Fictional – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 04:27:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://harpmaker.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Fictional – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ 32 32 Ian Somerhalder, star of “The Vampire Diaries”, auditioned to play Christian Gray in “50 Shades of Gray” https://harpmaker.net/ian-somerhalder-star-of-the-vampire-diaries-auditioned-to-play-christian-gray-in-50-shades-of-gray/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 03:13:26 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/ian-somerhalder-star-of-the-vampire-diaries-auditioned-to-play-christian-gray-in-50-shades-of-gray/ Everyone’s favorite fictional vampire was almost the star of a big movie franchise. Ian Somerhalder, who starred in The vampire diary during all eight seasons, was one of the many actors who auditioned for the role of Christian Gray in 50 shades of Gray. However, he unfortunately did not get the role. Ian Somerhalder | […]]]>

Everyone’s favorite fictional vampire was almost the star of a big movie franchise. Ian Somerhalder, who starred in The vampire diary during all eight seasons, was one of the many actors who auditioned for the role of Christian Gray in 50 shades of Gray. However, he unfortunately did not get the role.

Ian Somerhalder | Photo by Dominik Bindl / Getty Images

“The Vampire Diaries” star Ian Somerhalder was one of many actors to audition for “50 Shades of Gray”

According to Insider, Ian Somerhalder originally auditioned to play Christian Gray in the 2015 film 50 shades of Gray but ultimately lost to Jamie Dornan. A few of the other actors the producers considered for the role were Chase Crawford, Ryan Gosling, and Charlie Hunnam.


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An abundance of friends is better than things https://harpmaker.net/an-abundance-of-friends-is-better-than-things/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 06:08:24 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/an-abundance-of-friends-is-better-than-things/ By Joan Hershberger The big gala gala is drawing to a close. Saturated with too much food, fun and gifts, we’ve decided “it’s time to ditch some things” this year. The lifestyle hero of Lee Child’s fictional series starring retired former Marine Jack Reacher suddenly looks attractive. Reacher only has the clothes on his back […]]]>

By Joan Hershberger

The big gala gala is drawing to a close. Saturated with too much food, fun and gifts, we’ve decided “it’s time to ditch some things” this year.

The lifestyle hero of Lee Child’s fictional series starring retired former Marine Jack Reacher suddenly looks attractive. Reacher only has the clothes on his back and a toothbrush. He takes buses, gets off whenever he wants, and only has time to solve one person’s horrible dilemma. Then he buys clean clothes, throws away the dirty clothes and leaves.

In real life, we work for the money to buy more things that need a place to keep them. The bigger the house, the taller our piles of stuff.

Recently, for the second time, I helped sort out an estate. The first time was the effects of my grandmother. As her family sorted out, we remembered the big and small events we had shared as a family. Such a contrast to the ridding of this year after the death of a confirmed bachelor. His three plates, his unused stove, his nearly empty refrigerator and his boxes of stew underscored his celibacy. A few basic clothes, a bed, a lounge chair, a TV and a van with the tools of his mechanic trade said he didn’t need much.

Still, he filled his apartment with “cool things” he found at estate or garage sales. His eclectic tastes included: trains, records, ceramics, knick-knacks, paintings, stamps, coins, Christmas decorations and books. Lovers of garage sales knew him well. One man said, “If I saw him in another room at a real estate sale, I would go around the other way. I knew when we met we would talk for a while.

“When he got it back, he didn’t let go,” another friend commented.

I expected to find the lair of a hoarder. I did not do it. We had plenty of room. We found the three closets stacked at the limit and the walls lined with shelves and loaded display cases.

It didn’t matter what he paid for things, whatever their real value, it didn’t matter anymore. Everything had to be sold, given away or trashed. Just like with my grandparents’ housewares.

In the end, the really cool stuff he left behind came from the stories his friends told about his gregarious nature and the many ways he has helped people. For example, every week he would drive a guy without a car into town to shop for groceries. For a long time, he monitored an elderly woman on a daily basis who lived alone until her health condition forced him to move.

In the back of his pickup truck, he carried tools to change oil or do minor engine repairs to supplement his limited income and help others in a pinch.

“The story that best describes him,” a friend said, “is when he saw a woman with a dead car in the Walmart parking lot. He found out she didn’t need one. new battery, she needed a new starter. So he got one and changed it for her on the spot. “

He hadn’t planned on “what if …” He had planned to appreciate the people he met every day and help where he could.

As we chop down the trees, put away the decorations, and prepare for the New Year that lies ahead, reflect on how things complicate our lives, consume our time, and drain our energy just as Jack Reacher often details. As the New Year approaches, decide to spend your time and energy with people creating memories that last. Those who stay will cherish these shared moments long after the gifts are gone or have been consumed.

Joan Hershberger is a former editor of the El Dorado News-Times and author of “Twenty Gallons of Milk and other El Dorado News-Times” columns.


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Islamic comic book content finds growing audience https://harpmaker.net/islamic-comic-book-content-finds-growing-audience/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 22:18:04 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/islamic-comic-book-content-finds-growing-audience/ (RNS) – During a panel in November at the famous San Diego Comic-Con, Sohaib Awan described “Beyond the Forest”, an upcoming series of graphic novels, as “a Muslim Narnia”, referring to fantasy novels written by British author CS Lewis (a series which itself includes a handful of references to Islamic culture). “Beyond the Forest”, by […]]]>

(RNS) – During a panel in November at the famous San Diego Comic-Con, Sohaib Awan described “Beyond the Forest”, an upcoming series of graphic novels, as “a Muslim Narnia”, referring to fantasy novels written by British author CS Lewis (a series which itself includes a handful of references to Islamic culture).

“Beyond the Forest”, by Noor Yusuf, Tati Nuari and Anny Maulina, focuses on a group of children guided by a supposed “wise woman” who helps the group travel to a mystical land in a magical mihrab – or a prayer niche that points to Mecca. The fantasy series is part of Fictional Frontiers, a new initiative announced at Comic-Con, which aims to support Muslim voices with key roles in the development of creative storytelling.

Fictional Frontiers will launch in early 2022 as a fully digital subscription platform for telling stories that often, but not exclusively, have an Islamic frame of reference. While comics will be a key part of the content offered, Fictional Frontiers also hopes to develop prose, poetry and video.

“Graphic novels are often a way to test new stories and new ideas that are ultimately developed into TV shows or movies; everyone is hungry for great content right now, ”said Awan, CEO of Jabal Entertainment, which is behind this new effort.

The initiative’s first two comics were announced at Fall Comic-Con, including “Beyond the Forest,” which draws on fantasy themes. The other, “MODAL”, a sci-fi series written by Ink and Hack and drawn by Dedy Koerniawan, takes place in the near future, where data is used to micromanage the lives of ordinary people.

As July Comic-Con draws 130,000 attendees to San Diego, the smaller fall event focuses on industry insiders for next year’s developments.


RELATED: UFOs and Science Fiction in Muslim Culture Go Far Beyond “Dune”


Awan, who is both of Czech and Pakistani descent, had no intention of getting into the comic book industry when he came up with the idea for a comic book series. But its unique story of battles between jinn and aliens has caught the attention of one of the major publishers in the comic book industry. When the publisher offered to buy it, the Philadelphia-area lawyer found himself refocusing on his creative endeavors.

Sohaib Awan. Photo courtesy of Fictional Frontiers

“I just knew there would be interests in dynamic storytelling outside of superheroes, wizards and dragons,” Awan told Religion News Service. Awan started the Fictional Frontiers radio show, initially focusing on the Philadelphia area. It has become, as Awan said, “the only weekly radio show in the country devoted to serious discussion of popular culture.”

Awan’s partner in the new Fictional Frontiers initiative also has a background outside of the comic book industry. Sarah Mughal is a literary fiction writer who practices kung fu in her spare time and has experience in creating more inclusive spaces for creative content. Mughal founded #APIpit, a Twitter pitch event in May 2021 designed to draw attention to self-identifying writers and illustrators in Asia and the Pacific Islands. A second event is planned for 2022.

“The entertainment industry has often limited representations of Islam to certain archetypes acceptable to Muslim characters and an overuse of the desert aesthetic as well. Yet most Muslims are not from the MENA region, ”Mughal told RNS, referring to the Middle East and North Africa.

The Pakistani-Canadian writer is based in the suburbs of Toronto. His writings are inspired by the Koranic tradition and are also devoted to exposing the violent history of colonialism.

The duo believe the initiative comes at the right time as the consumer base of comic book stories has diversified. The November panel was reportedly the first since the event’s inception in 1970 to feature Islamic content developed and written by Muslims.

But while Muslim heroes are not yet visible on the big screen, fans of Muslim comics are increasingly finding themselves at comic book conventions, such as the attention-grabbing Muslim women group that appeared at Comic Con. from New York dressed as different Avenger characters.


RELATED: The “Dune” novels are inspired by Islamic motifs and have in turn inspired Muslim artists.


The San Diego Comic-Con 2019 event included a panel titled “SuperSalaam: Muslim Nerds, Geeks and Fandom”. Equally of note was Blair Imani, a Muslim woman who attended the cosplay panel as the character of “Star Trek” Geordi LaForge – with the addition of a hijab.

His costume garnered international media coverage and praise from LeVar Burton, the actor who played LaForge in the “Star Trek: The Next Generation” television series. Imani reported Comic-Con attendees opposite her inclusion of a hijab, but she pointed out that LaForge may have been of Muslim descent, given that the fictional character was born in Somalia.

While Fictional Frontiers and Muslim cosplay may be popular reflections of the growing engagement of Muslims in comics, a number of new initiatives are underway by major studios to bring Muslim actors and heroes to the screen. . Egyptian-American actor Abubakr Ali was chosen this year to play the hero of Netflix’s upcoming “Grendel” series. He is the first Arab Muslim to be cast as a superhero in a major franchise.

Meanwhile, Disney is working on the new “Blade” and “Ms. Marvel” streaming series. Both projects will include significant Muslim talent. “Blade,” which begins filming next year, will feature two Muslim Americans in leading roles – actor Mahershala Ali in the title role and Bassam Tariq as the film’s director. “Ms. Marvel,” slated for release in early 2022, will be the first comic-book-based streaming series to feature a Muslim character in her lead role.



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This is where Mamma Mia was really filmed https://harpmaker.net/this-is-where-mamma-mia-was-really-filmed/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 00:58:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/this-is-where-mamma-mia-was-really-filmed/ Most of “Mamma Mia!” was filmed on the Greek island of Skopelos in the Aegean Sea. Like Kalokairi, Skopelos is a small island with no way to get there other than a ferry ride to its shores. Before the film, the island didn’t know much about tourism. In an article for The Telegraph shortly before […]]]>

Most of “Mamma Mia!” was filmed on the Greek island of Skopelos in the Aegean Sea. Like Kalokairi, Skopelos is a small island with no way to get there other than a ferry ride to its shores. Before the film, the island didn’t know much about tourism. In an article for The Telegraph shortly before “Mamma Mia!” liberation, Paul Mansfield wrote, “Most of the island’s income comes from farming, and it doesn’t look to itself to attract tourists.” Foods like plums, pears, almonds, figs and olives grow around the verdant island, which is also dotted with old churches.

In September 2007, the cast and crew of “Mamma Mia!” filmed on the island for six weeks at places like the tiny bay of Kastani beach – imagine Sky and Sophie laying all their love on top of each other – and the steep staircase leading from a cliff to the Church of Agios Ioannis Kastri. It turns out the church is rather small, so only the exterior was filmed for the wedding scene, while the interior was shot in a UK studio, according to Mirror.

While Skopelos was not much of a tourist spot before the film, it has since become a destination for “Mamma Mia!” Fans. Local hotel owner Mary Diamantis told Mirror she has celebrated more than 150 weddings a year since the film’s release. Despite this, the island has not changed too much; she said visitors don’t really want “Mamma Mia!” thematic attractions, but the beautiful version of the island they see in the movie.

However, for the 2018 sequel, “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again”, they did not return to Skopelos but instead filmed in Vis, Croatia.


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Fiction to watch in 2022 | fiction https://harpmaker.net/fiction-to-watch-in-2022-fiction/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/fiction-to-watch-in-2022-fiction/ Wwhether it’s a hangover after a few years of the pandemic, a sign that writers have had particularly productive lockdowns, or maybe it’s the many centenarians to come – Odysseus, Land of waste and Jacob’s bedroom – but 2022 moans positively with great novels. We will leave the ObserverThe unrivaled debut feature film to cover […]]]>

Wwhether it’s a hangover after a few years of the pandemic, a sign that writers have had particularly productive lockdowns, or maybe it’s the many centenarians to come – Odysseus, Land of waste and Jacob’s bedroom – but 2022 moans positively with great novels. We will leave the ObserverThe unrivaled debut feature film to cover new UK novels and focus largely on books published in the first half of the year.

Prepare your hearts, because Douglas Stuart is back. After the extraordinary success of Shuggie Bath, his second novel, Young Mongoose (Picador, April), is another beautiful and moving book, a gai Romeo and Juliet set in the brutal world of Glasgow housing estates. Hanya Yanagihara also follows a painfully moving predecessor, whose In Paradise (Macmillan, January) gives us three stories far removed in space and time, but each unique in its power to summon the joy and complexity of love, the pain of loss. I’m not sure I’ve ever missed a book’s world as much as I miss it In Paradise now I left it. A new Kamila Shamsie novel is always worth celebrating, but Best of friends (Bloomsbury, October) is something else: an epic story that explores the bonds of childhood friendship, the possibility of escape, the way the political world interferes with the personal, all through the prism of two well-drawn protagonists.

Tilted Axis Press is home to some of the most incandescent and urgent writings from all corners of the globe. I had never heard of Monique Ilboudo, who manages to be both Burkina Faso’s ambassador to Scandinavia and a prolific author. So Far from my life (September) is the story of Jeanphi, a young man from the fictional West African town of Ouabany. It is beautifully translated by Yarri Kamara and the best book on the hope and despair of the migrant experience that I have read. The second novel by NoViolet Bulawayo, Glory (Viking, March), takes place in the fictional state of Jidada. Here the “father of the nation” – an old horse – rules over the other farm animals, which tell the story. Robert Mugabe is only there by name in this striking allegory – a Farm animal it shows how stories of liberation and self-determination curdle under the power of a dictator. There is another very different Africa in that of Marlon James Moon Witch, Spider King (Penguin, March), the second of its Black Star trilogy. Even more captivating and inventive than its predecessor, the 177-year-old witch Sogolon’s story is like Tolkien on ayahuasca.

Two debuts in the United States to watch. The immortal king Rao by Vauhini Vara (Grove Press, June) is a brilliant and beautifully written book on capitalism and patriarchy, on Dalit India and digital America, on power, family and love. Honorée Fanonne Jeffers is a famous poet, but W’s love songsEB Wood (HarperCollins, January) is her first novel, and what a novel it is. Spanning the generations, it traces the history of an African-American family from slavery to the present day, all centered on (another) fictional city: Chicasetta, Georgia.

Akwaeke Emezi’s beginnings, Fresh water, announced them as an explosive new voice in 2018. That they are already in their seventh book – and this at 34 years old – shows the unbridled energy of their work, the extent of their vision. Their third novel for adults, You made a fool of death with your beauty (Faber, May), is the story of Feyi, an artist, and her best friend, Joy. It follows Feyi through a wild summer of creation and destruction, art and music, and lots of sex. Is Deesha Philyaw The Secret Life of the Ladies of the Church (Pushkin Press, May) a novel? Is it a collection of related stories? Either way, it’s glorious – the clever, sad, and very funny portrait of several generations struggling with their desires and faith. Jessica Andrews’ debut novel, Salt water, was wonderful. The follow-up, Deciduous teeth (Hodder, July) is even better. A story of young love and desire that is full of the most magnificent writing.

Alex Pheby’s Bitten was a resounding success for the brilliant Galley Beggar Press. Now he goes on with another super clever piece of literary fantasy, Malarkoi (August), set in the middle of the ruins of Mordew and with the protagonist of the first novel, Nathan Treeves, dead. I love Sandra Newman’s work and the short stories she is currently writing Julia, a feminist account of One thousand nine hundred and eighty four, excited me a lot. Before that, however, is Men (Granta, June), a dazzling work of speculative fiction that imagines a world in which all men, overnight, disappear from the Earth.

Monica Ali’s long-awaited fifth novel, Love marriage (February, Hachette), was worth the decade it took to arrive. The strong and independent Yasmin Ghorami is about to marry Joe Sangster, the libertine son of a prominent feminist. It’s a real family saga, both deliciously old-fashioned and full of surprising twists. Patrick Gale’s latest, Mother’s boy (Mars, Headline), delivers a characteristic and tender novel about a young man who grows up in the shadow of one war and the whispers of the next, with his mother, the indomitable Laura, always there to watch over him.

A few last books to look forward to … Guardian football journalist Jonathan Wilson wrote a clever, cinematic short story, Streltsov (Blizzard Media, January) about Soviet football star Eduard Streltsov, arrested on the eve of the 1958 World Cup. If you are looking for this century Odysseus, look no further than that of Patrick McCabe Poguemahone (Unbound, April), a surprisingly lyrical free-verse novel set in Margate and in the minds and memories of Dan and Una Fogarty. It might sound like a chore at over 600 pages, but it’s a blast. Perhaps best known so far for her news, in These days (Faber, March) Lucy Caldwell has written a novel with a huge heart; full of light passages in prose, this tale of the Belfast blitz is breathtaking. Finally, there is Karen Campbell’s Paper cup (Canongate, June), the story of a homeless woman crossing Scotland to return a lost engagement ring. It is beautiful and devastating and I am writing about it.


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‘Dickinson’ series finale review – AppleTV + Emily Dickinson Show pulled off a satisfying ending https://harpmaker.net/dickinson-series-finale-review-appletv-emily-dickinson-show-pulled-off-a-satisfying-ending/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 12:00:51 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/dickinson-series-finale-review-appletv-emily-dickinson-show-pulled-off-a-satisfying-ending/ Two years ago when Dickinson launched on Apple TV + as the flagship comedy of the newly created streamer, I spared no ink to make it scroll, call it’s “a din of dissonant elements, a show that demeans the real Emily Dickinson by forcing the fictional Dickinson to drag herself screaming on the floor after […]]]>

Two years ago when Dickinson launched on Apple TV + as the flagship comedy of the newly created streamer, I spared no ink to make it scroll, call it’s “a din of dissonant elements, a show that demeans the real Emily Dickinson by forcing the fictional Dickinson to drag herself screaming on the floor after having her period.” A year later, I came back to this site here to reflect on how the series matured in its second season. And now, as the show wraps up with its third and final set of episodes, I reflect on the journey it took me on. I spent a lot of time thinking about how Dickinson has changed, but here at the end of its run I realize that it is I who am different.

When Dickinson debuted, I tried to shake it up fairly, at least that’s what I thought. “I tried not to be a surly literary purist,” I replied in the first season. Reader, I admit: I was a surly literary purist. When I first met Dickinson, I was intrigued by the challenge the series set for itself: to overshadow the relatively blank canvas of historical life, marked by the lingering mystery of nearly three decades of isolation. While the series only aspired to cover Dickinson’s teenage years, long before she retired from the outside world, I sensed there was a tantalizing character journey to be experienced: how a full girl did she become a cloistered woman who spoke to visitors through a door? At first I felt that DickinsonThe brooding teenage poet wasn’t a convincing antecedent for the sharp, weird adult we knew she would become. But now that the series is over, with its final moments hinting at the start of Dickinson’s fateful isolation, I see what Dickinson was up to the task from the start.

At the end of his poignant series finale, Dickinson Finally takes us inside the room that is said to contain so much of Dickinson’s adult life. In a serene and breathtaking montage, a year (maybe more) goes by, all seen from inside Dickinson’s bedroom. As the seasons change outside her windows, we see her working on poems at her desk, knitting by the fireside, watering an ever-larger indoor garden, and even putting on an alluring outfit suited to the streets of her native Amherst. , only to stay inside. But in the end, this room doesn’t contain Dickinson’s life, because no wall could.

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Looking at a painting of a ship hanging on the wall of his bedroom, as lines of poetry burst through his head, Dickinson whispers: poetry. We then moved on to an idyllic fantasy, where Dickinson frolic on the beach with his dog, dressed in his simple writer’s blouse. Then someone calls him from afar: it’s a group of sirens, basking on an outcrop of rocks, beckoning him to take to the sea. “The sirens from the basement have come out to look at me,” continues the poem. Climbing into a boat, Dickinson paddles to meet these magnificent creations of his own genius; then, we go black and the credits roll.

Dickinson’s legacy has always been complicated by the same impenetrable puzzle: How could a protected hermit write such visionary poems? How did someone who saw so little the world manage to introduce him to the world? For three seasons, Dickinson sought to solve the mystery. But he has never been more lucid or sure of himself than in this brilliant ending, a hymn to the inimitable power of the writer’s imagination. It’s a fitting farewell to a show that has always refused to be contained by the drab limits of reality.

There is something that I started to say, “I want more aliens in my literary fiction. Traditional literary realism is fine, but I want to live in a freer world, a world where “literary” and “genre” are not antonyms, where the unreal can coexist with the real. It took me a while to keep going, but eventually, Dickinson taught me that what I want from novels, I should also want from television. What i missed Dickinson from the start was the series’ purest truth: that it should be as imaginative and unfettered as Dickinson herself was.

Time traveler Emily Dickinson and Lavinia Dickinson meet Sylvia Plath.

Apple

At the beginning of Dickinson, I was appalled when the fictional Dickinson threw an opium party while her parents were away for the weekend, where she danced with a giant hallucinatory bee played by the deranged Jason Mantzoukas. But why should not Emily Dickinson dancing with a giant bee? Sounds like the kind of thing she would dream of, doesn’t it? In a landmark episode of season three, Dickinson and his sister Lavinia ascend a time-traveling gazebo to the mid-1960s, where they meet poet Sylvia Plath. Chatting together in her lifelong bedroom, now a museum exhibit hosted by undergraduates like Plath, Dickinson is dismayed to learn that history remembers her as a sad old maid who never left this room. Why should not Is Emily Dickinson a time traveler? No room could contain her, so why should a show about her be contained? We could use more shows with this bravery of vision.

Dickinson has never been a runaway success; It’s always been more of a hit, popular with literary jerks like myself, and writers and lovers who have seen their struggles and passions reflected in this radical reimagining of a legendary life. In the years to come I suspect Dickinson will become a cult classic, appearing time and time again on “Best Shows You Might Have Missed” lists. So whether you stream it today, tomorrow, or years from now, don’t be discouraged if you don’t get started right away. Give it a chance, give it time, and for goodness sake, don’t be a surly literary purist. If you free your mind, like Emily Dickinson, you might be surprised at how far you can go, all in one room.

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Welsh Government Takes Risk With New Restrictions As Treasury Money May Be ‘Fictitious’, Says Mark Drakeford https://harpmaker.net/welsh-government-takes-risk-with-new-restrictions-as-treasury-money-may-be-fictitious-says-mark-drakeford/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 13:45:11 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/welsh-government-takes-risk-with-new-restrictions-as-treasury-money-may-be-fictitious-says-mark-drakeford/ // = do_shortcode (‘[in-content-square]’)?> Prime Minister Mark Drakeford on Pawb ai’i Farn. Rishi Sunak in Westminster. Photo by the Department of Housing, Communities and Local Government (CC BY-ND 2.0). The Welsh government is taking a risk by spending money on the Covid restrictions, as the new support from the Treasury may be ‘fictitious’, the Prime […]]]>
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Prime Minister Mark Drakeford on Pawb ai’i Farn. Rishi Sunak in Westminster. Photo by the Department of Housing, Communities and Local Government (CC BY-ND 2.0).

The Welsh government is taking a risk by spending money on the Covid restrictions, as the new support from the Treasury may be ‘fictitious’, the Prime Minister has said.

The UK Treasury said on Sunday it would give the Welsh government an additional £ 270million to tackle the new Omicron variant of the virus.

But it was revealed on Monday that the Welsh government may have to repay the money if the UK government does not decide to spend similar amounts on restrictions in England.

Mark Drakeford said that although they had the money for the restrictions announced today, they did not have the “financial firepower” to go further and help anyone who might be out of work due to the restrictions.

“The UK government says it gave us an additional £ 270million. I want to make it clear that it is not that simple, ”he said.

“This money depends on how much is spent on similar services in England. We can get more and we can get less.

“We are moving at risk here. Our assessment is that we should step in, use the money, take the risk that the money announced by the UK government is real rather than fictitious to give businesses the confidence they need. “

He added that he had joined “colleagues from Scotland and Northern Ireland” in asking the Treasury to put in “protections” for areas that would be affected by Covid restrictions after Christmas.

“Double”

The UK Treasury said on Monday the Welsh government would receive an additional £ 270million, but if the amount given was more than the share of the money Wales would have received anyway, it would pay it back.

“If the amount of funding provided to each decentralized administration is greater than the Barnett consequences confirmed in the Supplementary Estimates, the difference will be reimbursed in 2022-2023, or during the expenditure review period if necessary,” said declared the Treasury.

“If the consequences of Barnett are greater than the amount provided in advance, the decentralized administrations will keep the additional funding.”

Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak, however, said the money gave decentralized governments “the certainty that they were asking to spend extra money now rather than waiting for extra budget for the new year.”

“Following discussions with the devolved administrations, we are now doubling the additional funding available,” he said.

“We will continue to listen and work with devolved administrations in the face of this serious health crisis to ensure that we get the recall for people all over the UK and that people in Scotland, Wales and Ireland from North are supported. ”


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The spies who fight to love James Bond https://harpmaker.net/the-spies-who-fight-to-love-james-bond/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 17:41:03 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/the-spies-who-fight-to-love-james-bond/ There are times in the latest Bond film where art mimics life a little too much. No time to die involves a deadly biological weapon, which is baffling during a raging pandemic. The fictitious MI6 leader known as “M” laments the fact that the world is arming “faster than we can respond,” and the enemy, […]]]>

There are times in the latest Bond film where art mimics life a little too much. No time to die involves a deadly biological weapon, which is baffling during a raging pandemic. The fictitious MI6 leader known as “M” laments the fact that the world is arming “faster than we can respond,” and the enemy, once a real adversary, ” now floats in the ether “. These same complaints are frequently made by actual defense and intelligence personnel grappling with AI, cyberattacks, and the prospect of high-tech warfare.

But while the British security establishment is grateful to Hollywood for highlighting such threats, it is careful not to show it. In fact, Bond films have always been a mixed blessing for British spies. The caricature of a misogynistic man of action risks deterring female and non-white, non-Oxbridge candidates who MI5, MI6 and GCHQ are now urging to join their ranks. Meanwhile, those who apply en masse to agencies after each new film release are often unsuited for a career in modern espionage. Celebrity 007’s alcoholic, playful, libidinous and blind killer “isn’t the kind of candidate we’re looking for,” a security official notes dryly.

For this reason, MI6 is wary of over-admiring its fictional – and most famous – officer. Alex Younger, former head of the foreign intelligence agency, admitted five years ago that he was “in conflict” over the films, and said if Bond was to join now, “he would have to change his ways” . Current chef Richard Moore coined a Twitter hashtag, #forgetjamesbond, to promote its desire to have a more diverse workforce. Meanwhile, Ken McCallum, managing director of the MI5 Home Intelligence Service, explained last year that launching an Instagram profile would help his agency “overcome any stereotypes of martini consumption that may persist” to give a better idea of ​​life in the service is actually like.

But maybe these spy bosses are protesting too much. Bond’s advantages for British soft power, and the image of his spies as skilled, respected and omnipotent, are still a clear positive. A Whitehall official told me that the mark is “extremely useful” when recruiting agents – the men and women who risk their lives to transmit intelligence inside key targets such as terrorist cells. Bond is an “immediate point of reference” for the idea of ​​taking risks for the greater good, explains the official. Hollywood’s MI6 budget may be unlimited, but that’s not a bad thing. “We are being portrayed in the minds of a global audience as a form of ubiquitous intelligence presence,” Younger conceded in a letter to The Economist four years ago. “It can be quite a force multiplier.”

The perceived advantage is so great that for decades other countries have suffered from “the envy of obligations,” according to Christopher Andrew, professor of history at Cambridge and official biographer of MI5. In Stars and spies he tells how Russia’s internal security service, the FSB, was so keen to inspire a Bond equivalent that it created an annual award for patriotic depictions of Russian spies in the arts. The winner in the 2007 film category was Code of the Apocalypse, in which super agent Darya Vyacheslavovna triumphs over clumsy CIA agents to deactivate four nuclear bombs planted by a terrorist. Her talent is such that American soldiers applaud her as she flees.

While the UK security services do not need to hold a competition, No time to die is potentially a movie they can support. Bond is more humble and vulnerable than previous incarnations, his lothario instincts softened by age and experience. He is now, as the FT film critic puts it, “an old castaway ghost with a working knee.” Charismatic Nomi, a young black rising star of MI6 – who views Bond with sardonic suspicion and outshines him – is a much better role model for the future of espionage than her acclaimed predecessor.

However, modernization does not go further. Bond’s vintage cars, on-site assassinations, and enthusiasm for alcohol during operations persist. His Aston Martin is deployed in a lightning car chase through the vertiginous streets of Matera, and he later enters the Villain’s Island lair in a Q branch-designed stealth glider that transforms into a submarine submersible. . In these scenes at least, it’s reassuring that the fantasy world of 007 remains largely untouched by real life.

helen.warrell@ft.com



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Hogwarts at GCU | Shehr https://harpmaker.net/hogwarts-at-gcu-shehr/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 23:43:08 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/hogwarts-at-gcu-shehr/ The building’s features remind visitors of JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series. – Author’s photos LLast year, the historic Government College University (GCU), Lahore building, with its imposing towers and turrets designed in the tradition of Gothic architecture, lent itself to the fictional world of Harry Potter when Khayaali Productions , the local makers of a […]]]>
The building’s features remind visitors of JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series. – Author’s photos

LLast year, the historic Government College University (GCU), Lahore building, with its imposing towers and turrets designed in the tradition of Gothic architecture, lent itself to the fictional world of Harry Potter when Khayaali Productions , the local makers of a fan movie potter, were looking to recreate Hogwarts in the city. That they finally found The last disciple and the resurrection of Voldemort, a purely student short film, is old news.

It was only recently that the young directors had the chance to present their film to the GCU, which is also their foster mother. The film inspired the university administration to organize a whole Harry Potter festival, which lasted more than a week. Festival visitors were amazed to see GCU come to life as a reimagined Potter school of wizardry and wizardry.

The GCU building, which stands on a natural hillock, was built in colonial times. Construction began in 1872 and was completed in 1877. According to Dr. Ajaz Anwar, the GCU is “known to be a mysterious building. The main [building] looks like a church; it has two towers, the taller one is known as the steeple, but for long periods there was no bell inside. In addition, there is a large hall with stamp wood and a slate stone roof.

He says the building is made from the best British red bricks. “Since we hadn’t made much progress in technology at the time, cast iron was used instead of welding for the balcony grilles.

“The architecture of that time depended on natural light and air, hence the roofs and doors [of GCU building] are very high, and most rooms with windows face north to keep temperatures cooler in summer.

There was a separate area for brewing potions.
There was a separate area for brewing potions.

“The architecture of that time depended on natural light and air, hence the roofs and doors [of GCU building] are very high, and most rooms with windows face north to maintain cooler temperatures in summer.

There are two porches – one in front of the beautiful Salam Hall and the other in front of the VC office. The room is inspired by “the architecture of the basilica, with a central nave and aisles along all four sides. The nave has a double height. The four naves are on two floors and form a gallery on the upper floor.

Perhaps the most interesting part of the GCU building is that it does not have gargoyles, which have been part of Gothic architecture for ages. Gargoyles are decorative, monstrous little creatures known to ward off evil spirits and threaten enemies. Their spouts helped rainwater to drain off the roof.

These college building features would certainly remind visitors of JK Rowling Harry potter series. Speaking to this scribe, Mariam Hassan Naqvi, who played one of the main actors of The last disciple and the resurrection of Voldemort, said, “Gothic architecture has always felt like Hogwarts to us. When Walid [the director of the movie] gave us the idea [of a Potter fan movie], we were all very excited. We put all of our heart and soul into making the film.

Salam Hall has been transformed into the Great Hall of Hogwarts.
Salam Hall has been transformed into the Great Hall of Hogwarts.

The Potter fan movie is set several years after Harry Potter and his friends took out Lord Voldemort. Director Waleed Akram, who is also the cinematographer and editor of the film, is said to have shot the entire film at GCU. The special effects of the film, performed by Zeeshan Hameed, also deserve a mention.

In addition to the film screening, the festival featured plenty of Harry Potter merchandise, food stalls, makeup and poster stalls, and photo booths. The “Muggles” – students dressed in “Potterverse” costumes, sporting pointy wizard / witch hats and wielding magic wands – introduced visitors to the Salam Room, remodeled like Hogwarts Great Hall, with brooms, bats and a separate area for brewing potions. Potter movie theme music playing in the background.


The writer is a freelance journalist


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London house that starred in Love Actually goes on sale with an asking price of $ 6 million https://harpmaker.net/london-house-that-starred-in-love-actually-goes-on-sale-with-an-asking-price-of-6-million/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 07:20:48 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/london-house-that-starred-in-love-actually-goes-on-sale-with-an-asking-price-of-6-million/ A gorgeous London house featured in the 2003 hit rom-com Love in fact hit the market for $ 6 million. Situated in the idyllic inner-city suburb of Notting Hill on one of its most iconic streets – St. Lukes Mews – the former stable three-bedroom, four-bathroom family home sits adjacent to the iconic Keira Knightley’s […]]]>

A gorgeous London house featured in the 2003 hit rom-com Love in fact hit the market for $ 6 million.

Situated in the idyllic inner-city suburb of Notting Hill on one of its most iconic streets – St. Lukes Mews – the former stable three-bedroom, four-bathroom family home sits adjacent to the iconic Keira Knightley’s pink house and the fictional characters of Chiwetel Ejiofor.

This Notting Hill house starred in the 2003 romantic comedy Love Actually. (Chevalier Franck)

The Pink House was made famous by the scene of Love in fact where Andrew Lincoln’s character professes his love to the character of Keira Knightley with a series of hand-written signs.

READ MORE: Leo DiCaprio drops $ 14 million on Beverly Hills mansion

Unlike the neighboring pink property, this solid brick stunner has been finished in a striking monochromatic color theme, with the exterior painted in a solid charcoal gray with white accents around the window sills and doors.

Notting Hill Love Actually London UK celebrity house estate property
This Notting Hill house starred in the 2003 romantic comedy Love Actually. (Chevalier Franck)

Inside, the home’s current owners have transformed the space into a minimalist, Scandinavian-themed sanctuary.

The open plan kitchen and living / dining room have exposed Siberian larch woodwork, as does the rest of the house, which offers a warm and earthy quality.

Notting Hill Love Actually London UK celebrity house estate property
This Notting Hill house starred in the 2003 romantic comedy Love Actually. (Chevalier Franck)

The kitchen also benefits from a large brushed stainless steel workbench that incorporates the four-burner hob and sink.

Other features include a roof garden designed by Tania Urban, a rooftop spa, fitted shelving and underfloor heating throughout.

Situated in the heart of the British CBD, the 139 square meter house and idyllic cobbled street are also close to popular attractions such as the Portobello Rd Market and several bars and restaurants.


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