Contemporary – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 00:37:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://harpmaker.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Contemporary – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ 32 32 A contemporary single-family home in Charlestown https://harpmaker.net/a-contemporary-single-family-home-in-charlestown/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 21:34:34 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/a-contemporary-single-family-home-in-charlestown/ You have your own courtyard and terrace to enjoy in the summer and direct access to your own private garage to avoid the cold in the winter. Sign up for our weekly home and property newsletter, featuring homes for sale, neighborhood events, and more. Photos by Atlantic Visuals 29 Belmont Street, CharlestownPrice: $ 1,459,000Cut: 2,067 […]]]>

You have your own courtyard and terrace to enjoy in the summer and direct access to your own private garage to avoid the cold in the winter.


Photos by Atlantic Visuals

29 Belmont Street, Charlestown
Price: $ 1,459,000
Cut: 2,067 square feet
Bedrooms: 3
Bathrooms : 3 full, 1 partial

Buying a house these days can be a bit like playing the lottery – you need a little luck if you want to be successful anywhere. But buy this Charlestown mansion and you’ll feel like you’ve hit the jackpot. For starters, this is a rare single family townhouse, which means you get amenities like a private yard with a back patio. And in a city with an aging housing stock, what makes this house even more unique is the fact that it is a newer construction. Built in 2004, you will thank your lucky stars for finding a home with modern furnishings, especially on snowy days when you can access your car from the first level thanks to the private parking in the garage (no more saving space or scratching your windows after a blizzard).

This home has not only been designed with contemporary amenities, but also with a modern aesthetic in mind. Once you have stepped through the front door and past the tiled entrance you will find the main level light and airy. In the living room, the high ceilings, hardwood floors and large windows add to the feeling of openness. In this area you will find a living space with a gas fireplace, a dining area and a chef’s kitchen with stainless steel appliances and an oversized granite island with seating. The house is also laid out in such a way that you can access the backyard from the kitchen, making the space an artists dream.

Further exploration of the main level shows that this home is equipped for both work and play: on the ground floor you will also find a cloakroom, a full bathroom, a utility room and an additional room that can accommodate be used like anything from a bedroom. at a desk. In the bedrooms, you’ll find massive closets, ready to help you tackle your next organizational project.

For more information contact Amy Wrenn with Kim Covino & Co., Compass, compass.com.

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Photos by Atlantic Visuals

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The Boston Home team has put together a list of the top home design and renovation professionals in Boston including architects, builders, kitchen & bathroom experts, lighting designers, and more. Get the help you need with the FindIt / Boston guide to home improvement professionals.

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Follow the white rabbit show in the garden https://harpmaker.net/follow-the-white-rabbit-show-in-the-garden/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 02:50:43 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/follow-the-white-rabbit-show-in-the-garden/ IF you look down the rabbit hole next month, you’ll find Cruden Farm in Langwarrin. Langwarrin Garden will host two performances of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, by the independent company Australian Contemporary Opera Co. The show will be performed on February 20. It opened in 2013 before selling annual seasons in London. The music, performed […]]]>

IF you look down the rabbit hole next month, you’ll find Cruden Farm in Langwarrin.

Langwarrin Garden will host two performances of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, by the independent company Australian Contemporary Opera Co.

The show will be performed on February 20. It opened in 2013 before selling annual seasons in London. The music, performed by a choir alongside an orchestra of nine musicians, is a blend of jazz, musical and opera.

Australian Contemporary Opera Co artistic director Linda Thompson said the show was great for families. Families will love all the fun and adventure of this contemporary staged and costumed opera house – with an appealing and beautiful score and a savvy blend of beloved classical literature with modern characters, all brought to life by the sets and costumes Originally created by award winning British designer Leslie Travers, “she said.” We have a fabulous cast and crew bringing this magnificent show to Victoria for its Australian premiere. “

Ticket holders will also be able to explore the gardens of Cruden Farm.

For reservations, visit events.humanitix.com/alices-adventures-in-wonderland-cruden-farm

First published in the Frankston Times – January 11, 2022


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Kelly Wearstler tells us about her creative Beverly Hills family home https://harpmaker.net/kelly-wearstler-tells-us-about-her-creative-beverly-hills-family-home/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 10:00:16 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/kelly-wearstler-tells-us-about-her-creative-beverly-hills-family-home/ We bring you a dose of Californian sunshine in the form of the family home in Beverly Hills, which pushes the boundaries of Kelly Wearstler. Internationally recognized for creating glamorous interiors in commerce and for residential clients, Kelly Wearstler is a true design icon in contemporary American interior design. Mid-century modernism and Hollywood regency combine […]]]>

We bring you a dose of Californian sunshine in the form of the family home in Beverly Hills, which pushes the boundaries of Kelly Wearstler. Internationally recognized for creating glamorous interiors in commerce and for residential clients, Kelly Wearstler is a true design icon in contemporary American interior design.

Mid-century modernism and Hollywood regency combine in this incredible villa that embodies the maximalist and confident glamor of the West Coast. Lush grounds and an inviting swimming pool surround the home, while inside large-scale rooms house eclectic and unique design patterns. Let’s take a peek inside and see what Kelly has to say about her striking abode …

When did you choose this property and why this one in particular?

Modern Home of Kelly Wearstler Beverly Hills

(Image credit: © Kelly Wearstler: Style Evocative, Rizzoli New York, 2019)

“I love the house’s rich Hollywood history. The house was originally built in 1926 as a Spanish Colonial and renovated as a Georgian around 1934 by architect James E. Dolena, ”says Kelly. “We bought the house in 2005 from the Broccoli family. Albert R. Broccoli was the producer and creator of the James Bond films. ‘


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Kazakh protesters topple former leader’s statue as unrest sweeps the country https://harpmaker.net/kazakh-protesters-topple-former-leaders-statue-as-unrest-sweeps-the-country/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 12:52:59 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/kazakh-protesters-topple-former-leaders-statue-as-unrest-sweeps-the-country/ Protests fueled by anger over sharply rising fuel prices and acute corruption have spread in recent days across Kazakhstan, a former Soviet republic larger than Western Europe. On Wednesday, mobs raided government buildings and toppled and destroyed a monument to Nursultan Nazarbayev, the autocrat who had ruled the oil-rich country since 1990. Artists, some of […]]]>

Protests fueled by anger over sharply rising fuel prices and acute corruption have spread in recent days across Kazakhstan, a former Soviet republic larger than Western Europe. On Wednesday, mobs raided government buildings and toppled and destroyed a monument to Nursultan Nazarbayev, the autocrat who had ruled the oil-rich country since 1990.

Artists, some of whom are participating in the protests, have expressed fears on social media before the internet crashes in a government-imposed blackout as a two-week state of emergency goes into effect.

President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, who has been seen as his hand-picked successor, with Nazarbayev in the post of “national leader,” requested peacekeeping troops from the Collective Security Treaty Organization on Wednesday, the Russian version of NATO. Belarusian dictator Alexander Lukashenko, who cracked down on protesters against his regime in 2020 and jailed many artists and cultural figures, expressed particular enthusiasm for the demand. The alliance said it would send troops “for a limited period of time.”

In a Facebook post on Wednesday, Suinbike Suleimenova, a feminist activist videographer, wrote:

“Now, is it important to stop the violence, all kinds of manipulation, time to think about what to do next? What reforms do we really need? The worst thing that can happen now is the transfer / takeover of power from one thief regime to another. It is important for us to preserve our independence, our status of State! “

Timur Aktaev, the former curator of Astana Art Fest, wrote that “the main thing is not to allow Islamization”.

Zoya Falkova, an ethnically Russian feminist artist who is currently visiting India and was therefore able to respond via Facebook Messenger on Thursday to a request from The arts journal says: “We don’t need [Russian president Vladimir] Putin and his political system in Kazakhstan. I wouldn’t want to be one of those he can use as an excuse to attack my country.

The Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement Thursday that it viewed the events in Kazakhstan as “an externally inspired attempt to undermine the security and integrity of the state by force, using trained armed formations. and organized “.

Kazakhstan is strategically located between Russia and China. The Kazakhs, a Turkish ethnic group, are Muslims, but the country also has a large Russian ethnic minority, especially in the north near the Russian border. For years, there were concerns that Russia could potentially claim this territory as part of Siberia.

One of the flagship projects of the Nazarbayev regime was the construction of a glitzy new capital, Astana, near the Russian border. The old capital, Almaty, was closer to China. Both cities were engulfed by protests.

Astana was renamed Nur-Sultan in 2019 in honor of Nazarbayev after his resignation as president. During his reign it was transformed from a dusty steppe railroad junction into a strange collection of buildings by internationally renowned architects including Norman Foster, who designed the Khan Shatyr entertainment center and a 62-meter-high pyramid. known as the Palace of Peace and Reconciliation.

There have also been attempts at major contemporary art projects, including Expo 2017 in Astana, and failed attempts to launch an inaugural Kazakhstan pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2019 and to tour internationally. contemporary Kazakh art which resulted in a financial scandal.

In 2018, the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow helped launch Tselinny, a contemporary art center in Almaty funded by an oil and real estate tycoon linked to Nazarbayev’s family.


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Talents of Madonna’s Son Divide Critics After Exposed As Secret Artist | Art https://harpmaker.net/talents-of-madonnas-son-divide-critics-after-exposed-as-secret-artist-art/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 16:31:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/talents-of-madonnas-son-divide-critics-after-exposed-as-secret-artist-art/ He’s a mysterious and up-and-coming artist whose work has been championed by people like Madonna and sells for up to five action figures. But there were eyebrows raised when it was revealed that “Rhed” was none other than the singer’s eldest son, Rocco Ritchie. The 21-year-old, Madonna’s child with her ex-husband Guy Ritchie, has reportedly […]]]>

He’s a mysterious and up-and-coming artist whose work has been championed by people like Madonna and sells for up to five action figures.

But there were eyebrows raised when it was revealed that “Rhed” was none other than the singer’s eldest son, Rocco Ritchie.

The 21-year-old, Madonna’s child with her ex-husband Guy Ritchie, has reportedly been quietly established as an expressionist painter, with a number of exhibitions at the Tanya Baxter Contemporary gallery in Chelsea, in the west of London, since 2018.

But since PageSix unmasked Ritchie, opinions have been divided as to whether his success is due to talent or the weight of his parents’ names.

It’s hard to argue that Ritchie is Rhed. Both are the same age, grew up in identical towns, and attended Central Saint Martins and the Royal Drawing School. In 2020, Madonna and Guy Ritchie even gathered at the Tanya Baxter Contemporary, alongside their partners and children, for a then unnamed exhibition.

So what do we know about his work? Rhed uses thickly applied oils and gestural brushstrokes for her depictions of the human form, according to Tanya Baxter, the gallery’s curator.

Madame Bicyclette de Rhed, aka Rocco Ritchie. Photography: courtesy of Tanya Baxter Contemporary

His inspirations include Lucian Freud, Francis Bacon, Paula Rego and Helmut Newton. While his subjects have “psychological tension,” he balances this out by using a colorful palette and “playfully painting figures that loom in the middle of the canvas, often against a monochrome abstract background,” Baxter says.

“Having an eclectic cultural background, with a childhood spent between New York and London, her paintings exude an endearing blend of innocence and confidence,” she adds.

Rhed himself said he was “fascinated by the world inside and out, especially where they meet.” The message of his paintings is that there is “beauty in the struggle of life” – more beauty, he says, than when life gets easy.

The King’s Road Gallery, which compared Rhed’s work to Jean-Michel Basquiat and Banksy, promotes a number of positive reviews, notably from Mervyn Davies, a former president of the Royal Academy. “Good artists are those who transform energy into something beautiful that resonates with the eye,” says Davies. “Anyone can be a painter, but it’s about making people think, provoking emotions.

Artistic writer Godfrey Barker called Rhed “an authentic, pure, undiluted product of the 21st century … Rhed is yet to be ranked among the Golden Youth who rocked the world at Frieze in 1988. But he needs to be mentioned in theirs. company He makes a powerful statement on Anxiety Now and points to the future.

Guardian art critic Jonathan Jones was less enthusiastic, suggesting the artist had been unveiled to the public too soon.

“His paintings are awkward teenage endeavors with no sign of originality or vigor,” Jones said. “Obviously, that doesn’t mean he won’t become a better artist over time. Painting takes work. So it seems a shame that Rhed has been put in the public eye when he’s just not, at this point, a true artist. These daubs are amateur stuff, vaguely imitating Picasso or Modigliani, that could have been done by a million young people.

The gallery, Jones added, “should be ashamed of cynically pushing this unwilling youngster into the market. They compare it to street artists Banksy and Basquiat but to be honest the only street they remind me of is King’s Road where this kind of bad art is sure to sell to chic fools.

Rhed’s coins are listed on Artsy for up to £ 24,000. It remains to be seen whether the world should have allowed Ritchie to continue using a false name.

Tanya Baxter Contemporary has been contacted for comment.


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10 times the Prairie food scene took center stage https://harpmaker.net/10-times-the-prairie-food-scene-took-center-stage/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/10-times-the-prairie-food-scene-took-center-stage/ A dinner scene from the Lentils episode of the Flat Out Food docuseries on CityTV.Taryn Snell / Courtesy of the manufacturer While the past twelve months seemed to flirt with normalcy, it’s pretty obvious that we’re not clear in COVID-19 just yet. From the beginnings of a breathtaking Saskatchewan-focused docu-series to the proliferation of contemporary […]]]>

A dinner scene from the Lentils episode of the Flat Out Food docuseries on CityTV.Taryn Snell / Courtesy of the manufacturer

While the past twelve months seemed to flirt with normalcy, it’s pretty obvious that we’re not clear in COVID-19 just yet.

From the beginnings of a breathtaking Saskatchewan-focused docu-series to the proliferation of contemporary food scraps in Alberta, here are ten highlights of 2021 in prairie food and drink.

Flat food docuseries premieres on CityTV

From left, Beth Rogers, Jenn Sharp, Thayne Robstad and Christie Peters near Smeaton, SK. during the filming of Flat Out Food.Adam Burwell / Courtesy of HalterMedia Inc.

If you are not from the Prairies, what do you really know about Saskatchewan?

Writer and author Jenn Sharp set out to educate Canadians about the depth and breadth of her home province’s culinary community and agricultural achievements through docuseries. Flat food. The six-part series was co-produced by videographer Adrian Halter and aired on CityTV Saskatchewan in early 2021.

As the host of the series, Ms.Sharp went for food in the Wanuskewin River Valley with native elders and remote forests with chefs like Hearth’s Thayne Robstad and Beth Rogers, milled flour at from heirloom cereals and made bread with the amazing baker Bryn Rawlyk of The Night. Oven. She has also brewed beer from lentils with Regina’s Rebellion Brewing.

Things were very informative, of course, but it was probably Ms. Sharp’s passion and warm demeanor that helped Flat food get a green light for season two. Expect this to air on CityTV in 2022.

Highly anticipated Major Tom opens at Stephen Avenue Place in Calgary

The Major Tom restaurant in Calgary.Chris Amat / Handout

Restaurants located at elevations higher than, say, a floor or two, are generally known to offer inflated prices and below-par food in return for some sort of awe-inspiring view.

Despite being on the 40th floor of a downtown skyscraper, offering captivating views of Calgary and the surrounding area, Concorde Group’s new crown jewel, Major Tom, makes no sacrifice with his quality of experience.

After being in the works for more than two years and having its opening delayed for months and months due to the pandemic, the restaurant has been the most sought-after reservation in Calgary since opening in July 2021.

Executive Chef Garrett Martin brings a lot of sparkle to the menu of what might otherwise be interpreted as a luxury steakhouse. Start with the egg yolk fried egg topped with pepperoni jam and homemade ‘tots’ with whipped sturgeon and you’ll be climbing high in no time.

Saskatchewan chef Jenni Lessard steps into the limelight

Chief Jenni Lessard takes a photo along the South Saskatchewan River in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan on October 30, 2021.Liam Richards / The Globe and Mail

When I ran into Ms. Lessard in October, she had just finished a TV production in Toronto and was now preparing for a storm on the east coast. As one of the guest chefs attending Devour! The Food Film Fest, she served aboriginal cuisine to enthusiastic attendees in the quaint town of Wolfville, Nova Scotia.

I leaned over to listen to the chef tell tales of her heritage and her prairie ingredients as people approached to taste her pan-seared bison steak with nettle puree. She talks about her role with Wanuskewin Heritage Park as a culinary consultant where she leads groups through the river valley to learn about foraging before sitting down to dinner with Indigenous Elders.

Being featured as a celebrity chef at a major culinary festival so far from home (Regina), her active participation in the Indigenous Culinary of Associated Nations and her latest work with the Saskatchewan Health Authority to create menus of native dishes for native patients are three notable things. worthy of three great cheers.

Alberta acquires three contemporary food halls

Located in the center of Calgary’s seat belt, First Street Market offers dishes from nine vendors ranging from comfort food to contemporary dishes and vegan options.Handout

With Canadian cities such as Winnipeg, Toronto and Montreal having repeatedly proven the success of the food hall model over the past few years, it always seemed a little odd that Alberta’s two big cities were lacking… until ‘to this year.

Edmonton’s 5th Street Food Hall opened earlier this fall, as did Calgary’s 1st Street Market, both of which were very successful. The 1st Street Market presents famous concepts such as Pure Street Food (Vietnamese), Saffron Street (Indian) and Moose and Poncho (Mexican).

While Calgary’s other food hall inside the Beltline District is not yet fully functional, it’s a safe bet that this space will be packed in early 2022.

Wilfred’s in Edmonton reinvents itself and reopens in collaboration with Made by Marcus

Wilfred is in Edmonton.Shaun Hicks / Document

Wilfred’s imaginative design and atmosphere have been appreciated by many since its initial opening in 2018. After trials and tribulations related to the pandemic, the restaurant has closed, albeit temporarily.

Fast forward to summer 2021 and it has announced plans for a reopening with a twist thanks to a collaboration with Calgary’s first ice cream maker Made By Marcus. Wilfred’s menu may be streamlined, but his feel-good vibes are back and better than ever.

Emily Butcher from Winnipeg becomes famous on Top Chef Canada and opens her own restaurant

Restaurant Nola in Winnipeg.Courtesy of Nola

Award-winning chef Emily Butcher (formerly deer + almond) was Winnipeg’s first chef in a decade to participate in Top Chef Canada in her ninth season last spring. While Ms Butcher may not have made it to the final, she landed a respectable sixth place finish and earned a reputation as a fan favorite of the series.

The chef took advantage of the spotlight on her and has now opened his own restaurant, Nola, in collaboration with Mike Del Buono of King + Bannatyne. Here, Ms. Butcher lets her creativity run wild with a menu centered on small plates and unorthodox flavor combinations.

If you’re wondering if her Top Chef Canada episode winner of Twice Baked Potato Gnocchi with White Butter Sauerkraut is on the menu, the answer is yes!

Famous Winnipeg chefs return to Canada and turn a pop-up into a fully realized restaurant

Corned Beef Bagel from Winnipeg’s pop-up Two Hands.Two hands

A food scene can always benefit from the fact that some of its most talented individuals go abroad… as long as they return home at some point.

That’s exactly what Winnipeg chefs Mike Robins and Keegan Misanchuk did earlier this year, returning from running kitchens to London (Pidgin and Brat, respectively) to launch a hit pop-up, Two Hands.

At first, the pop-up centered around their love of iconic English dishes such as corned beef bagels and meat pies, but continued to evolve and expand. Two Hands will now add more permanent vibrancy to Winnipeg’s restaurant scene as Mr. Robins and Mr. Misanchuk now renovate a brick and mortar location on West Broadway.

Canada’s first legume-based spirit produced in Alberta

Field Notes owner Faaiza Ramji is pictured where her product is made at the Fort Distillery in Fort Saskatchewan, Alta. June 25, 2021.Megan Albu / The Globe and Mail

Interesting single malt gins, vodkas and whiskeys are just a stone’s throw away these days in the crowded micro-distilleries scene. So what does a person have to do to stand out from this pack?

Edmonton’s Faaiza Ramji has banked on the development of a field pea-based alcohol – aptly titled “Don’t Call Me Sweet Pea Amaro” – and if the buzz since the product’s summer launch is any indication, she bet right.

The unconventional concoction originated with the Fort Distillery in Fort Saskatchewan and is now widely available across the province. Home bartender enthusiasts and curious taste buds will appreciate Amaro for its herbaceous liveliness and subtle earthy aftertaste.

Calgary’s River Café celebrates its 30th anniversary

Summer time at the River Cafe in Calgary, Alta.Todd Korol / The Globe and Mail

Given its long history in the Canadian culinary scene, it’s fair to say that Sal Howell’s River Café Restaurant is Alberta’s most iconic restaurant.

Being open for 30 years is a laudable achievement in itself. On top of that, staying open for three decades while garnering over 100 accolades across regional, national and international publications and remaining a leader in sustainability and locality deserves a standing ovation.

The restaurant celebrated its 30th anniversary in many ways, including a special anniversary tasting menu that features executive chef Scott MacKenzie the signature dishes of all the chefs who have run the kitchen before him.

New restaurants keep popping up despite pandemic hurdles

Justin Leboe, left, CEO of the Banff Hospitality Collective and Chef Kaede Hirooka on their patio at their new Hello Sunshine restaurant under construction in Banff, Alta. June 3, 2020.Todd Korol / The Globe and Mail

Even though the roller coaster has been this year for the foodservice industry in the Prairies and beyond, there was certainly no shortage of new restaurants and bars in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Spots to remember include the contemporary Japanese concept Hello Sunshine (Banff), Edmonton’s dreamy French brasserie La Petite Iza (that stained glass ceiling lighting!), Addicting Vietnamese restaurant Rau Bistro, and brand new sake bar at 17th Avenue Lonely Mouth (Calgary), Primal Pizza in Saskatoon, Chef Christie Peters’ new Detroit-style pizzeria and, finally, Winnipeg’s Tabula Rasa and Gladys Caribbean Kitchen.

We have a weekly newsletter from Western Canada written by our BC and Alberta office managers, providing a comprehensive set of news you need to know about the region and its place in the issues Canada is facing. confronted. register today.


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Israeli photographer featured at the Biennale – The Australian Jewish News https://harpmaker.net/israeli-photographer-featured-at-the-biennale-the-australian-jewish-news/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:12:11 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/israeli-photographer-featured-at-the-biennale-the-australian-jewish-news/ As Israeli photographer Erieta Attali explains, her childhood was saturated with ruins, spending her early years in Tel Aviv and Istanbul, then settling in Athens at the age of 13. Her studies and career have taken her all over the world, from Athens to London. in New York and finally in Melbourne. While in her […]]]>

As Israeli photographer Erieta Attali explains, her childhood was saturated with ruins, spending her early years in Tel Aviv and Istanbul, then settling in Athens at the age of 13. Her studies and career have taken her all over the world, from Athens to London. in New York and finally in Melbourne.

While in her early days she focused on the ruins and remains of buildings in Greece and Turkey, when she was asked to photograph contemporary architecture for the Greek entrance to the Milan Triennale in 1995, her career has changed.

“My photographic kingdom of isolation, aridity and traces, seemed irreconcilable with the iconic and often brilliant language of architectural photography,” she said. “It turned out, however, that there was no need for reconciliation; the same conceptual framework that I had used for the ruins, allowed me to interpret architecture as an element of the landscape.

Now she is part of In translation at the Ballarat International Foto Biennale, which explores the relationship between photographer and architect, studying the role of photography in the articulation of a sense of space and place.

This is something Attali certainly appreciates. “I have tried to develop a visual language where the separation between content (artificial structure) and context (natural or urban) is blurred, and the relationship between the two reversed,” she explained.

“Artificial structures are always located in an environment: a natural, urban or even abstract landscape that is constantly evolving. Awareness of this context not only provides us with information and a better understanding of the object being photographed, but also an insight into the natural forces that affect it and that may have shaped its original design.

Her photography has taken her to amazing landscapes including the Atacama Desert in Chile, Cappadocia in Turkey, the Arctic region of Norway, and the Blue Mountains in Australia. She says some of the most special photographs she took were documenting the city of Paris until 2020 when locked up due to COVID.

Attali joins three other great contemporary photographers for In Translation – Lard Buurman, Rory Gardiner and John Gollings.

For more information on the Ballarat International Foto Biennale, visit ballaratfoto.org

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Here’s how Loco Design puts contemporary Indian design on the world map https://harpmaker.net/heres-how-loco-design-puts-contemporary-indian-design-on-the-world-map/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 09:30:49 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/heres-how-loco-design-puts-contemporary-indian-design-on-the-world-map/ When it comes to design, craftsmanship and business, Loco Design has set new benchmarks. What sets them apart is their laser focus on the contemporary world without ever losing sight of the great heritage and tradition to which we are all heirs. This is where the magic happens. When the past meets the future – […]]]>

When it comes to design, craftsmanship and business, Loco Design has set new benchmarks. What sets them apart is their laser focus on the contemporary world without ever losing sight of the great heritage and tradition to which we are all heirs. This is where the magic happens. When the past meets the future – in the present!

Their gaming brand, Taamaa, is an ode to nostalgia and will take you back in time, but with a twist that incorporates their refined design aesthetic.

Presentation of Taamaa by Loco Design

Conceived by and an internal brand of Loco Design, Taamaa is a contemporary design brand committed to the renaissance of “Made in India”, through design, quality and service. Contemporary and durable materials, meticulous details and a flair to express function define Taamaa. With its roots firmly anchored in India, Taamaa creates versatile designs inspired by a curious lens on our surrounding world.

Using original graphics, minimal details and a modern form, the collections brought a contemporary touch to the ‘game’. Taamaa’s products are made from low impact materials, from bonded leathers to ultra-durable fabrics. They are committed to creating products that respect the environment. And, of course, the heart of it all is this: an endless commitment to quality design.

Design ethics

Taamaa’s game collection is a window into the brand’s philosophy: elevating everyday objects with a handcrafted human touch, generating an emotional response from the customer or the viewer. The brand design process is a collective process, involving manufacturing teams, designers and technicians, each bringing refinement to the product and its character.

Games bring this design philosophy and intention to life with their thoughtful design using low impact materials, connecting to a global renaissance of board game design.

From India to the MoMA Design Store

If you’re wondering what games are included, you’re ready to be pleasantly surprised, because most of our favorites are out there. They include: Tic Tac Toe, Snakes and Ladders, Ludo, Brainvita, Tangram.

The special thing about the games is that they are inspired by various cultures and regions, and therefore have an international appeal. What else? The famous MOMA Design Store currently offers designs from the Prisma range in its stores in New York and Hong Kong.

For more information on Taamaa by Loco Design, click here.


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Contemporary Houston-based artists share 5 things they love https://harpmaker.net/contemporary-houston-based-artists-share-5-things-they-love/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 19:13:15 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/contemporary-houston-based-artists-share-5-things-they-love/ Houston delivers the perfect balance of cosmopolitanism and comfort, a dynamic that makes it possible to perpetuate the life of a creative professional. Whether born, raised, or just based in the city, artists have the opportunity to use their work to connect, explore, and work towards more inclusive spaces within and beyond the art scene. […]]]>

Houston delivers the perfect balance of cosmopolitanism and comfort, a dynamic that makes it possible to perpetuate the life of a creative professional. Whether born, raised, or just based in the city, artists have the opportunity to use their work to connect, explore, and work towards more inclusive spaces within and beyond the art scene. To shine a light on some of the city’s most accomplished visual artists, Houstonia asked JooYoung Choi, Jamal Cyrus, and Emily Peacock to share five of the things they love.

While Choi’s imaginative works challenge us to dream, Peacock plays with the beauty of everyday life, and Cyrus merges fantasy and reality with American history. What inspires these artists to create?

JooYoung Choi

Raised in Concord, New Hampshire by adoption, JooYoung Choi is a multidisciplinary artist and global builder. As a young child yearning to be connected to her roots, Choi turned to storytelling in shows and films like Pee-Wee’s Playhouse, Sesame Street ‘s Follow this bird and AND the alien. Galvanized by a burning desire to reunite with her birth parents, she used her art to process feelings of alienation, hoping to manifest her family reunion. Through painting, sculpture, puppetry, video and installations, Choi explores the mythology of his fictional country, the Cosmic Womb. As conceived by Choi, the Cosmic Womb is as autobiographical as it is imaginative, featuring intricately designed characters who recur in his two- and three-dimensional work.

Five things JooYoung Choi likes:

  1. The world according to Mister Rogers: Important things to remember from Fred Rogers: “This book is really radical and inspiring.”
  2. Who Trapped Roger Rabbit (1988): “This film continues to grow with me, I refer to it a lot when I do special effects in my video work. There is a lot of puppetry and problem solving within it. It is also a criticism of gentrification.

  3. GWAR: “Their music brings me so much joy. There is something magical about a heavy metal rock band that also wants to be a puppet show at the same time.

  4. Trenton Doyle Hancock: “He’s my husband, my best friend and such an inspiration. To have someone with whom to share things and share ideas, show and tell every day in our house. It is a beautiful gift.

  5. KymLe Bahn: “KymLe is also a huge inspiration and definitely one of my great heroes. She is a nurse who is a role model on how it is possible to devote time to art even if it is not your job. full time, and how you can heal yourself and others with it.

Jamal Cyrus

Jamal Cyrus works through sculpture, assembly and performance. Inspired by material histories and the liberating power of black music, Cyrus investigates the successes and failures of black political movements in the 1960s and 1970s, as a continuing form of self-education. His concept art practice uses objects such as quilts and FBI files written to trace how American history is documented. As an extension of a project that used vinyl records, Cyrus created a fictional record label called Pride records which was founded in Detroit in the 1970s and produces conscious music to organize and politicize urban youth. In its design, the label was targeted by the US government, which caused the eventual dilution of its revolutionary goals. Cyrus tells this story through a series of drawings, collages and installations.

Five things Jamal Cyrus likes:

  1. KTSU, circa 1993: “Houston radio in the 90s was weirder and much more diverse.”
  2. Third quarter: “The Third Ward neighborhood includes the two schools that were key to my education (Texas Southern University and University of Houston).”

  3. Ménil collection: “The way the Menil collects different time periods and geographies, depending on someone’s interests and tastes, what I saw in this museum fueled my artistic influences.”

  4. Blues People by LeRoi Jones: “I think he was doing something that people understand and I listened to him on an audiobook.”

  5. Concrete block: “I started noticing them as gentrification accelerated in the Third Quarter, and they became, for me, a symbol of displacement and loss. This is made worse by the general occurrence of this type of erasure in our city. “


Emily peacock

From grief to motherhood and mental health, Emily Peacock uses humor to navigate the complexities of life. His vividly colored images often feature textured backgrounds and highlight everyday objects, like a single Dorito and his son’s fruit bowls. For more than a decade, members of his family have been the subjects and contributors to his work. Both an artist and a full-time educator, Peacock is influenced by the alternative image-making processes she teaches her students. His most recent work die of laughter addresses the severe isolation of the COVID-19 pandemic directly and translates personal experiences into an effort to de-stigmatize mental health issues.

Five things Emily Peacock likes:

  1. Kudzu: “I love nature in Houston, things are so green and lush.”

  2. APARTMENTS FILM LABORATORY: “It’s nice to have a lab in town, I can buy films, process photos and love supporting them. “

  3. Lord Huron: “They make very dark and mysterious sounds and it sounds like the perfect soundtrack to do my job.”

  4. Dave Chapelle: “If he founded a religion, I would join it. I think he is the philosopher of our generation.

  5. Speed ​​bumps : “I would have lost my mind (again) if I hadn’t had coffees. I like to bounce around different places in the city.


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Leeum Museum of Art collaborates with Naver TV and offers a special opening on December 27 https://harpmaker.net/leeum-museum-of-art-collaborates-with-naver-tv-and-offers-a-special-opening-on-december-27/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 06:01:16 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/leeum-museum-of-art-collaborates-with-naver-tv-and-offers-a-special-opening-on-december-27/ A view of the installation “Modern and Contemporary Art” at the Leeum Museum of Art (Leeum Museum of Art) Leeum Museum of Art will air its two permanent exhibitions on Naver TV showcasing its collection of keys and offer viewers the opportunity to visit the exhibits in person for a special museum opening on December […]]]>

A view of the installation “Modern and Contemporary Art” at the Leeum Museum of Art (Leeum Museum of Art)

Leeum Museum of Art will air its two permanent exhibitions on Naver TV showcasing its collection of keys and offer viewers the opportunity to visit the exhibits in person for a special museum opening on December 27.

One of the best private museums in the country, the Leeum Museum of Art has seen its popularity increase since it reopened on October 8, with reservation times allowing 600 people to visit it daily.

The museum currently has two permanent exhibitions of Korean traditional art and contemporary art. The special “Human, 7 questions” exhibition will run until January 2, 2022. The two permanent exhibitions have been reorganized with new collections for the first time in seven years, coinciding with the renewal of the museum.

The contemporary art exhibition will air Monday at 8 p.m., while traditional art will be on display on December 27 at the same time, with curators providing explanations on key pieces in the collection. During Monday’s exhibition, the museum will offer a link to make a reservation to visit the special exhibition inaugurated on December 27 for a maximum of 600 people in order of registration. The museum is generally closed on Mondays.

The Korean Traditional Art Exhibition features a total of 160 works, including state-designated national treasures such as “Gourd-shaped Ewer decorated with Lotus Petals” and “Taoist Immortals” by famous Joseon painter Kim Hong -do. The contemporary art section includes 76 works by Korean and international modern and contemporary artists.

The museum reopened after a lobby renovation and an upgrade of its digital services after it closed on February 25, 2020 due to the pandemic.

The museum’s recently opened Leeum Store has become a must visit for visitors who want to shop for handicrafts made by Korean artists. Entrance to the museum is currently free in commemoration of the reopening. The livestream can be viewed at tv.naver.com/leeummuseumofart.

By Park Yuna (yunapark@heraldcorp.com)


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