Book selling – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 12:20:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://harpmaker.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Book selling – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ 32 32 The daughter of a revolutionary becomes a wedding planner. The drama ensues. https://harpmaker.net/the-daughter-of-a-revolutionary-becomes-a-wedding-planner-the-drama-ensues/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 10:00:03 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/the-daughter-of-a-revolutionary-becomes-a-wedding-planner-the-drama-ensues/ OLGA DIES DREAMINGBy Xochitl Gonzalez What’s the American Dream these days, anyway? The term, as coined in 1931 by James Truslow Adams, described an idealistic view of the United States as a true meritocracy, where opportunities were equally available to all. Ninety years and a lot of systemic racism and widening class divisions later, we […]]]>

OLGA DIES DREAMING
By Xochitl Gonzalez

What’s the American Dream these days, anyway? The term, as coined in 1931 by James Truslow Adams, described an idealistic view of the United States as a true meritocracy, where opportunities were equally available to all. Ninety years and a lot of systemic racism and widening class divisions later, we have good reason to take a more blind eye on the concepts of opportunity and equality in this country, and, being Since even the most enterprising of billionaires can’t seem to find satisfaction in any amount of accumulated wealth, it’s worth asking what, exactly, we’re supposed to be dreaming about.

Olga Acevedo, the main character in Xochitl Gonzalez’s debut novel “Olga Dies Dreaming”, struggles with this question. Daughter of Puerto Rican activists – a mother who disappeared into an underground life as a revolutionary when Olga was 12 and a father became heroin addict and died of AIDS – Olga was raised by her grandmother in Brooklyn, excelled in public schools from New York. and graduated from an unnamed Ivy League college. As the book opens in the summer of 2017, she is, at 39, a sought-after high-end wedding planner. His older brother, Prieto, is a progressive congressman and divorced father who also happens to be a locked-in homosexual, a secret that has made him vulnerable to blackmail by infamous (and very not progressive) real estate developers.

Although she is, on paper, a self-taught success story, Olga is also stuck and depressed. After a brief and disastrous foray into reality TV, she “realized she got distracted from the real American dream – making money – by her phantom cousin, building up fame.” But the job of showing off the matrimonial whims of the rich, even if she figured out how to take advantage of it, has become “tedious and stupid.” Disdainful of her clients and frustrated by the financial disadvantage of strict ethics, Olga embarks on shady business: filling orders for alcohol and caviar and selling the surplus. She does this even though she has noticed that money seems to bring little satisfaction to her clients, that “the mere fact of existing seems like a huge burden to them.” She has no real friends, seeks loveless sex with an ultra-wealthy libertarian whose daughter she has previously planned to marry, and although she is involved and supported by her extended family in Brooklyn, she is moreover sleepwalker in a life as confined as that of his brother.

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The goal setting book you never thought you needed https://harpmaker.net/the-goal-setting-book-you-never-thought-you-needed/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/the-goal-setting-book-you-never-thought-you-needed/ How to start Michael Bungay Stanier Many of us are lost. Despite the availability of Google and Apple Maps, we are often likened to a deer caught in the headlights. The latest book by bestselling author Michael Bungay Stanier, How to get started: start doing something that matters, not only does it help you get […]]]>

Many of us are lost. Despite the availability of Google and Apple Maps, we are often likened to a deer caught in the headlights. The latest book by bestselling author Michael Bungay Stanier, How to get started: start doing something that matters, not only does it help you get off the ground, but this is possibly the best book on goal setting and goal achievement.

Using his wonderfully self-deprecating humor and omnipresent wit, Michael asks a clear and straightforward question from the start: What is your laudable goal? He aims to help you not only find, refine, and achieve a goal, but he also wants the goal (s) to be “exciting, important, and intimidating.” As you can see, Michael doesn’t mess with language.

Language and humor aside, Michael artfully walks you through the book through a nine-step process integrated into a three-phase goal setting and completion approach. Also think of Michael as a companion on your trip. He’s literally by your side in the form of comic book icons, providing you with tips and tricks (and undertones of pop culture) along the way.

There are also spaces in the book for you to complete tasks that will improve the way you set (and do) your goals. Also bring a pencil to your reading sessions. I found myself correcting some of my initial thoughts as I progressed through the book.

As a bonus, Michael provided all kinds of great spreadsheets with the click of a QR code. So take a look, as they are quite handy.

The three phases and the nine stages of the process that make up How to start are the following:

Phase I: Set a laudable goal

1. Find your focus

2. Test your ambition

3. Claim your goal

Phase II: Get involved

4. See where you are

5. Weigh the status quo

6. Weigh the trip

Phase III: crossing the threshold

7. Take small steps

8. Remember your best self

9. Don’t travel alone

Michael and I sat down to discuss the book, and you can watch this short interview in its entirety below:

Michael’s vulnerability is also fully on display throughout the book. It’s one thing to write a book about goal setting, but it’s another to point out the ups and downs, ups and downs of two unique experiences in the author’s life.

First and foremost, Michael sets himself a laudable goal of creating a top-notch new podcast. By drinking your own champagne, that outrageous goal becomes a more laudable goal – in the midst of writing the book – to become: “launch a new podcast that is in the top 3% of all podcasts within 12 months.” I won’t spoil the outcome in this column, but following Michael’s journey of goal setting and completion is heartwarming as a reader.

Second, Michael also reveals his ambition to hand over the reins of the company he founded several years ago, Box of Crayons, to a new CEO. The goal is ultimately defined as “a gracious, generous and confident model of power transfer”. This business example provides the reader with a different context of goal setting and completion, which many teams or organizations will no doubt appreciate.

Michael has a unique writing style that often softens the blow of your underlying inadequacies. I have used the book to help me reset what I do with my own business – going through the nine step process to be much more specific about a business that should be exciting, important, and intimidating.

How to start also contains a wonderful nod to believe and express your best. The “This / Not That” section – found in 8e Step “Crossing the Threshold” – prompts you to ask what manifests in you “when you are in your game and when you are slightly behind?” This handy tool is useful when aiming to achieve the goal, in knowing full well what can help or hinder you from accomplishing it.

In short, How to start is an excellent book. In fact, it is partly a book, partly a workbook, partly a field guide, but above all partly a behavior change manual. This is the type of book that is sure to get you started and reach a goal.

_______

Check out my 4th book, “Lead. Care. To earn. How to become a leader that matters.”Thinkers50 Ranked # 1 Thinker, Amy. C. Edmondson of Harvard Business School calls it “an invaluable roadmap”. A self-paced online leadership development masterclass is also available. Almost 100 videos through nine practical lessons in leadership.

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10 new books we recommend this week https://harpmaker.net/10-new-books-we-recommend-this-week/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 22:32:14 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/10-new-books-we-recommend-this-week/ FEELING AND KNOWLEDGE: Making Minds Conscious, by Antonio Damasio. (Pantheon, $ 26.) In his latest book, the neuroscientist expands on his ideas on the importance of feeling – which he believes can bridge the conceptual chasm between body and mind. When feelings and images come together in the brain, he says, the result is conscious […]]]>

FEELING AND KNOWLEDGE: Making Minds Conscious, by Antonio Damasio. (Pantheon, $ 26.) In his latest book, the neuroscientist expands on his ideas on the importance of feeling – which he believes can bridge the conceptual chasm between body and mind. When feelings and images come together in the brain, he says, the result is conscious thought. “As Damasio expands magnificently on the theme of sentiment,” writes Jim Holt in his review. “The master scientist unites with the silky prose stylist to produce one exciting glimpse after another. … He was brilliantly successful in bridging the gap between body and mind.

BURNING BOY: The Life and Work of Stephen Crane, by Paul Auster. (Holt, $ 35.) Several biographies of Crane have been published over the past century, but none resemble this one. Auster, the esteemed postmodernist, took it upon himself to restore his subject to his rightful place in the canon. It is often fascinating to see a contemporary writer engage so deeply with one of his ancestors. “In the end, Auster leaves no doubt about the genius of Crane,” writes Charles McGrath in his review. “He was truly a prodigy, and his voice and his style – sharp, observant, devoid of morality or sentimentality – was something quite new in American letters.”

WHERE ARE YOU FROM, by Sasa Stanisic. Translated by Damion Searls. (Tin house, paper, $ 17.95.) This autobiographical novel traces the story of a family after the break-up of Yugoslavia. With a dry mind and a jumble of genres, the narrator looks back on his years in Germany and revisits the Bosnian village where his ancestors are buried, a world transformed by war. “Damion Searls’ translation does justice to Stanisic’s dry-witted and linguistic game, and captures the tense undercurrents that form throughout the book,” writes Irina Dumitrescu in her review. “Although it goes through trauma, ‘Where You Come From’ is also funny and moving. … Ordinary and accidental, this is the quiet beauty of immigrant life.

THE INTERMEDIATE, by Wolfgang Hilbig. Translated by Isabel Fargo Cole. (Two-line press, $ 22.95.) C., the antihero of Hilbig’s novel, is an alcoholic writer who left East Germany a few years before the fall of the Berlin Wall. In a flurry of travel and frenzy, he is both enticed and repelled by the novelties and permissiveness of the West – a funny but anguished mind caught between competing worldviews. “It cannot be easy for a writer to recognize that his sensitivity has been irrevocably shaped by a world that has been deeply compromised and is no longer relevant,” Caleb Crain writes in his review, “even though ‘ it must be said that this is more or less the fate of any writer who has had the misfortune to survive his youth.

EDGE JUSTICE: The death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the rise of Amy Coney Barrett and twelve months that transformed the Supreme Court, by Linda Serre. (Random house, $ 28.) Greenhouse, the dean of Supreme Court reporters, traces a year of rulings in the 2020-21 term – the court’s first since Amy Coney Barrett replaced Ruth Bader Ginsburg – and gestures towards major cases ahead . In his review, Noah Feldman says that “no one can recount court decisions as accessible and intelligent as Greenhouse” and points out that, because the court dodged many important questions during the period in question, the book has an air of anticipation: ‘Justice on the Brink’ is literally a book about the highest court (and Barrett) about to do extreme things, like overthrow Roe. … If all or part of this drama occurs in the months and years to come, one can only be comforted to know that Linda Greenhouse will be here to write about it.

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ITV viewers Anne ‘desperate’ to buy book after hit drama as copies sell out and prices skyrocket https://harpmaker.net/itv-viewers-anne-desperate-to-buy-book-after-hit-drama-as-copies-sell-out-and-prices-skyrocket/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 22:49:58 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/itv-viewers-anne-desperate-to-buy-book-after-hit-drama-as-copies-sell-out-and-prices-skyrocket/ ITV’s new drama Anne has captured the hearts of the nation as they recap the events of the Hillsborough disaster with the book now much-requested by fans. The drama followed activist Anne Williams, played by Maxine Peak, who fought for many years for her son Kevin, one of 97 football fans who died in the […]]]>

ITV’s new drama Anne has captured the hearts of the nation as they recap the events of the Hillsborough disaster with the book now much-requested by fans.

The drama followed activist Anne Williams, played by Maxine Peak, who fought for many years for her son Kevin, one of 97 football fans who died in the disaster.

His 15-year-old son Kevin made it to the FA Cup semi-final Liverpool against Nottingham on April 15, 1989 and tragically never returned home.

For more TV information, visit our dedicated home page

As expected within minutes of the first episode, viewers took to Twitter to share their grief as the drama unfolded.



ITV Anne Actress Maxine Peake

As the third episode of the four-part series continues, the book, which came out some time ago, is now in high demand with viewers unable to find a copy.

Since the popular ITV show, the book now costs £ 69 on Amazon – well over its suggested retail price – and is currently not available for purchase.

The book is now in high demand and fans have taken to social media for help finding a copy.



Hillsborough disaster books

@ TrishB_585 tweeted: “#Anne didn’t know there was a book. I just searched on Amazon. They want £ 69 for this !!! ”

@Robotlara commented: “I hope there will be a reprint of the #Anne book. It sells for £ 69 on Amazon rn!

Amazon Prime has thousands of original series, sports documentaries, and movies that you can subscribe to watch here for just £ 7.99 / month, plus a month’s free trial included.

Disney + is here in the UK and if paid for an annual subscription can save viewers 15%, giving you access to Disney and Pixar movies and popular series like The Mandalorian. New O2 customers, or existing customers who upgrade their plan, can get up to 6 months free of Disney +.

Additionally, Apple TV offers a free trial for seven days, but don’t forget that the subscription will renew automatically at £ 4.99 / month, so don’t forget to cancel if you don’t want it anymore.

Netflix is ​​available on your smartphone, tablet, smart TV, laptop or streaming device, all for a fixed monthly fee. Plans range from £ 5.99 to £ 13.99 per month. No additional costs, no contracts.

@ salty1980 when asked: “Is Anne’s book available in ‘real life’? I can’t find it online. #Anne. “

@ChubbologyScot added: “@ITV I think there should be a reprint of Annes book… I’m desperate to read it! @MPeakeOfficial is exceptional #Anne #Hillsborough.

One viewer suggested the book was still in stock for £ 9.99 at Waterstones – but maybe not for long.

For the latest Yorkshire Live email updates Click here

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WATCH NOW: New owner says bookstore is rooted in community | Business https://harpmaker.net/watch-now-new-owner-says-bookstore-is-rooted-in-community-business/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/watch-now-new-owner-says-bookstore-is-rooted-in-community-business/ STEVE CAHALAN For La Crosse Tribune Pearl Street Books and its owner Beth Hartung Beth Hartung, the new owner of Pearl Street Books at 323 Pearl St., says she is rooted in the community. Indeed, the words “Rooted in Community” appear on the new logo of the bookstore, just like the words “Est. 2000 “and […]]]>

STEVE CAHALAN For La Crosse Tribune

Pearl Street Books and its owner Beth Hartung



Beth Hartung, the new owner of Pearl Street Books at 323 Pearl St., says she is rooted in the community.

Indeed, the words “Rooted in Community” appear on the new logo of the bookstore, just like the words “Est. 2000 “and an illustration of an oak tree.

“I really want this value to be lived,” said Hartung, who bought the company from founder Jim Auler in September. “I want this to be a place where the community can come together, where we help educate the community. “

The company has a number of places for people to sit and read or visit each other, including on the mezzanine level which opened in early 2017 when Hartung started working for Auler at the independent bookstore.

“Pearl Street Books needed a place where people could sit and relax and read a book, where you could have book club meetings,” Hartung recalls. “So we emptied the mezzanine”, which was used to store books. “And we’re opening it up as a place for people to sit and relax.”

People also read …

Hartung also helped the bookstore increase its social media presence.

“Jim was looking for someone at some point who he would be comfortable selling the store to because he wanted to make sure it could continue to thrive,” Hartung said.

This led Auler to sell the company to him and retire. “He will always buy (used) books for me, when he’s on the go,” Hartung said. “So if he sees a real estate sale or something, he’ll stop” and buy some books for the store. “And he’s there if I ever have any questions.” Now he’s my consultant.

Auler had opened the Wees-Kon-San bookstore at 108 Fifth Ave. N. in 1998. In 2000 he moved the store to its present, much larger location and renamed it Pearl Street Books.

“I think Jim’s (business) model was really good,” Auler said of the store, where she hosted events.

“We had live music here,” she said. “With COVID, it’s difficult because I want to keep people safe.”

It encourages but does not require customers to wear face masks inside the store. “We have a large supply of free masks” in case a customer needs them, she said.

“Some of my friends played music in the store, just to create an atmosphere where people might come in and talk,” Hartung said. “We encourage people to sit down and read. You don’t have to buy a book. You can just go in and grab a used book from the shelf and sit down and read it.

“Authors have also come here to do book dedications or talk about their book,” Hartung said. “We had a few to try and test the waters and see how we can keep people safe by distributing them.”

She hopes to resume book club meetings that haven’t recently been held at the store due to concerns over COVID-19.

Pearl Street Books has an inventory of approximately 55,000 books. About 95% of them are used, Hartung said

The store has a number of old books (at least 100 years old).

It also has special sections, such as one for books on Wisconsin, another for books on neighboring states, and another for books by local authors.

“We also buy books from our customers,” Hartung said. “We’ll do it with store credit or cash. We recommend that you call ahead and make sure I’ll be there ”if anyone wants to sell a book at the store.

Hartung, who has three part-time employees, said Pearl Street Books also sells items such as jewelry, postcards and locally made artwork on consignment.

Hartung said his store and others nearby act like good neighbors by promoting themselves to customers. “It makes a huge difference if you shop at a local location,” she said. Local store owners hire local people and often know their customers’ first names, she said.

Pearl Street Books has done well this year despite the COVID-19 pandemic, Hartung said.

“People may have a little more time to read” because of the pandemic, she said. “But I also think there has been a shift in our community when it comes to buying local. I think people buy gifts or gift cards here to support a local business. We have had a great month.

Hartung grew up on a Dunn County dairy farm and received a bachelor’s degree in political science and a master’s degree in education, both from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. She held education and nonprofit jobs before entering the book business.

“I wanted to own a bookstore since I was little,” Hartung said.

“I like people,” Hartung said. “It’s a happy place because you find books for people. It’s good environmental business because we try to keep the books out of the landfill and reuse them. And we help expand the world of people through books. Most people who walk into a bookstore are so nice and wonderful.

Pearl Street Books draws customers from as far away as the Twin Cities; Rochester, Minnesota; and Madison and Milwaukee, Hartung said. She said they are drawn to the store by “A great selection, good prices and a beautiful environment. And people keep saying they don’t see bookstores like this, even in Madison.

The bookstore is a tenant in the historic J. Burgermeister building, built in brick in 1885. The building is being renovated by Meraki Properties, LLC, who purchased it in 2020.

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First edition of Harry Potter book sold for record $ 471,000 – Oakland News Now https://harpmaker.net/first-edition-of-harry-potter-book-sold-for-record-471000-oakland-news-now/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 05:24:11 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/first-edition-of-harry-potter-book-sold-for-record-471000-oakland-news-now/ Oakland News Now – The first edition of the Harry Potter book sold for a record $ 471,000 – video made by the YouTube channel with the logo in the upper left corner of the video. OaklandNewsNow.com is the original blog post for this type of video blog content. HarryPotter #HarryPotterauction #HarryPotterbook A first edition […]]]>

Oakland News Now –

The first edition of the Harry Potter book sold for a record $ 471,000

– video made by the YouTube channel with the logo in the upper left corner of the video. OaklandNewsNow.com is the original blog post for this type of video blog content.

HarryPotter #HarryPotterauction #HarryPotterbook A first edition of the book Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone sold for a record…

via IFTTT

Note from Zennie62Media and OaklandNewsNow.com: This video blog post shows the full, live operation of the latest updated version of an experimental network of Zennie62Media, Inc. mobile multimedia video blogging system that was launched in June 2018 This is an important part of Zennie62Media, Inc.’s new and innovative approach to news media production. What we call “the third wave of media”. The uploaded video is from a YouTube channel. When the YouTube video channel for Yahoo Finance uploads a video, it is automatically uploaded and automatically formatted on the Oakland News Now site and on social media pages created and owned by Zennie62. The overall goal here, in addition to our is the real-time on-scene reporting of news, interviews, sightings and events all over the world and in seconds, not hours – is the use of the network existing YouTube social. graphic on any topic in the world. Now the news is reported with a smartphone and also by promoting the current content on YouTube: no heavy and expensive camera or even a laptop is needed, nor to have a camera crew to film what is already on Youtube. The secondary objective is faster and very inexpensive production and distribution of media content information. We have found that there is a lag between the length of the post and the production time and revenue generated. With this the problem is much less, but by no means solved. Zennie62Media is constantly striving to improve the system’s network coding and is looking for interested multimedia content and technology partners.

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Frenchman Houellebecq returns to politics with his eighth novel: 9781581451112: books https://harpmaker.net/frenchman-houellebecq-returns-to-politics-with-his-eighth-novel-9781581451112-books/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 14:53:24 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/frenchman-houellebecq-returns-to-politics-with-his-eighth-novel-9781581451112-books/ Hugues Honoré and Adam Plowright (AFP) Paris, France ● Thu, December 30, 2021 2021-12-30 21:51 0 0c06e8ca436d6e21bba3a7085601ad12 2 Books French, author, novel, bookshop, politics, books To free Best-selling French author Michel Houellebecq returns to the theme of politics and power in his highly anticipated eighth novel, which will hit French bookstores next week. The philosophical […]]]>

Hugues Honoré and Adam Plowright (AFP)

Paris, France ●
Thu, December 30, 2021

2021-12-30
21:51
0
0c06e8ca436d6e21bba3a7085601ad12
2
Books
French, author, novel, bookshop, politics, books
To free

Best-selling French author Michel Houellebecq returns to the theme of politics and power in his highly anticipated eighth novel, which will hit French bookstores next week.

The philosophical thriller is set during a fictional presidential election campaign in 2027, with characters who bear obvious resemblances to current politicians, including President Emmanuel Macron.

Houellebecq, whose dark and ironic work is known for its depressed and often misogynistic male characters, has previously written about French politics in his 2015 novel. Submission, who imagined the country ruled by a Muslim president.

Title Annihilate (Destroy), the book will be released on January 7 with a large initial print run of 300,000 copies, with translated versions to appear later.

Although situated in the world of Parisian politics, Houellebecq reflects on important questions such as death, ill health, and the meaning of life in a society that lives largely without the spiritual ballast provided by religion.

While he made a name for himself with often nihilistic and sex-obsessed characters in books such as Atomized Where Platform, the last offering of the enfant terrible of French literature contains traces of love and even hope.

“You don’t have to celebrate evil to be a good writer,” Houellebecq told Le Monde in an interview on Thursday. “There are very few bad people in ‘Destroy’ and I’m happy for that.”

“The ultimate triumph would be not to have bad people at all,” he said.

The comments are likely to spark speculation the chain smoker in his 60s, who secretly married for the third time in 2018, is mellowing with age.

Dreary France

Houellebecq is often outspoken about French politics, and the book will be scrutinized for his views on Macron and others ahead of the presidential election slated for April.

Despite the small number of “bad people”, the France of 2027 in her novel is predictable, beset by tensions caused by inequality as well as the slow death of rural communities.

“The gap between the ruling classes and the population has reached unprecedented levels,” the narrator said at one point, according to an early copy seen by AFP.

Once the darling of the French liberal left, Houellebecq has continued to drift to the right, flirting with the far right in recent years.

He was accused of being Islamophobic after the publication of Submission, which led him to go into hiding due to death threats.

When asked by a reporter if he was, he replied: “Probably”.

He also hailed Donald Trump as a “good president” for his unconventional diplomacy and hostility to free trade, in an essay for Harper’s magazine in 2019.

Pirated copies of 736 pages Annihilate in the form of PDF documents began circulating on the Internet in December, which led the French publisher Flammarion to take legal action.


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Stacey Abrams’ amazing words on Amazon – SheKnows https://harpmaker.net/stacey-abrams-amazing-words-on-amazon-sheknows/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 19:40:19 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/stacey-abrams-amazing-words-on-amazon-sheknows/ If you purchase an independently rated product or service through a link on our website, SheKnows may receive an affiliate commission. Inspiring the next generation of leaders is nothing new to Stacey Abrams. The 2022 Georgia gubernatorial candidate and voting rights activist has had an extraordinary political career – and she’s just getting started. But […]]]>

If you purchase an independently rated product or service through a link on our website, SheKnows may receive an affiliate commission.

Inspiring the next generation of leaders is nothing new to Stacey Abrams. The 2022 Georgia gubernatorial candidate and voting rights activist has had an extraordinary political career – and she’s just getting started. But part of his undeniable impact has been his bond with young children who admire him and feel empowered by his example. Now her first picture book is here to encourage even more young readers, and it’s available now for just $ 15.99 on Amazon.

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Stacey’s extraordinary words is Abrams’ new children’s book, and it’s perfect for your little future leader. Illustrated by Kitt Thomas, this book has already become a no. 1 best seller on Amazon. The book is perfect for ages 4-8, with images highlighting a story inspired by Abrams’ own childhood. In Stacey’s extraordinary words, Stacey is a little girl who enjoys learning all she can about words, whether it’s reading, spelling, or the comfort she finds there when times get tough.

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Image: Balzer + Bray
Balzer + Bray.

But when Stacey’s teacher takes her to the local spelling contest, Stacey starts to get nervous and even doubts her love of the language. With great determination, little Stacey learns that she can overcome anything and meet any challenge that comes her way. Stacey’s extraordinary words is absolutely perfect for young readers, and parents might even learn something too! Now that it’s finally available on Amazon, be sure to add this inspiring picture book to your child’s library – order it today.

Various children’s books featuring black and brunette girls that every kid should read

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Jonathan D. Spence, Chinese Folk Researcher, Died Aged 85 | News from USA® https://harpmaker.net/jonathan-d-spence-chinese-folk-researcher-died-aged-85-news-from-usa/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 01:56:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/jonathan-d-spence-chinese-folk-researcher-died-aged-85-news-from-usa/ By HILLEL ITALIE, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) – Jonathan D. Spence, a British-born historian who went on to become a longtime Yale University professor and eminent sinologist and drew a large following with his 1990 bestseller “The research of modern China, “died at the age of 85. . Spence, who retired from Yale in […]]]>

By HILLEL ITALIE, Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) – Jonathan D. Spence, a British-born historian who went on to become a longtime Yale University professor and eminent sinologist and drew a large following with his 1990 bestseller “The research of modern China, “died at the age of 85. .

Spence, who retired from Yale in 2008, died Saturday at his home in West Haven, Connecticut. His wife and fellow Yale professor Annping Chin said the cause was complications from Parkinson’s disease.

A recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, a Los Angeles Times Literary Award, and numerous other honors, Spence has written more than a dozen books on China, as well as reviews, essays, and lectures. He was best known for “The Search for Modern China,” an 870-page publication that began in the 17th century, at the height of the Ming Dynasty, and continued through the 1989 protests in the square. Tiananmen.

As the title of the book suggests, Spence approached China as if he was writing a detective story, deciphering for Western readers one of the largest, most populous, and most complex countries in the world. Drawing on dozens of previous books and original articles, he documented China’s history in terms of extreme upheaval and enduring traditions. He noted the “models of generational deference and concepts of obligation” and the rebellions designed to break them, whether it was the dismissal of Beijing in 1644, the fall of the last emperor in 1911, or the Communist triumph of late 1940s.

Political cartoons

“We can see how often the Chinese people, operating under difficult if not desperate circumstances, have seized their own plight and threw themselves against the power of the state,” he wrote. “We see how in 1644, again in 1911, then again in 1949, the disillusionment of the present and a certain nostalgia for the past could combine with a passionate hope for the future to bring down the old order, opening up the way to an uncertain transition to the new.

Spence’s book has received critical acclaim, reached the New York Times bestseller list, remains widely used in classrooms, and is often credited with popularizing Chinese studies.

“It tells a story that is always alive, always concrete, always understandable, no matter how complex the problem is,” wrote the Times’ Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, who added that the book “will undoubtedly become standard text on the subject.” .

Spence’s other works included a short biography of Mao Zedong for the Penguin Lives series; “Le Grand Continent du Chan”, which examined how Westerners viewed China, and “The Palace of Memory of Matteo Ricci”, about one of the first Jesuit missionaries in China. A 1996 book, “The Chinese Century: A Photographic History,” was co-authored by Spence and Annping Chin.

Survivors include two sons from his first marriage, Helen Alexander, and two stepchildren.

Born in Surrey, England, Spence grew up in a family of book lovers: his father was a publisher, his mother a reader of French literature. He was an undergraduate student at Clare College, Cambridge, where he edited the student newspaper and co-edited the student magazine Granta, today one of the most prestigious literary journals in the world.

After graduation, he received a scholarship at Yale and befriended Chinese researcher Mary Wright, who became a mentor. Through Wright, he met biographer Fang Chao-ying and gained special access to documents in Qing Dynasty Taiwan, materials used in his dissertation and his first book, “Ts’ao Yin and Emperor K’ang -hsi: Bondservant and Master ”, which came out in 1966, the same year he joined Yale faculty.

“I was able to hold the original writings of the Emperor of China in my hand,” he said in a 2010 interview with Humanities magazine, the internal publication of the National Endowment of the Humanities. “It was something that is still very moving for me, and it was a major moment for my reflection on the past.”

Spence was one of Yale’s most popular teachers, and much of “The Research of Modern China” spanned his class talks. One former student, award-winning Chinese journalist and scholar Susan Jakes, would remember Spence speaking at a measured and fascinating pace, touching on big themes and precise details.

“The lectures felt like finely crafted short stories and sometimes complete novels. They were seductively titled “The View from Below”, “Everything in the Translation”, “In the World”, “Bombs and Pianos” – and they built in intensity to end with surprising revelations or verses. of quietly delivered poetry, ”Jakes wrote. in 2008 for the site www.thechinabeat.com.

“His lectures promised that China and its past could be, if not entirely within our grasp, at least a little closer than it seemed. … I am sitting in Shanghai as I write these lines, as certain as one can be about the historical causes and effects, as if I had not found my way to this conference hall in the spring of 1995 , or if Spence had given a talk on astrophysics or Luxembourg, I wouldn’t be here.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Willie Garson found a home playing canonical ‘gay best friend’ https://harpmaker.net/willie-garson-found-a-home-playing-canonical-gay-best-friend/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 21:52:55 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/willie-garson-found-a-home-playing-canonical-gay-best-friend/ The image goes viral, or as viral as it gets in the summer of 2007. We see the body of a gigantic silver-backed mountain gorilla hoisted high on crisscrossing branches and carried by at least 14 men through the bush. The dead gorilla is tied with vines to secure its arms and legs. Its prodigious […]]]>

The image goes viral, or as viral as it gets in the summer of 2007. We see the body of a gigantic silver-backed mountain gorilla hoisted high on crisscrossing branches and carried by at least 14 men through the bush. The dead gorilla is tied with vines to secure its arms and legs. Its prodigious belly is also surrounded by vines and its mouth is stuffed with leaves. The photograph seems to be the end of a film whose beginning we do not yet know. It weighs 500 pounds – a black and silver planet in the middle of the green. Although we can’t see this part, some of the men are crying.

The gorilla’s name is Senkwekwe, and he is well known to porters, many of whom are park rangers who call him “brother”. He is the dominant male of a family called the Kabirizis. (The American primatologist Dian Fossey was instrumental in the study of the complex dynamics of these family units.) They are a troop accustomed to humans: gentle, curious, playful and often happy to welcome visitors, tourists. and the rangers who protect them. Now, here in their home range, on the slope of the Mikeno volcano in Virunga National Park in eastern Congo, many of them have been murdered by armed militiamen trying to scare the rangers away and take control. from old-growth forest to charcoal. manufacturing. In a solemn procession, the dead gorillas are taken to the rangers field station.

The photograph, taken by Brent Stirton for Newsweek, appears in newspapers and magazines around the world, alerting others to the issues park wardens know so well: the need to protect gorilla habitat, the bloody battle for resources (gold, petroleum, charcoal, tin and poached animals), the destabilizing presence of armed rebel groups as well as the Congolese army within the borders of the park. Although the park is a World Heritage Site, more than 175 park rangers have been killed here over the past 25 years. What is also not visible in this photo is that only one gorilla survives the massacre, a baby found next to its slain mother, one of Senkwekwe’s companions, trying to suckle her breast.

The baby – a 2-month-old, five-pound, adorable female – is dehydrated and near death herself, so a young ranger named Andre Bauma instinctively places her against her bare chest for warmth and comfort and dabs her gums and his tongue with milk. He brings her back to life, sleeps, feeds and plays with her around the clock – for days, then months, then years – until the young gorilla seems convinced that he, Andre Bauma, is his. mother.

André Bauma also seems convinced.

Senkwekwe, Ndakasi’s father, after being found dead in 2007.
Brent Stirton

The baby gorilla, begotten of murdered parents, is called Ndakasi (en-DA-ka-see). Because no orphan mountain gorilla has ever been successfully returned to the wild before, she spends her days in a park sanctuary with a group of other orphan gorillas and their keepers, swinging from the tall branches, munching on wild celery, even learning to finger paint, mostly oblivious to the fact that she lives in one of the most contested places on the planet. She is exuberant and a ham and demands to be carried by her mother, Andre Bauma, even as she grows to 140 pounds and he almost gives way under her weight.

One day in April 2019, another ranger takes a selfie with Ndakasi and her best friend, Ndeze, both standing in the background, one with a protruding stomach and both with whassup expressions. The cheeky blunder on humans is almost too perfect, and the image is posted to Facebook with the caption “Another day at the office. …”

The photo explodes immediately, because we love that stuff – us and them together in one picture. The idea of ​​mountain gorillas imitating us for the camera skips borders and species. We are more alike than different, and it appeals to our imaginations: ourselves existing with a fascinating, perhaps more innocent, version of ourselves.

Mountain gorillas exhibit dozens of vocalizations, and Bauma always vocalizes with Ndakasi singing and growling and the growling belching that signals contentment and security. Whenever there are gunshots near the shrine, Bauma makes sounds to calm Ndakasi. He himself lost his father in the Congo War. Now he tells her it’s just another day in their simple Eden.

“You have to justify why you are on this earth,” Bauma says in a documentary. “The gorillas are the reason why I am here.”

A park warden taking a selfie with Ndakasi and a friend in 2019.
Mathieu Shamavu / Virunga National Park

Ndakasi turns 14 in 2021 and spends his days healing Ndeze, clinging to Bauma, vocalizing with him. Mountain gorillas can live up to 40 years, but one spring day she gets sick. She loses weight, then some of her hair. It is a mysterious disease which increases and decreases, for six months. Vets from an organization called Gorilla Doctors arrive and, during repeated visits, administer a series of medical interventions that appear to make small improvements. Just when it looks like she is going to recover, however, Ndakasi takes a bad turn.

Now his gaze only reaches right in front of her. The wonder and playfulness seem to have faded, her concentration having turned inward. Brent Stirton, who has returned to the Virunga about every 18 months since photographing the massacre of the Ndakasi family, is visiting and taking pictures judiciously. The doctors help Ndakasi to sit down at the table where they are treating her. She vomits into a bucket, is anesthetized. Bauma stays with her all the time; finally, she is taken to her enclosure and lies down on a green sheet. Bauma is lying on the bare floor next to her.

At one point, Bauma leans against the wall, then she crawls onto her knees, with the energy she has left, rests her head on his chest and sinks into him, placing her foot on his foot. “I think that’s when I could almost see the light leaving his eyes,” Stirton said. “It was a private moment no different from being with a dying child. I did five frames with respect and walked out.

One of the latest photographs goes viral, spreading the sad news of Ndakasi’s death to the world. What do we see when we look? Pain. Trial. Death. And we also see great love. Our capacity to receive and to give. It is a fleeting moment of transcendence, a gorilla in its mother’s arms, two creatures united to make one. It’s deeply humbling, which the natural world bestows, if we let it.

Bauma’s colleagues draw a tight circle around him in order to prevent him from having to talk about Ndakasi’s passing, though he issues a statement praising his “gentle nature and intelligence,” adding: “I loved him like a child”. Then he goes back to work. Death is everywhere in Virunga and there are more orphan gorillas to care for. Or maybe it’s the other way around.

Michael Paterniti is a contributing writer for the magazine.

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