Contemporary – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 21:00:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://harpmaker.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Contemporary – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ 32 32 Brown’s new PPE Center applies a century-old framework to contemporary issues https://harpmaker.net/browns-new-ppe-center-applies-a-century-old-framework-to-contemporary-issues/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 20:38:55 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/browns-new-ppe-center-applies-a-century-old-framework-to-contemporary-issues/ One centre, many initiatives The PPE Center isn’t just a new research facility, Skarbek said — it’s also the host of exciting public events, a place for dynamic classes and student conversations, and the base for a number growing number of graduates and professors. “The PPE Center seeks to both nurture undergraduate conversations and also […]]]>

One centre, many initiatives

The PPE Center isn’t just a new research facility, Skarbek said — it’s also the host of exciting public events, a place for dynamic classes and student conversations, and the base for a number growing number of graduates and professors.

“The PPE Center seeks to both nurture undergraduate conversations and also support the newly created PhD. graduates who are trying to find their research groundwork and embark on future careers,” Skarbek said. “It’s not just about facilitating the thoughtful and open exchange of ideas among faculty, but also about keeping its doors open to the broader Brown and Providence communities so they can engage with great thinkers.” We have an ambitious mission to foster rigorous research and conversations in many different forms and places. We hope people from across campus and across the state will participate.

Beginning in late fall 2022, the center hosts a robust lineup of public conversations focused on civil discourse — building on a tradition initiated by Brown’s earlier Political Theory Project, which for years hosted popular discussions and student-centered research projects.

Skarbek said PTP programs, including the Janus Forum lecture series – which brought prominent public figures of all political persuasions to College Hill to debate the merits of coal industry divestment and the drivers of gun violence, among other topics – will continue under the PPE Center Umbrella.

In addition to the Janus Forum Series throughout the academic year, Skarbek said, the PPE Center also hosts an Odyssey Lecture Series, where influential scholars from around the world come to Brown to take the public on an extended adventure. into new and unexpected intellectual terrain. Previous Odyssey Conferences have covered topics such as the “War on Truth” and the 1971 Attica Uprising. Additionally, the PPE Workshop invites leading academics to present their current research to Brown professors and graduate students to obtain feedback, feedback and guidance, advance new knowledge and foster the development of new research projects and partnerships.

Brown students will have the chance to take a growing number of EPI-affiliated courses that cover the full range of topics, from the analysis of political behavior to the history of economic thought. Ryan Doody, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Political Economy’s course, “Choice, Trade, and Conflict,” provides an ideal introduction to IPE by inviting students to discuss how theoretical topics such as the theory of games and distributive justice apply to climate change, universal basic income and other contemporary topics. . In years to come, EPP courses may be taught jointly by professors from disparate fields, giving students the opportunity to learn more from an academic perspective. And there’s potential, Skarbek said, for a future PPE concentration to be offered to Brown students.

Students will also be able to engage with the PPE Center through various student organizations – including the Brown Political Review, a student-run newspaper; the PPE Society, a student reading and discussion group committed to ideological pluralism; and the new Journal of Philosophy, Politics and Economics, an academic publication that will highlight undergraduate and graduate student scholarships internationally.

Much of this published research will come from the center’s growing number of postdoctoral fellows and graduates. Since 2003, a postdoctoral fellowship program has hosted more than 40 scholars whose research has focused on national security, political psychology, and other challenging topics; in the future, the EPI Center program will accommodate recent PhDs. graduates from a wider range of humanities and social science fields to diversify areas of expertise among cohorts. Likewise, Skarbek said, a planned graduate student scholarship program is expected to enrich the center’s research landscape; regular graduate seminars will allow students representing a wide variety of academic traditions to learn new principles and perspectives from one another.

Finally, the PPE Center’s affiliate faculty corps will grow over the next few years, Skarbek said, given plans to create two to three endowed chair positions and a faculty fellowship program.

Ultimately, the PPE Center, like Brown more broadly, exists to cultivate creative thinking by encouraging collaboration between groups of people who see things differently, whether because they come from different academic backgrounds or because that they had different life experiences. Because when people with different perspectives work together, Skarbek said, they often generate unique solutions to complex problems in society.

“Providing events that present a wide range of perspectives, reigniting research that challenges the status quo — I think that’s at the heart of higher education,” Skarbek said. “When people bring different values, perspectives, and ways to the table in a conversation, they learn from each other.”

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Out-of-pocket costs for contemporary advanced prostate cancer care in commercially insured patients https://harpmaker.net/out-of-pocket-costs-for-contemporary-advanced-prostate-cancer-care-in-commercially-insured-patients/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 08:41:32 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/out-of-pocket-costs-for-contemporary-advanced-prostate-cancer-care-in-commercially-insured-patients/ Financial toxicity, including the burden of out-of-pocket expenses, can negatively affect patients’ decision to seek care. Here, researchers examined what influences a patient’s ability to pay for advanced treatments for advanced prostate cancer. Men with advanced prostate cancer who were treated by commercial insurers between 2007 and 2019 were located using the OptumLabs Data Warehouse®. […]]]>

Financial toxicity, including the burden of out-of-pocket expenses, can negatively affect patients’ decision to seek care. Here, researchers examined what influences a patient’s ability to pay for advanced treatments for advanced prostate cancer. Men with advanced prostate cancer who were treated by commercial insurers between 2007 and 2019 were located using the OptumLabs Data Warehouse®. Treatment options for these patients included androgen deprivation monotherapy, new hormone therapy, and systemic non-androgen therapy. The patient’s financial responsibility for medical care during the first year of treatment was the primary measure. Multivariate regression models were used to analyze associations between therapy and patient-related factors and out-of-pocket expenses. With the help of the Consumer Price Index CPI, all prices were updated to 2019 US dollars. The majority of the 13,409 men in the study group were treated with monotherapy of androgen deprivation (n=10,926), while only 6% (n=832) received new hormone therapy and 12% (n=1,651) received non-androgen systemic therapy. . Patients who chose androgen deprivation monotherapy spent an average of $165 in medical costs in the first year, while those who opted for new hormone therapy spent $4,236 and those who opted for systemic therapy not androgenic spent $994. Systemic non-androgen therapy and new hormone therapy both had adjusted annual out-of-pocket costs of $752 (95% CI: $600 to $903) and $2,581 (95% CI: $1,923 to 3, respectively). $240) higher than androgen deprivation monotherapy. Older age (65 to 74), black race, lower comorbidity scores, and lower family income were also correlated patient variables (P< 0.05) with higher out-of-pocket expenses related to therapy. Out-of-pocket expenses for patients with advanced prostate cancer who received new hormone therapy were significantly higher. These results highlight subgroups of patients particularly vulnerable to financial toxicity and encourage prescribers to consider it along with other aspects of toxicity when discussing treatment options for advanced prostate cancer in the context of shared decision-making.

Source: auajournals.org/doi/full/10.1097/JU.0000000000002856

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Gerald Carpenter: Camerata’s November program mixes percussion and piano, romantic and contemporary | Culture & Leisure https://harpmaker.net/gerald-carpenter-cameratas-november-program-mixes-percussion-and-piano-romantic-and-contemporary-culture-leisure/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 20:17:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/gerald-carpenter-cameratas-november-program-mixes-percussion-and-piano-romantic-and-contemporary-culture-leisure/ At their November concerts, Camerata Pacifica lead percussionist Ji Hye Jung teams up with pianist Soyeon Kate Lee to present a 21st century program with romantic interludes. Together or solo, the duo will perform: “How Sweet to Think of You as Infinite” by Emma O’Halloran (2019); “Gustave Le Gray” by Caroline Shaw (2012); “Corelli Variations” […]]]>

At their November concerts, Camerata Pacifica lead percussionist Ji Hye Jung teams up with pianist Soyeon Kate Lee to present a 21st century program with romantic interludes. Together or solo, the duo will perform:

“How Sweet to Think of You as Infinite” by Emma O’Halloran (2019); “Gustave Le Gray” by Caroline Shaw (2012); “Corelli Variations” by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1931); “Velocities (Moto Perpetuo) for solo marimba” by Joseph Schwantner (1990); “Mazurka in A minor, Opus 17, No. 4” by Frédéric Chopin (1833) and “Double happiness” by Christopher Cerrone (2012).

Emma O’Halloran

O’Halloran is a contemporary Irish composer of great and subtle gifts. His music strikes no poses and makes no case; it is simply. On top of that, “How Sweet the Thought of You as Infinite” is a lovely title (for a beautiful piece).

Shaw’s “Gustave Le Gray” continues its irresistible progression towards the center of the small group of young composers whose music will still be heard in 10 or 20 years. So far, its variety has proven to be almost endless.

One day I may know enough of her work to be able to hear a new piece and say, “Ah, Caroline Shaw! but she will always be able to surprise me.

Rachmaninoff composed the “Corelli Variations” – his last work for solo piano – in 1931, and dedicated the composition to his friend, the violinist Fritz Kreisler. In December of that year he wrote to another friend, the composer Nikolai Medtner:

“I played the Variations about fifteen times, but out of those fifteen interpretations, only one was good. The others were sloppy. I can’t play my own compositions! And it’s so boring! I was guided by the cough of the public.

“Each time the cough increased, I skipped the next variation. Whenever there was no cough, I played them in the correct order. In a concert, I don’t remember where – in a small town – the cough was so violent that I only played ten variations (out of 20).

“My best record was set in New York, where I played 18 variations. However, I hope you play them all and don’t ‘cough’.”

Although the theme is from Arcangelo Corelli’s “Violin Sonata and Continuo in D Minor, Opus 5, No. 12”, the theme itself was not written by Corelli, but is the melody of a typical Spanish dance called “La Folia”.

Many 17th-century composers wrote variations on it, including Marin-Marais and Henry Purcell. Later, Franz Liszt used it in his “Spanish Rhapsody”. Much, much later, in 1982, the Spanish composer Eduardo Paniagua wrote a set of 12… not exactly variations, but simply variants, in his piece “La Folia de la Spagna”.

In James Ivory’s film, “Jefferson in Paris”, Jefferson (Nick Nolte) keeps trying to play Corelli on his violin.

Schwantner’s “Velocities” aptly bears the subtitle “(Molto Perpetuo)”, as it moves forward in a pleasant, haphazard manner, seemingly hitting all the notes the marimba is capable of, without the composer ever losing the control.

Chopin remains Chopin, his “Mazurka” is as appropriate to this program as it would be to any program, anywhere, by the end of time.

Cerrone’s “Double Happiness” is formal and precise, adagio in spirit, even when it seems to pick up speed. The music carries us along, even if it does not move forward.

This program will be played at 3 p.m. on Sunday, November 13 at the Ventura County Museum in Ventura; 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 15 at the Huntington Museum in San Marino; 8 p.m. Thursday, November 17 at Zipper Hall at Colburn School in Los Angeles; and 7:30 p.m. on Friday, November 18, in the Fleischmann Room at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History (while the Hahn Room is being renovated).

Admission to all sites is $68. For tickets and other information, go to the box office, call Camerata Pacifica at 805-884-8410, email tickets@cameratapacifica.org, or visit www.cameratapacifica.org.

Masks and proof of full and booster vaccinations are required at all Camerata Pacifica concerts.

– Gerald Carpenter covers the arts as a Noozhawk Contributing Writer. He can be contacted at gerald.carpenter@gmail.com. The opinions expressed are his own.

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Tomberlin will bring contemporary folk to Ventura this weekend | Music https://harpmaker.net/tomberlin-will-bring-contemporary-folk-to-ventura-this-weekend-music/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/tomberlin-will-bring-contemporary-folk-to-ventura-this-weekend-music/ “They thought I was their queen but I said no no you gotta rule yourselves with kindness and patience,” Sarah Beth Tomberlin (who records as Tomberlin) recently tweeted during a break from drove with his band through the endless prairies of Wyoming. . The “they” in question, as shown in the accompanying video, is a […]]]>

“They thought I was their queen but I said no no you gotta rule yourselves with kindness and patience,” Sarah Beth Tomberlin (who records as Tomberlin) recently tweeted during a break from drove with his band through the endless prairies of Wyoming. .

The “they” in question, as shown in the accompanying video, is a procession of squirrel-sized prairie dogs, each approaching her in turn, standing on their hind legs, and waiting to be hand-fed with a carrot. “I have never been happier in my life than I was just now,” added the 27-year-old singer-songwriter, whose bright eyes and cheerful smile made it clear show.

Tomberlin’s outlook is a little less cheerful on his second album I Don’t Know Who Needs to Hear This…, which was released on Conor Oberst’s Saddle Creek Records label.

“Won’t you cover my eyes?” / I don’t know who to be / I don’t know what to see,” she sings on the haunting “Possessed,” while “Happy Accident” offers tongue-in-cheek lines like “I wanna burn it all down / Could I borrow a light?”

The latter is accompanied by a black and white video in which Tomberlin emerges from a dark forest – wearing a black hooded cape and chainmail sweater, wielding a sword, tarot cards and a handful of mushrooms – to ride an eerie empty subway car before traversing a city where she stares wide-eyed at skyscrapers. At the end of the video, she is in a room with a dog walking backwards. Think Joan of Arc and Lord of the Rings, with a bit of Twin Peaks for good measure.

The sublimely melodic arrangements on the album, meanwhile, call to mind artists like Low, Elliott Smith and Nick Drake in their most moody moments. When you combine that with a voice that deserves comparisons to Joni Mitchell and Judy Sills, it’s easy to see why her music has over 600,000 monthly listeners on Spotify.

Critics have shown no less enthusiasm, with one British publication going so far as to liken her songs to “talking therapy sessions”, a comparison she doesn’t particularly like.

“I feel like a lot of singer-songwriters understand that,” she said. “It’s like, ‘Oh, it must be so therapeutic for you to write this cathartic confessional song.’ I’ve told a lot of other women and non-binary people about this it’s like they dumb down work like it’s not work it’s just a journal entry that I I’ve turned it into a song. I’m not saying you’re saying that, but those kind of words don’t really get thrown around, you know, Bob Dylan or someone like that. I’m still writing a song and it’s still working. I makes it and it’s helpful. It’s not like I’ve written a journal entry and I’m like, ‘Hmm, pretty good today, I’m going to do a song.’

When played alongside his mostly acoustic debut album At Weddings and EP Projections, Tomberlin’s I Don’t Know Who Needs to Hear This… has a fuller band sound, complete with synthesizer, pedal steel, wood , drums and guitar riffs directly. from Neil Young’s playbook.

“‘Powderfinger’ by Neil Young is one of my favorite songs,” said Tomberlin, who has covered it – along with songs by Joanna Newsom, Alex G and Porches – on past solo tours. “I really want to bring covers into the current set, but it’s my first time touring with a band, and so it’s really like locking down the songs that are mine. So we’re going to be running this record for quite a while, and then it’s going to be fun to switch it up.

In the meantime, fans can go online to check out a faithful cover of Low’s “Words,” which she recorded for SiriusXM with fellow Brooklyn neighbors DIIV. Which brings up another topic that we know has come up in previous interviews: While Low’s Mimi Parker and Alan Sparhawk are both devout Mormons, Tomberlin is the daughter of a Baptist preacher who drifted away from religion when she was still a teenager, which is not always easy. things to do.

“The church was my whole growing community,” recalls the musician, who grew up in Fairfield, an Illinois town of less than 5,000 people. “So in getting away from that, I had to find other things to connect to. People and music have always done that for me, they’ve always connected me to myself. And so, you know, it was a blessing to make music, to put it online and to have the right people to find it. And that’s why I live in Brooklyn now. It’s not because I wanted to live in New York – in fact, I never wanted to live in New York – but I live here because the community is so rich, meaningful and useful. People really care about each other and engage in things that are new to them, and that’s exciting to me.

“So yeah, of course, leaving the church created a little hole in my life, but it was filled,” Tomberlin said. “It’s kind of a wild journey to sort this out on your own, and I’m grateful for all of that. You know, it made me who I am. And I’m pretty okay with who I am.

Tomberlin opens for Tegan and Sara on Friday, Nov. 11 at the Majestic Ventura Theater, 26 S. Chestnut St., Ventura. Doors open at 7 p.m. For tickets and more information, call 805-653-0721 or visit www.venturatheater.net.

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Podcast | row of National Gallery buildings; contemporary art in Lagos; Chagall’s Fallen Angel https://harpmaker.net/podcast-row-of-national-gallery-buildings-contemporary-art-in-lagos-chagalls-fallen-angel/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 12:21:06 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/podcast-row-of-national-gallery-buildings-contemporary-art-in-lagos-chagalls-fallen-angel/ This week: outcry over plans to build the National Gallery in London – is it a sensible makeover or like ‘an airport lounge’? We talk to National Gallery director Gabriele Finaldi about the gallery’s controversial plans to modify its Sainsbury’s Wing, and Rowan Moore, architecture critic at the Observeron his take on architect Annabel Selldorf’s […]]]>

This week: outcry over plans to build the National Gallery in London – is it a sensible makeover or like ‘an airport lounge’? We talk to National Gallery director Gabriele Finaldi about the gallery’s controversial plans to modify its Sainsbury’s Wing, and Rowan Moore, architecture critic at the Observeron his take on architect Annabel Selldorf’s designs and how they respond to Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown’s original post-modern building.

Guest viewing Etinosa Yvonne’s installation, winner of The Access Bank ART X Prize 2019

Courtesy of Art X Lagos

Tokini Peterside-Schwebig, Director of Art X Lagos, talks to us about the contemporary art scene in Nigeria’s most populous city and how the fair is tackling the climate emergency, as devastating floods make havoc in West Africa.

Marc Chagall The Falling Angel (1923/1933/1947)

© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2021, Photo: Martin P. Bühler

And the Work of the Week for this episode is that of Marc Chagall The Falling Angel (1923/1933/1947), the centerpiece of a new exhibition at the Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, Germany.

• Read more about the Sainsbury’s wing controversy here

Art X Lagos, federal palaceLagos, Nigeria, November 5-6

• Chagall: World in turmoil, Schirn KunsthalleFrankfurt, Germany, until February 19, 2023

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Stand Out For Good, Inc. Announces Two Executive Hires for New Brand of Contemporary Homes https://harpmaker.net/stand-out-for-good-inc-announces-two-executive-hires-for-new-brand-of-contemporary-homes/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 12:41:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/stand-out-for-good-inc-announces-two-executive-hires-for-new-brand-of-contemporary-homes/ National fashion retailer adds Sean Connelly and Marc Dvorak at San Francisco-team based Knoxville, Tenn., November 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Stand Out For Good, Inc., parent company of popular women’s fashion brand altar state and recently announced a new contemporary home brand, welcomes Sean Connelly as chief operating officer and Marc Dvorak as design director […]]]>

National fashion retailer adds Sean Connelly and Marc Dvorak at San Francisco-team based

Knoxville, Tenn., November 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Stand Out For Good, Inc., parent company of popular women’s fashion brand altar state and recently announced a new contemporary home brand, welcomes Sean Connelly as chief operating officer and Marc Dvorak as design director of the new home concept.

Connelly and Dvorak have over 50 years of combined experience in the fashion retail and home furnishings industries, specifically dealing with product development and curation, inventory management and team growth for a variety of well-known brands.

Connelly most recently served as COO of luxury furniture brand Serena & Lily, leading the company’s sourcing, inventory management, distribution, transportation and customer service. Connelly also managed the entire furniture category for Restoration Hardware.

Prior to joining Stand Out For Good, Inc., Dvorak served as senior vice president of product development and curation at Restoration Hardware for over a decade. Previously, Dvorak served as senior vice president of global store design for Gap Inc., where he designed babyGap and Old Navy prototypes. He has also designed stores around the world for Ralph Lauren situated at New York.

“We are thrilled to welcome Sean and Mark to the Stand Out For Good, Inc. family as we continue our exciting growth in the contemporary lifestyle space,” said Aaron WaltersPresident and CEO of Stand Out For Good, Inc. “Their extensive experience, leadership, and deep knowledge of the luxury home furnishings industry are key to building a successful new home brand. We have a team outstanding in place.”

Connelly and Dvorak join brand president Tana district in Stand Out For Good, Inc. San Francisco Desk.

About Stand Out For Good, Inc.
Stand Out For Good, Inc. is a family of inspirational, purpose-driven fashion and lifestyle brands rooted in the community and committed to giving back. From welcoming experiences and warm associates to carefully curated products in-store and online, Stand Out For Good, Inc. represents 128 Altar’d State stores, 36 Arula stores, eight Vow’d stores and five Tullabee stores in 39 states. Stand Out For Good is built on the founding principles of giving back and making a difference in the world. Locally in communities nationwide and globally as well, Stand Out For Good, Inc. has partnered with over 4,000 nonprofit organizations that provide food, clothing, resources, education and love to children in need. To learn more about the Stand Out For Good, Inc. family of brands, visit their websites at www.altardstate.com, arula.com, weddingvows.com, tullabee.com and asrevival.com.

Media Contact:
Laura MansfieldAPR
tombras
[email protected]
865.599.9968

SOURCE Stand Out For Good, Inc.

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Passion in Black and White: Love Burns Achromatically in Artnet Auctions’ Latest Post-War and Contemporary Sale https://harpmaker.net/passion-in-black-and-white-love-burns-achromatically-in-artnet-auctions-latest-post-war-and-contemporary-sale/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 23:02:09 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/passion-in-black-and-white-love-burns-achromatically-in-artnet-auctions-latest-post-war-and-contemporary-sale/ The story’s creators relied on powerful contrast to reflect the dual nature of passionate love: how else to convey its simultaneous depths of pain and heights of pleasure, but in black and white? Poet Frank O’Hara in his 1950s magnum opus Meditations in case of emergency summoned the image of a pale white glow on […]]]>

The story’s creators relied on powerful contrast to reflect the dual nature of passionate love: how else to convey its simultaneous depths of pain and heights of pleasure, but in black and white? Poet Frank O’Hara in his 1950s magnum opus Meditations in case of emergency summoned the image of a pale white glow on Saint Serapion’s post-mortem face – done in painting primarily by Francisco de Zurbarán – to explain the acute euphoria and doom he feels when he kisses the “alone man” whom he adores “unshaven”. For O’Hara and his artistic offspring, this mimetic contrast between black and white, generating a singular warmth close to a chiaroscuro of Zurbarán, immortalized personal and cultural passions, of an almost religious, unfathomable temperature.

Andy Warhol, Mark of the Beast (Positive) and Mark of the Beast (negative) (1985-1986). Live now in post-war and contemporary art on Artnet Auctions. East. $120,000 to $180,000.

O’Hara’s contemporary, Andy Warhol, also wrestled with a desire so strongly inflamed that only the energy of immensely separated chromatic distances – but united on the canvas – could evoke his own as in O’Hara’s words. “love without limits”. Warhol met Paramount executive Jon Gould in 1980, and until Gould’s death and afterward, Warhol faced a piercing acumen around his sometimes unrequited sexual desire: “Then the phone rang and c It was Jon who called as if nothing had happened, as if it hadn’t happened”. I didn’t go away for the weekend and didn’t call once,” he lamented in a June 1981 diary. Gould contracted pneumonia in 1984, at the start of the AIDS crisis in New York. ; and historians have recently reanalyzed Warhol’s late-career theological work in response to the metropolitan emergency. Gould died of the disease in 1986, and it is perhaps no exaggeration to read a temporal connection between Gould’s death and the black-and-white message in Warhol’s 1985–86 mark of the beast. His biblical reckoning of love and loss was so intense that it charged Warhol’s blood with a flashing pulse, visible in his searing graphic style of liquid polymer, ever closer “to the number of the beast: for c is the number of a man; and his number is six hundred and sixty-six” (Revelation 13:18).

Adam Pendleton, Untitled (About us) (2019). Live now in post-war and contemporary art on Artnet Auctions. East. $150,000 to $250,000.

The struggle to shape a revised theology that penetrates deep into the body, blending the nuances of the hottest point of a candle flame and its fleetingly extinguished wick, is a quest that persists in queer painting today. . It is therefore not surprising that artist Adam Pendleton’s pursuit of such spiritualism led him to devote social and spiritual activist Ruby Sales At the movie theater. Sales, in 2016, expressed a need to touch what is magnificent inside, at times when one wonders where it hurts. Where Saint Serapion’s incandescent glow through the shadows provided O’Hara with both a grave for his love and a path from which to depart to freedom, “springing like the lotus – the ecstasy of forever bursting forth! ” – Pendleton’s syntactical jets of black on white emit the brilliance of a love so daringly delicate, it can momentarily detach the soul from limitation; and through this achromatic make-up, her burning passion blossoms through pressing questions of identity in Untitled (Who are we?). Vertical stacks of fine chords flow downwards like a musical score tilted on the infinite axis of a Christian cross, or a keyboard stretched to the edge of emotion. The inscrutable puddles of midnight cut from language, then layered, evoke Pendleton’s sense of a poetry so extraordinary that it must, at its physical core, break with the world.

Raymond Pettibon, Untitled (It goes without…) (1990). Live now in post-war and contemporary art on Artnet Auctions. East. $18,000 to $24,000.

A thriving, yet rapidly and repeatedly incinerated incantation of life defines punk expression both sonically and visually – and Raymond Pettibon is an oracle for 1990s emblems of violently haunted love that cries out in black and white, sweating with uncontrolled seduction. Pettibon manages to convey what his friends Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore of Sonic Youth represent about a romance so precarious it could dissolve in a field of searing pain, with the unpredictable speed of a car crash: “I can’t move, it’s all about broken… pain, white light , blinded… a guy over there kneeling in the blinded mirage of white light.” In Untitled (It goes without…) (1990), Pettibon turns to Tolstoy Anna Karenina to reflect accordingly on the type of “burning ember” the group has canonized. A man’s muscular back heroically kneels as if momentarily emerging from an “excruciatingly painful period of time” (In the Kingdom #19, 1986) which could perhaps be compared to that of Count Vronsky; suffering at the end of the novel, he sees Karenina scarred as “a withered flower he picked, hardly recognizing in her the beauty for which he picked and ruined her.” In Pettibon’s distinctive hand, his Vronsky emanates with warmth, knowing the dark power of the extremes of his love to inflict hellish, lustful doubt.

Browse these works and more by Harold Ancart, Vivian Springford and Sherrie Levine in the Post-War and Contemporary auction, live through November 2.

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Love Hurts: A Consideration of the Life and Chicago Works of Gregory Bae at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago https://harpmaker.net/love-hurts-a-consideration-of-the-life-and-chicago-works-of-gregory-bae-at-the-museum-of-contemporary-art-chicago/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 12:00:30 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/love-hurts-a-consideration-of-the-life-and-chicago-works-of-gregory-bae-at-the-museum-of-contemporary-art-chicago/ Installation view, “Chicago Works: Gregory Bae”, MCA Chicago/Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago White, puffy clouds roll and swirl against a brilliant blue sky at the opening of the 1993 film “Groundhog Day” – a brewing storm, perhaps. The swirling staging foreshadows supernatural conditions to come in the classic rom-com and sets the stage for […]]]>

Installation view, “Chicago Works: Gregory Bae”, MCA Chicago/Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

White, puffy clouds roll and swirl against a brilliant blue sky at the opening of the 1993 film “Groundhog Day” – a brewing storm, perhaps. The swirling staging foreshadows supernatural conditions to come in the classic rom-com and sets the stage for ‘Chicago Works: Gregory Bae’ at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, in a pair of delicate pencil renderings. In the film, the cloudy sky gives way to the protagonist, Phil Connors, delivering a deadpan weather report before becoming trapped in an endlessly repeating day. Faced with an eternity to himself, Phil becomes obsessed with winning the affections of his weather show producer, Rita. In what is widely cited as one of the most philosophical and witty endings to a popular American film, Phil irresistibly confesses his love: “No matter what happens tomorrow, or for the rest of my life, I am happy now because I love you.” The seething clouds reappear as Phil is freed from his personal hell in a world where time moves on forever.

To love, argues “Groundhog Day”, is to give oneself over and over again to the ceaseless shuffling of the world, to live without possession or promise – “to love life is to love the fact that it goes”, according to the National Review editor Richard Brookhiser. This heartbreaking theme is the basis of the exhibition, thanks in part to Bae’s “Black Hole of Love” (2016) drawings, laying out the film’s opening and closing scenes on large sheets of paper separated by tears. capillaries and held together by clear acrylic sheets.

The drawings, titled for an English translation of the film’s Korean title, reflect Bae’s sustained interest in time, love, and loss, metaphysically and through his experience as a first-generation Korean American. Reading “Black Hole of Love” autobiographically is no exaggeration – born in Salt Lake City, Utah on Groundhog Day, February 2, 1986, Bae often traveled between the United States and South Korea, adopting the themes of distance, separation and the complex negotiations of identity and nationality in her work. In “Black Hole of Love”, the translation is adopted as a clue to the pain and breakdown of communication across space and time – the meaning of “Groundhog Day’s” message of hope becomes something more sinister and menacing. A crack, embodied in the physical tears through the drawings, appears in the shimmering moral of the film, the enduring love becoming less heroic than futile, sucked into the voracious “black hole” of time. Bae sees this neat American parable fall apart, capturing a freeze frame of a world where love is only allowed to exist when it already incorporates its own loss. A world that consumes love, darkly, leaving few opportunities for a different future.

Installation view, “Chicago Works: Gregory Bae”, MCA Chicago/Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

Nolan Jimbo, who organized the presentation of Bae’s works at the MCA, clearly sees a similar theme in “24-7, 365 (#5)” (2017). The sculpture consists of a Goodyear tire rolling endlessly on a slow treadmill, painted with fuzzy bands of red, yellow and blue, reminiscent of the sam taegeuk, a variation of the symbol on the South Korean flag. Jimbo sees sculpture as a scene of failure: failing to represent, failing to move forward, failing to achieve. This failure, writes Jimbo, is a corollary of the American imaginary of Asian immigrants as “hyper-productive, undifferentiated, and barely visible sources of labor” driven by ever-quickening expectations.

The apparent pessimism of “24-7, 365 (#5)” (2017) is joined, curiously, by an intense and fantastical optimism described in a memoir published by Newcity shortly after the artist’s death in 2020. Friends describe Bae and her work as unwaveringly romantic and hopeful, embracing the erasure of love not as a dark, never-ending drudgery, but as a promise made over and over again to meet the world. Poet Jean Yoon reflects that Bae’s work “felt like a set of coded instructions on how to finally put my heart back together and get back into the world to tell the tale”. “24-7, 365”, notes writer Erin Toale, resulted in “at least one marriage”, an effect Bae considered “a personal achievement”.

Installation view, “Chicago Works: Gregory Bae”/Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

Combining an eye toward perpetual failure with bittersweet affirmation and the realization of love through loss is what makes Bae’s work feel so unusual and uniquely piercing. “All Will Be Mine” (2015) is another love letter to loss. A pair of atomic clocks are installed facing each other on opposite walls with preparatory sketches. The clocks are made up of round glass engraved with raindrops suspended mid-drop, on which thin, pale second hands are held at noon by a stack of magnets the size of a watch battery. As the hands try to move forward, the magnets pull them home, causing an amazingly human thrill. Time is held in a nervous standstill, a tragic dance directly reminiscent of Felix Gonzales-Torres’ “Untitled (Perfect Lovers)” (1991), a set of two wall clocks installed side by side and allowed to flow together into the future, while slowly getting out of sync.

Gonzales-Torres’ clocks reflect the physical asynchrony of two lovers dedicated to an offbeat life, at the mercy of a time made fleeting and precarious during the AIDS epidemic. The tragedy of “All Shall Be Mine,” on the other hand, is not that the two clocks might fall out of sync, but that they are doomed to be frozen together. The attempt to stop time, to avoid the eventual digression of the two bodies, produces the zombie tic that warns that the anticipation of failure also prevents life. Bae suggests instead that we willingly offer our love to the black hole, and that the object finds fulfillment in its own loss, not in its preservation.

In this vein, “Ex Radios” (2019) and “Shadows of Thought (Mango Coconut Island, Butterscotch and Fresh Linen over Seojin circa 2014 – 2016)” (2019) by Bae offer gutted and separated familiar objects, order and coherence giving way to absence and chaos. “Ex Radios” is a pasted scroll of practical manuals for assembling objects with which the artist “had a strong relationship” but without language or instruction. The remaining voids are arranged in a lively symphony resembling a complicated score or an incredibly dense urban map and, at times, monochrome constructivism. “Shadows of Thought” is more playful and childish, a discarded electronic screen gummed up with layers of caramel candies, a popsicle stick and bits of wrapper and yarn – a victim, perhaps, of a thousand years on the floor of a beloved minibus.

Installation view, “Chicago Works: Gregory Bae”/Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

The two works of art, once useful and rational objects at the end of their useful capacity, inspire a kind of admiration, like Rembrandt’s anatomy students marveling at the complex system of veins and muscles inside the human body. The separation of these objects, in one case careful and systematic, and in the other seemingly haphazard, seems to commemorate the importance and significance the objects once carried, while giving equal respect to their dissolution. Feminist theorist Luce Irigaray writes about this encounter between the entropy of the world and the transcendence of love as a space of “wonder”, which is “only possible when one is faithful to the perpetual newness of oneself , on the other, of the world. Faithful to becoming… the passion for the encounter between the most material and the most metaphysical… between the mortal and the immortal. The meaning of love is fulfilled in the inability of the body and its passions to withstand the test of time, the wonder of the ephemeral and the fragile.

“Chicago Works: Gregory Bae” is a powerful testament to Bae’s wonder at the intersection of life and love – an invitation to turn towards, rather than away from, pleasure and pain. endings that make beginnings so worthwhile. In this way, Bae provides a life plan, sensitive to the time we have and refusing to turn away from each breaking day. (Emeline Boehringer)

“Chicago Works: Gregory Bae” is on view at MCA Chicago, 220 East Chicago, through January 29, 2023.

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The Athletes House by AR Design: a balance between contemporary and traditional https://harpmaker.net/the-athletes-house-by-ar-design-a-balance-between-contemporary-and-traditional/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 06:40:23 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/the-athletes-house-by-ar-design-a-balance-between-contemporary-and-traditional/ Being an architect not only requires excellent design skills, but often also a lot of empathy in terms of being able to understand client needs and translate them into something tangible. In many cases, architects must also act as peacemakers and mediators, because customers – especially if they are in a relationship – do not […]]]>

Being an architect not only requires excellent design skills, but often also a lot of empathy in terms of being able to understand client needs and translate them into something tangible. In many cases, architects must also act as peacemakers and mediators, because customers – especially if they are in a relationship – do not always agree on the proposals they make. But as we always say, challenges are the driving force behind all great projects, and The athlete’s house was no exception.
This project – completed in fall 2021 by the Winchester-based company architecture firm AR Design – was born out of the clients’ shared desire to expand and transform their 1950s home, as they describe themselves as “Polar oppositesin the things they love and the way they live, as the architects note in their press release.
If they have agreed on the fundamental principles of what they wanted – namely expanding the living space on the ground floor to open up their seventy-year-old home to the garden and create an additional bedroom on the first floor, as well as the addition of a gym and a swimming pool – they had very different ideas about how it was supposed to be donewhether or not to retain the existing 20th century house and poor quality fragmentary additions to the sides and rear.
Tom Ford and Andy Ramus at AR Design therefore asked themselves the question: “What to do when a couple wants two different things; we want to live in a traditional house and we want to live in a contemporary house? Hence their proposal: to build a new house on the back of the old one in order to make the two clients happy. This decision involved reorienting the interior layout, with key spaces now located in the new construction physically connected to the garden.
The new volume contrasts the old box-shaped house with a series of walls and roof planes that define the spaces without enclosing them. The extension of the masonry from the interior to the exterior, large-format glazing with wooden slat sunshades, and continuous flooring were used as design tools to blur the boundary between interior and exterior. outside, in response to their request for a new dialogue with the garden, which features a lush green lawn and an impressive collection of tall trees. The swimming pool and gym, essential for triathlon training, are located to the side, with one end of the pool embedded in the new volume.
A circulation corridor runs along the intersection of new and old housing, helping to create a rational and logical spatial structure throughout. As always, the architects of AR Design made sure to pay meticulous attention to the existing georgian style house. They created a bold double-height entry space that houses a bent steel staircase and bookcase, contrasting with the period sash windows while giving a hint of the contemporary formal language of the rear addition. The architects say the rest of the house”has undergone a more traditional renovation, with each room updated for 21st century living standards. The bathrooms, bedrooms and sitting area have all been refurbished, retaining period features and sash windows in accordance with one of the clients’ preferences. All of this, of course, in compliance with the latest environmental and energy saving standards.
In conclusion, we can say that taking into account the wishes and differences of the clients, the extension and the renovation of AR Design have made the property a spectacular family home that perfectly suits their active lifestyle and their individuality.

Christiane Burklein

Project: design in augmented reality
Location: Hampshire, UK
Year: 2021
Images: Martin Gardner

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The slippery slope of contemporary pedagogical philosophies https://harpmaker.net/the-slippery-slope-of-contemporary-pedagogical-philosophies/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/the-slippery-slope-of-contemporary-pedagogical-philosophies/ Many of our teachers have started to change the way they teach, whether to better connect with the “TikTok generation” or to assess us based on “more holistic criteria”. So, as students, we have become accustomed to the new style of work based on quantity rather than quality, and when we are asked to perform […]]]>

Many of our teachers have started to change the way they teach, whether to better connect with the “TikTok generation” or to assess us based on “more holistic criteria”. So, as students, we have become accustomed to the new style of work based on quantity rather than quality, and when we are asked to perform at a higher level, i.e. previously average, we are not always able to do this.

I will not call specific classes, but I will define a spectrum of pedagogy that roughly extends from traditional to new wave. The old way is basically to use a few substantial deliverables and maybe some class participation to make up the bulk of your grade. For example, an English class in which you write three 2,000-word articles and discuss a new novel every two weeks, or a computer science class with a midterm, final, and programming assignment every two weeks. weeks.

The new way is, to put it succinctly, everything everywhere at once. Consider, in a social studies class: a weekly post on the Sakai forum, readings twice a week, a few “longer” reading responses, taking turns leading a class discussion and/or a “creative” final project “. In a STEM course: readings for each term, a flipped classroom, projects, short assignments and labs with overlapping deadlines, many short quizzes, as well as shorter or take-home tests.

There is a difference between saying something and having something to say; spending more time doing tasks that require less of me, intellectually, seems counterintuitive. There’s no need to go beyond the minimum level of commitment, so it’s almost silly to go the extra mile to master the material rather than just getting by. When doing the least is enough, why risk doing anything else?

I feel like my intelligence is not respected when professors don’t consider me and my peers capable of doing more than just regurgitating course material and taking the next step intellectually to perform at a higher level. I’m pretty sure we all learned to read and summarize in elementary school, so I’d be curious to know the benefits of this style of teaching. I’ll be honest, I can’t stand these kinds of classes, and I’m now doing my best to avoid them as much as possible.

From what I understand, the professors think we like the new way of teaching – or we can’t handle the old one – and if that’s the first thing you’re exposed to university, you could base your expectations on it. It can also be difficult to do this heavy intellectual work once you get used to the new method. As students, we recognize that these new wave courses shouldn’t be taken seriously – just listen to your Pratt friends talk about their Trinity humanities requirements. Unfortunately, it also helps to reinforce the idea that some topics are less important than others.

I didn’t have what I would consider an actual paper, programming project, or exam until my second semester, because that first fall was all about new-style classes. Since I didn’t know Duke before the pandemic, I can’t say for sure how much it has changed the way our teachers teach, but at the time it was great; college was easy. This startling simplicity was in part due to the nature of virtual college classes during the pandemic and the fact that activities outside of school were limited. It might be difficult to reintroduce old standards after they have been naturally lowered due to the pandemic; however, those courses are definitely not finished yet, and once I started needing to take them, I got a hell of a wake-up call. My expectations were low, so putting my effort into reaching a reasonably placed bar felt unnecessarily painful.

I realized that personally, I learn when I have time to think. When I have more than a few days left for an assignment, I can spin it around in my head instead of having to grind it as quickly as possible. I don’t feel like this when I rush to write a forum post or finish interactive textbook activities an hour before they’re due, or when I have to teach myself all the necessary concepts before I can get started. the pair of assignments that are due two days apart.

Academic classes are similar to exercise. Just because you look like you’re putting in a lot of work doesn’t mean you’ll improve. you have to push yourself to progress, but you also have to be intentional about how much time you spend on it. Maybe being forced to sink or swim once in a while isn’t the worst thing – as long as a course is fair in its rigor, it can help you figure out what you like about it. learn more. Duke’s courses that have stood the test of time pushed me to synthesize the material to some intellectual degree, not just skim through the many superficial tasks to complete them.

As students, we should demand to be taken seriously and given work that will challenge us, not be tested on how many balls we can juggle simultaneously. I realized that if I want to learn things here, I have to actively seek out the kinds of courses that will force me to think, synthesize, and grow. We shouldn’t vilify teachers for trying to push us to work harder, nor should we just give 5 stars on Rate My Professors if a class was easy. On the other hand, professors should respect the abilities of us students and teach us in a rigorous but not necessarily task-oriented way. Our expectations adjust according to what is expected of us, but once we get used to the methods of the new wave, we may find it difficult to go back to the old, addressing those age-old fears. that led to the educational changes in the first place.

Heidi Smith is a junior from Trinity. His column is broadcast on Tuesdays alternately.

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