number of recurrent naïve antibodies. Recurrent antibodies were also compared to arbitrary antibodies to determine the complexity of junction regions.

Study results

The results suggested 82% light chain consistency in memory B cells of different origin with the same heavy chain genes for the V region and 100% CDRH2 amino acid identity. In comparison, naive B cells, which did not undergo functionality selection and do not contain somatic hypermutations, exhibited only 10% consistency in their light chains.

Thus, light chain coherence likely coexists with heavy chain coherence in memory B cells. These cells are formed by peripheral and thymic selection and produce functional antibodies.

Analysis of independent datasets related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), multiple sclerosis, Kawasaki disease and other diseases suggested 93% light chain consistency in memory B cells. However, pairwise comparisons of the current data with other older and more recent independent data revealed a light chain consistency of 70%, thus eliminating the possibility that these results are explained by cross-contamination.

Furthermore, randomly swapping 10% of memory and naive B cells resulted in 82% light chain consistency for memory B cells and 17% consistency for naive cells, thus ruling out possible misclassification. cells.

Junction region comparisons revealed that recurrent antibodies, both memory and naïve B cell types, have significantly fewer inserted bases and comparatively less complicated junction regions than arbitrary antibodies. This increases the likelihood of chance recurrences.

Recurrent antibodies with inserted nucleotides continued to show light chain coherence compared to naïve antibodies. This suggests that all functional antibodies, regardless of complexity, exhibit light chain coherence and differ only in frequency.

conclusion

Overall, the current study reported that light chain coherence is ubiquitous in memory B cells, while recurrence in naïve cells is purely a function of chance.

Light chain consistency is correlated to selection and acquired functionality. This observation explains why it is less common in naïve B cells and more prevalent in memory B cells that undergo central and peripheral selection upon antigen exposure.

Moreover, the recurrence of naïve and memory B cells is associated with reduced junction complexity in recurrent antibodies compared to arbitrary antibody junction regions, thus explaining their recurrence rates.

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GBP/USD rises towards 1.1700 on new optimism infused by UK leaders, US GDP looks on https://harpmaker.net/gbp-usd-rises-towards-1-1700-on-new-optimism-infused-by-uk-leaders-us-gdp-looks-on/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 23:44:18 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/gbp-usd-rises-towards-1-1700-on-new-optimism-infused-by-uk-leaders-us-gdp-looks-on/ GBP/USD is aiming to hit the 1.1700 mark amid positive market sentiment. The new British leadership has instilled optimism in the spirit of the pound. US GDP is seen up 2.4% despite continued Fed policy tightening. GBP/USD is heading towards the round resistance of 1.1700 during the Tokyo session. The cable recorded a fresh six-week […]]]>
  • GBP/USD is aiming to hit the 1.1700 mark amid positive market sentiment.
  • The new British leadership has instilled optimism in the spirit of the pound.
  • US GDP is seen up 2.4% despite continued Fed policy tightening.

GBP/USD is heading towards the round resistance of 1.1700 during the Tokyo session. The cable recorded a fresh six-week high at 1.1639 and eyes further upside thanks to Market sentiment and the optimism infused by the new American leadership.

Good market sentiment bolstered risk-sensitive currencies. On Wednesday, general market optimism breathed new blood into perceived risk assets, however, the S&P500 posted losses driven by underperformance in technology actions. Moderate projections presented by tech giant Microsoft (MSFT) triggered a sell-off on NASDAQ, which also impacted the US-500 stock basket.

Pound bulls are enjoying strong offers from market participants as new British leadership following Rishi Sunak’s appointment as UK Prime Minister has brought a sense of optimism to the minds of the pound .

On Wednesday, the Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Kristalina Georgieva, told Reuters she expects new British Prime Minister Sunak to lead Britain on the path to medium-term fiscal sustainability. .

Apart from that, British Chancellor Jeremy Hunt announced a postponement of the presentation of the medium-term budget plan, which is now scheduled for November 17. He believes that the budget plan will show a decline in debt over the medium term. And cited economic stability and restoring confidence as their top priority.

In the future, the United States Gross domestic product (GDP) will be the main trigger. According to projections, the U.S. economy expanded at a growth rate of 2.4% in the third quarter of calendar year 2022 against the previously recorded decline of 0.6%.

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The series does not follow the novel https://harpmaker.net/the-series-does-not-follow-the-novel/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 19:51:04 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/the-series-does-not-follow-the-novel/ CMAthe new adaptation of Interview with the Vampire is an absolute sensation. The series, based on the novel by Anne Rice, follows the story of Louis de Pointe du Lac (Jacob Anderson), a young man who, in his prime, is turned into a vampire by his bloodsucking lover. , Lestat de Lioncourt. (Sam Reid). The […]]]>

CMAthe new adaptation of Interview with the Vampire is an absolute sensation. The series, based on the novel by Anne Rice, follows the story of Louis de Pointe du Lac (Jacob Anderson), a young man who, in his prime, is turned into a vampire by his bloodsucking lover. , Lestat de Lioncourt. (Sam Reid).

The fans are really delighted with the seriesbut it does not follow the novel.

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