American book – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 05:05:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://harpmaker.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png American book – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ 32 32 Marino de Medici, dean of foreign correspondents in Washington, dies at 89 https://harpmaker.net/marino-de-medici-dean-of-foreign-correspondents-in-washington-dies-at-89/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 03:52:30 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/marino-de-medici-dean-of-foreign-correspondents-in-washington-dies-at-89/ Marino de Medici, an Italian journalist who reported from Washington for more than a quarter century, became dean of the foreign press and distinguished himself as a blind observer of American politics, died on 15 November at his home in Winchester, Virginia. He was 89 years old. The cause was cancer, said his wife, Nicki […]]]>

Marino de Medici, an Italian journalist who reported from Washington for more than a quarter century, became dean of the foreign press and distinguished himself as a blind observer of American politics, died on 15 November at his home in Winchester, Virginia. He was 89 years old.

The cause was cancer, said his wife, Nicki Furlan de Medici.

Mr. de Medici arrived in the United States in 1954 as a university student under the Fulbright Scholars program, an initiative championed by U.S. Senator J. William Fulbright (D-Ark.) in the aftermath of World War II to promote international understanding.

Mr. de’ Medici then spent most of his career as an interpreter of American life for Italian readers, primarily as a Washington-based foreign correspondent for Il Tempo, a center-right newspaper headquartered in Rome. . He covered presidents from John F. Kennedy to Ronald Reagan, the successes of the American democratic tradition and its stains.

“The role of a foreign correspondent,” de’ Medici told the National Journal in 1985, “is not just to report the news directly, but to clarify, analyze and explain what is happening to United States and to interpret its meaning and meaning for his country and the rest of the world, he becomes a player in a sophisticated game and influences politics.

When he retired, the New York Times reportedMr. de’ Medici had covered from Washington longer than any other member of the city’s foreign press, which at the time included 500 accredited reporters from 60 countries.

He covered the civil rights movement, traveled to Southeast Asia to report on the Vietnam War, and chronicled the Watergate scandal for an Italian readership more familiar than Americans with government instability. .

As revelations of the scandal pushed President Richard M. Nixon toward resignation, “I had a hard time explaining to the Italians,” Mr. de’ Medici told The Times, “that this was not a political maneuver to take control of the White House but a moral, constitutional and judicial matter where the end result was not dictated by politics but by the full force of law”.

Mr. de’ Medici made occasional detours from his assignment in Washington to cover world affairs, including coups in Latin America. But he seemed most at home in the US capital, where he lived for years and dropped off his dispatches from the National Press Building.

One of the advantages of being a foreign correspondent was the remoteness of its editor. “If you’re lazy,” he joked, “you can just rewrite The Washington Post and nobody will notice.” But M. de’ Medici was proud of his role not only as a scribe but also as an analyst of democracy.

“I love American politics – the interaction of politics with public opinion,” he told The Times. “In the final analysis, it’s public opinion that decides, and that’s uniquely American.”

Marino Romano Pietro Lorenzo Celso de Medici was born in Rome on May 16, 1933. He claimed no connection to the Florentine dynasty whose name he shared, although he once managed to sell property in the United States by se pretending to be Medici. prince. Many Italians perceive Americans as ignorant of history, a reputation that M. de’ Medici’s estate agents confirmed when they called him “de Medicini”.

M. de’ Medici’s father was a non-commissioned officer in the Italian navy and his mother was a housewife. During the Second World War, M. de Medici lived for a time with an aunt and uncle in Rome before fleeing the deprivations of the city to join his parents in Romagna, not far from the German defensive positions known as the Gothic line.

He was 11 years old, he wrote in a memento of the war, when he experienced an event which he said remained etched in his memory “like a huge boulder”.

“I cycled happily with my books in my backpack, having a good time on an old bicycle that I had borrowed from the owner of the farm,” he wrote. “Suddenly I heard a roar behind my back that made me stop and look behind me. And then I saw it, a black plane spewing sparks from its wings. Those sparks were bullets raining down on the road. It was an American plane.

Mr. de’ Medici was working for the Roman newspaper Il Messaggero when he received his Fulbright scholarship to study in the United States. He received a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Washington in 1955 and a master’s degree, also in journalism, from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963.

After completing his undergraduate degree, de’ Medici returned to Italy and began working for ANSA, the country’s main news agency, which sent him back to the United States to open an office in Washington in 1960. Four years later, he became a Washington correspondent. for Il Tempo.

At first, he recalls, he didn’t fit in with American journalists, with their salty manners and slovenly outfits. “I was a young green reporter who arrived in a country which, for me, was a great cathedral of journalism”, he said. told The Times. “I was wearing cologne and a gold chain and they thought I was very strange.”

Mr. de Medici retired from Il Tempo in 1987. He then returned to Rome to serve as director of communications for the International Fund for Agricultural Development, a United Nations agency. In 1998, he moved to Winchester, where he taught at Shenandoah University. He continued to write for Italian publications and the Northern Virginia Daily.

M. de’ Medici’s marriage to Marianne Bengtson ended in divorce.

Survivors include his 38-year-old wife, the former Nicki Furlan, and their two daughters, Laura de Medici and Marina de Medici, all of Winchester; and three grandchildren.

M. de’ Medici was the author of the book “SCRIBE: 30 years as a foreign correspondent in Americaas well as a book in Italian about Donald Trump and the risks that Mr. de’ Medici believed the former president posed to democracy.

After years of offering Italians an insider’s view of Washington, he offered Americans an outsider’s understanding of their country, one that had become his own as well.

The United States is “becoming less and less the democracy I knew, admired and wanted to live” when he arrived here, he told the Northern Virginia Daily in 2020.

But in past “crises of history,” America “has always emerged … and become stronger than before,” he added. “It’s going to have that again, I’m sure.” But we must close this abominable chapter of the worst presidency in the history of the United States. And who can say that with more confidence than a foreigner who knows this country very well?

]]>
Christopher Carter, “The Spirit of Soul Food”: Book Talk and Food Demonstration https://harpmaker.net/christopher-carter-the-spirit-of-soul-food-book-talk-and-food-demonstration/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 00:04:16 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/christopher-carter-the-spirit-of-soul-food-book-talk-and-food-demonstration/ by Illuminations: The Chancellor’s Arts and Culture Initiative Tue 29 Nov 2022 | 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. PST (GMT-8) Soul food has played a vital role in preserving Black history, community, and culinary genius. It is also a response and a marker of centuries of food injustice. Given the harm our food production system […]]]>

by Illuminations: The Chancellor’s Arts and Culture Initiative

Tue 29 Nov 2022 | 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. PST (GMT-8)

Soul food has played a vital role in preserving Black history, community, and culinary genius. It is also a response and a marker of centuries of food injustice. Given the harm our food production system inflicts on black people, what should soul food look like today?

Christopher Carter’s answer to this question merges a history of black American eating habits with a Christian ethical response to dietary injustice. Carter reveals how racism and colonialism have long driven the development of American food policy. The very food we grow, distribute and consume disproportionately harms black people in particular and people of color among the world’s poor in general. Carter reflects on how people of color can eat in a way that reflects their cultural identity while remaining true to principles of compassion, love, justice, and solidarity with the marginalized.

Meet Christopher and enjoy a meal celebrating the power of soul food, with commentary from Chef Jessica VanRoo.

Christopher Carter is an assistant professor of theology and religious studies at the University of San Diego and a pastor in The United Methodist Church.

Location detail:

Anteater Recreation Center (ARC), Anteater Test Kitchen, 2nd Floor

University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA

]]>
AASL Congratulates Rainbow Library https://harpmaker.net/aasl-congratulates-rainbow-library/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 18:10:43 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/aasl-congratulates-rainbow-library/ CHICAGO — Following a resolution submitted by the Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL), the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) has officially congratulated the Rainbow Library. The program is one of eleven outstanding programs, events, and products nominated by AASL chapters for their support of the school librarianship profession and the learners the profession […]]]>

CHICAGO — Following a resolution submitted by the Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL), the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) has officially congratulated the Rainbow Library. The program is one of eleven outstanding programs, events, and products nominated by AASL chapters for their support of the school librarianship profession and the learners the profession serves. To be considered, programs must align with the principles expressed in the national association’s mission and values ​​statements. The full list is available atwww.ala.org/aasl/commendations.

Melissa Corey, President of MASL, shared:

“The Rainbow Library is a GLSEN-sponsored program that provides free collections of LGBTQ+ affirmation texts to schools. Librarians and other school staff can request a set of books by grade level, including grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. Rainbow Library currently serves 26 states, including Missouri.

The Rainbow Library collections feature diverse voices, especially from BIPOC authors, with at least one Spanish-language book included in each collection. Ensuring students have access to LGBTQ+ books is extremely important in a time when LGBTQ+ books are routinely banned, censored, or removed from school library collections. The Rainbow Library literally saves lives, one book at a time.

“Rainbow Library has partnered with the Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL) to support LGBTQ+ learners across the state. This work aligns with the AASL’s core values ​​of collaboration and equity, diversity and inclusion,” said AASL President Kathy Lester. “Congratulations to the Rainbow Library for their collaborative work to see and support young LGTBG+.”

TheAASL Chaptersto provide a channel of communication between AASL-affiliated school library organizations and the AASL Board of Directors. An AASL Chapter nominates outstanding programs, events, and products for official AASL endorsements, which are then reviewed and approved by the AASL Board of Directors for national recognition.

The American Association of School Librarians,www.aasl.orga division of the American Library Association (ALA), empowers leaders to transform teaching and learning.

]]>
Biden renews US apology tour in Egypt https://harpmaker.net/biden-renews-us-apology-tour-in-egypt/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 20:32:49 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/biden-renews-us-apology-tour-in-egypt/ On Friday, President Joe Biden followed former President Barack Obama’s lead and apologized to other countries for the actions of the United States. “I apologize that we pulled out of the deal,” Biden told international leaders, referring to the 2016 Paris climate accord. The president apologized at a conference on the global warming in Egypt […]]]>

On Friday, President Joe Biden followed former President Barack Obama’s lead and apologized to other countries for the actions of the United States.

“I apologize that we pulled out of the deal,” Biden told international leaders, referring to the 2016 Paris climate accord. The president apologized at a conference on the global warming in Egypt as the United States celebrated Veterans Day.

The United States joined the agreement, intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, under the Obama administration. In 2020, however, the Trump administration pulled out of the deal, along with then-Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. saying the deal creates an “unfair economic burden on American workers, businesses, and taxpayers.” Critics of the deal said it did not affect China, the world’s biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, as much as the United States.

Biden’s apology recalls Obama’s much-criticized “apology tour” in 2009, during which he struck down his own country for being “arrogant” and “disdainful, even mocking” towards other nations.

Biden made several blunders even before arriving at the conference, the New York Post reported:

When a reporter asked him if he hoped the Russian-Ukrainian war would end soon, the president confused “Russia” with “Ukraine”, “Colombia” with “Cambodia”, and falsely said he was visiting “Cairo” in Egypt rather than Sharm el-Sheikh, about 300 miles away.

]]>
Comics: Superman: American Alien https://harpmaker.net/comics-superman-american-alien/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 23:23:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/comics-superman-american-alien/ November 5—Superman is an iconic character, but also a character that creators can use as a role model. This means that Superman is definitely certain things but big enough that certain creators can do different things with him. Even title a book “Superman: American Alien” with a tagline: “This is not a Superman comic.” And […]]]>

November 5—Superman is an iconic character, but also a character that creators can use as a role model.

This means that Superman is definitely certain things but big enough that certain creators can do different things with him.

Even title a book “Superman: American Alien” with a tagline: “This is not a Superman comic.”

And the title and tagline are correct.

Max Landis, who is better known as a screenwriter than a comic book scribe, created the miniseries a few years ago that brings something new to history’s most famous superhero.

Everything is familiar here but everything is different.

The Kents find an alien baby and raise it in the Midwestern town of Smallville. They name the boy Clark. He has powers. He eventually moves to Metropolis to make better use of these powers. He becomes a journalist. He meets Lois Lane. He has a secret identity. He flies, fights bad guys and helps people, dressed in a blue suit, with a red cape and a big yellow S. It’s Superman.

It’s all there, but so is Pa Kent a bit doubtful about raising a super-powered alien boy. Given the size of Smallville, everyone knows young Clark has powers but they keep them a secret when Clark moves to Metropolis.

Clark gets the idea to wear a costume when he meets Batman.

So many nuances that make the familiar story something new.

Really, “American Alien” is the coming-of-age of a good boy named Clark Kent, who happens to have superpowers and wants to do the right thing.

Each chapter of the Complete Edition of “Superman: American Alien” has a different artist, offering a different look at young Clark as he grows from a child to a grown man.

“American Alien” may not be a Superman story, but it has everything that makes a great Superman story.

]]>
Kanye, Trump and the return of overt anti-Semitism in the United States https://harpmaker.net/kanye-trump-and-the-return-of-overt-anti-semitism-in-the-united-states/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 12:45:34 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/kanye-trump-and-the-return-of-overt-anti-semitism-in-the-united-states/ Longtime anti-Semitism watchers say there’s nothing new about the kind of derogatory comments about Jews that rapper formerly known as Kanye West, former President Donald Trump, various candidates far-right politicians and others have held in recent weeks. But what has struck some pundits is how egregious the comments about Jews are at a time when […]]]>

Longtime anti-Semitism watchers say there’s nothing new about the kind of derogatory comments about Jews that rapper formerly known as Kanye West, former President Donald Trump, various candidates far-right politicians and others have held in recent weeks.

But what has struck some pundits is how egregious the comments about Jews are at a time when incidents of harassment, vandalism and violence against them are at their highest since at least the 1970s Recent data has already shown that a majority of American Jews fear violence against them.

“Empirically, something is different. The level of public animosity towards Jews is higher than it has been in recent memory,” Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, said in an interview.

Experts said the climate is the product of a stew of forces, including a digital culture that spreads misinformation and hatred, and right-wing political forces focused on protecting the status of white Christians. Some have said that current anti-Semitism is also aggravated by more people downplaying it as just an interfaith issue instead of a dangerous form of racism; in the past, majorities from Germany to America have made it clear that they regard Jews as a distinct and inferior race.

Trump’s long history of trafficking anti-Semitic tropes

To survivors alike the deadliest attack on Jews in US history – the 2018 massacre at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh – the most pressing concern is that the event, which left 11 dead and at minus six wounded, is already fading from public consciousness, ousted by the dozens of mass shootings that followed.

Barton Schachter, a Tree of Life member and former synagogue president, said, “That’s what scares me, that over time [the shooting is] just another thing. I’m afraid it’s drifting in that direction. I don’t know how to save him.”

He called West, now called Ye, “a fool…but he’ll fade eventually.” Another person will take his place. The question is, how do we continue to keep the good stuff alive? This is the difficult part. The memory of these 11 [who were killed at Tree of Life] and the 6 million [Jews who died in the Holocaust]this is the hardest part.

Some experts say the more and more uncovered anti-Semitism brings 2022 into line with much of Jewish history.

“For me, it’s like coming back from a 50-year vacation,” said Mark Oppenheimer, co-host of the Jewish podcast “Unorthodox” and author of the 2021 book “Squirrel Hill: The Tree of Life Shooting and the L soul of a neighborhood. “We’re back to ‘Keep your head down; nobody supports you. It’s not that we’re going back to real estate bans; it’s more like the old “It’s a little unseemly to be a Jew”.

But current attitudes toward Jews are complex and may appear to be heading in different directions, say observers of anti-Semitism. Overall, Americans hold fewer anti-Semitic views than 60 years ago. An ADL Index in which people are asked if they agree with a series of negative stereotypes about Jews has measured anti-Semitism since the 1960s, when 29% of Americans were considered anti-Semitic. In 2019, ADL’s most recent measurement year, the number was the lowest ever in the United States, 11%.

That same year, however, the ADL also tracked 2,107 incidents of vandalism, violence, and harassment toward Jews in the United States, which at the time was the highest number since the group began reporting. collecting data in the 1970s. (This record was broken in 2021.)

“While on a general level anti-Semitic attitudes have gone down, incidents have gone up because there is less shame. People feel like they can say and do anything,” Goldblatt said.

Shapiro emphasizes Jewish faith as he warns of Mastriano’s extremism

Benjamin Lorber, a longtime researcher on antisemitism at Political Research Associates, said the latest wave of antisemitic rhetoric “fits into this larger political project,” and he’s not surprised to see it in the news. approaching midterm elections this year. “The right is trying to regain the power it felt it lost in 2020, so it makes sense, in addition to virulent anti-LGBTQ bigotry, that anti-Semitism is once again in the mix,” he said. .

He and other experts noted that the 2018 Tree of Life massacre took place just before the 2018 midterm elections and that the suspect had posted on the far-right social media site Gab that he was angry with “dirty” Jews working to resettle refugees, especially Muslims.

“We are in a time where the boundaries of the MAGA movement of who is considered a real, good, authentic American are shifting and the future is very unpredictable,” Lorber said.

Trump attacks American Jews, says they need to ‘get a grip’ on Israel

Earlier this month, Trump attacked American Jews in a post on his Truth Social platform, saying Jews in the United States need to “pull themselves together” and show more appreciation for the State of Israel “before let it not be too late”. Trump has repeatedly raised the old anti-Semitic trope that American Jews hold, or should hold, a secret or dual loyalty to Israel rather than the United States. He said evangelicals are “much more grateful” for actions on Israel than Jews.

More Republicans said nothing about Trump’s Truth Social post. Trump also defended Ye in an Oct. 18 interview with Salem News Channel, and other conservatives also rallied in support of Ye, most often portraying him as a victim of the supposed efforts of Democrats, in combination with the media and businesses, to suppress opposing viewpoints. .

Fox News host Tucker Carlson in clips posted by Vice Newsdid not challenge Ye during an interview when the interpreter cited the doctrine of the movement known as Black Hebrew Israelites: that African Americans are the true descendants of the ancient Israelites, a belief often mixed with accusations that traditional Jews are not legitimate Jews.

“When I say Jewish, I mean… people known as the black race,” Ye told Carlson.

In the interview, Ye also said there was some “financial engineering” to being Jewish.

Anti-Semitism has also become a major issue in the Pennsylvania governor’s race between Republican Doug Mastriano, who promotes Christian nationalism, and Democrat Josh Shapiro, who is Jewish. Mastriano’s campaign advertised Gab. In a September campaign speech, Mastriano attacked Shapiro’s attendance at a private Jewish school in Bryn Mawr, in remarks that have been criticized as coded anti-Semitism. An adviser to Mastriano, former Trump lawyer Jenna Ellis, responded to the backlash by dismissing Shapiro as “a secular Jew at best.”

The Kanye West Tucker Carlson didn’t want his audience to see

Lorber said that in a time of widespread misinformation, economic insecurity and alienation, such comments fit into the narrative of a segment of Americans seeking to identify internal enemies, groups they perceive as not being American enough or, in the case of the Jews, part of an invisible power structure preventing them from succeeding or censoring them. When Adidas ended its partnership with Ye on Tuesday over his anti-Semitic remarks, some conservatives were quick to label him a victim of “woke capitalism.”

“They’re like, ‘Maybe Kanye is onto something,'” Lorber said.

Adidas acted in response to a public pressure campaign, and some observers said it was proof that efforts to push back against anti-Semitism are working.

David Baddiel, a British comedian and screenwriter, last year published a book called “Jews Don’t Matter” about the ramifications of anti-Semitism not being seen as an equally dangerous form of racism for others.

“Since writing the book, I’ve been hearing more and more people talk about anti-Semitism (although I see it growing),” Baddiel wrote to the Post. “I used to think that the concept of alliance, so important to progressives, would never apply to us… but I think that’s changing.”

Greenblatt, in a statement, hailed Adidas’ decision as “very positive” one that “creates consequences”, because brands today “mediate a large part of our lives”. Other brands, including Balenciaga and Gapalso cut business ties with Ye.

Deborah Lipstadt, the US State Department’s envoy on anti-Semitism, in a statement Wednesday highlighted the role of corporate accountability. She said “social media and online spaces have been dominated by dangerous and inflammatory anti-Semitic rhetoric in recent weeks.”

“I commend the stance that various companies and private platforms have taken against anti-Semitism, ensuring that their platforms are not used to spread hatred, cutting ties and ending lucrative business relationships with partners who indulge in it. Companies must continue to act responsibly and make it clear that touting hate is not profitable.

But Oppenheimer said people shouldn’t let corporate America deal with police bias.

“It’s fine when business leaders have a conscience,” he said, “but anyone who relies on the dictates of profit margins to enforce sound and moral standards is in trouble.”

Jeremy Merrill contributed to this report.

]]>
‘A crazy proposition’: Robert Draper on Trump, Republicans and January 6 | Books https://harpmaker.net/a-crazy-proposition-robert-draper-on-trump-republicans-and-january-6-books/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/a-crazy-proposition-robert-draper-on-trump-republicans-and-january-6-books/ Mid-December 2020, Robert Draper signed on to write a book on the Republican Party under donald trumpwho spent four crazy years in the White House but had just been beaten by Joe Biden. “Trump hadn’t conceded,” says Draper, from Washington, where he writes for the New York Times. “But it was expected to. The idea […]]]>

Mid-December 2020, Robert Draper signed on to write a book on the Republican Party under donald trumpwho spent four crazy years in the White House but had just been beaten by Joe Biden.

“Trump hadn’t conceded,” says Draper, from Washington, where he writes for the New York Times. “But it was expected to. The idea of ​​the January 6 uprising ‘Be there, be savage’ hadn’t taken hold yet. And so I thought the book would be about ‘a split Republican Party, more or less in line with When the Tea Party Came to Town, the book I did about the Class of 2010.’

“That all changed the first day I reported labor, which happened to be January 6, while I was inside the Capitol.”

The book has become Weapons of Mass Delirium: When the Republican Party Lost its Mind. It’s a detailed account of Republican dynamics since 2020, but it opens with visceral reporting from the scene of what Draper calls the “seismic travesty” of the Capitol attack.

Draper says, “I still get chills thinking about that day. It’s a Rashomon-like experience, isn’t it? There were a lot of people in the Capitol and they all have different points of view which are equally valid.

“Mine was of someone who just showed up thinking I would be covering this routine certification ceremony, ended up not being able to get into the press box, walked around the west side of the building and suddenly saw all these policemen under siege, getting macerated and beaten. After being there for a while, I escaped through the tunnels and went to the east side of the Capitol and watched people make their way inside.

In their book The Steal, Mark Bowden and Matthew Teague observe that those who attacked the Capitol had no better chance of overturning the election than the hippies of 1967 had of seeing the Pentagon levitate. Draper’s term “seismic parody” goes in the same direction. But it does not diminish the enormity of the attempt, of Trump’s rejection of democracy and the threat posed by those who support him.

His book joins a herd on January 6. One difference is that each chapter begins with an image by Canadian photographer Louie Palu, of January 6 and the days that followed. Rioters swarm. Politicians roam the corridors of power.

Draper says, “There’s a reason the subtitle isn’t How? ‘Or’ What the Republican Party has lost its mind, but instead when the Republican Party did. This is a snapshot in time. I happen to think it’s an incredibly important snapshot, but it’s not a dry historical recitation of how the Republican Party over the decades shifted from one mode of thinking to another.

Robert Draper at the United States Capitol. Photography: Louie Palu/Louie Palu ©

“It’s important to me to impress on readers that this is a low-key moment worth considering, a time when the Republican Party…rather than deciding, ‘Wow, we were co-conspirators , intentional or not, to a horrible event, and we need to do better,” instead went in a different direction.

“And for me, this is a time when democracy is now closed and therefore needs to be considered.”

Draper interviewed most of the major players, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, with his eyes on the president’s gavel after next month’s midterms. Asked if the man who wooed Trump with red and pink Starbursts and genuflections at Mar-a-Lago are the leader Republicans deserve, Draper replies cautiously.

“So there are two key words: ‘leader’ and ‘merit’. It depends on how you define either. He would be the leader in the sense that they would probably vote for him as speaker…but the question remains whether he will really lead or if he really has led.

“The important word is ‘merit’. And obviously, that requires judgment on my part. But I think what Kevin McCarthy embodies for me is the human refutation of the argument that Donald Trump hijacked the Republican Party, because to imagine that metaphor, you imagine the Republican Party as a plane taken by force, without any complicity, and that the plane was working perfectly well before. McCarthy is here to refute all of that.

“McCarthy was an absolute catalyst for Donald Trump. He never refuted the kind of lies his party embraced. He winked and nodded. People told me that he offered to create a new leadership position for Marjorie Taylor Greene. At a minimum, she’s likely to get Plum Committee assignments.

Greene, a far-right and conspiratorial Georgia congresswoman, was elected when Draper started work.

“I thought she would just be some kind of marginalized, sitting on the Star Wars bar of Republican politics, some kind of congresswoman who would be ousted after one term. But in many ways, tracing his trajectory was a way to trace the trajectory of Trump’s post-Presidency Republican Party after Jan. 6. Now, Trump is undoubtedly the dominant leader of the party, and more specifically, Trumpism is the straw that stirs the drink.

Some media say Greene shouldn’t be covered. Some strongly say the opposite. Draper spent time with her.

“That’s the advantage of doing a book as opposed to daily journalism. It took me a year to get my first interview with her. You have to understand, for her, that the mainstream media is, as Trump delicately put it, the enemy of the American people. She thinks we usually lie. We deserve only disgust, the minimum, and contempt, the maximum.

“And so, getting her to cross that psychological Rubicon and be willing to talk to me was a real process. But I find in journalism and anthropology that people generally want to let the rest of the world know why they are the way they are. They want to reveal themselves. And if you put them in a comfortable area, where they feel they can do it, and they trust that they won’t have to pay for it immediately, then they will often start, if only by increments, to turn out. And that’s what happened with Greene and me.

Democracy on the brink

Liz Cheney is in some ways the opposite of Greene. Daughter of Dick Cheney, vice president under George W Bush, she is an establishment figure who only broke with Trump following the attack on the Capitol. Ejected from the party leadership, she is one of two Republicans on the House January 6 Committee, but lost his seat in Wyoming to a Trump-backed challenger.

Liz Cheney is set to leave a hearing on January 6 this month.
Liz Cheney is set to leave a hearing on January 6 this month. Photography: Jabin Botsford / ABACAPRESS.COM/ REX/ Shutterstock

For Draper, it is “remarkable that we are talking about these two women Republicans in the same breath, implicitly recognizing these improbable opposite trajectories.

“In December 2020, if you and I were talking about Liz Cheney and saying, ‘What’s going to happen to her next,’ we wouldn’t be saying she’s going to be kicked out of the party. does it happen to Marjorie Taylor Greene next,” we wouldn’t say she would fundamentally be a more influential figure in the Republican Party than Liz Cheney. That would seem like a far-fetched proposition and yet that’s exactly what happened.

“Cheney was almost alone in thinking that not only did the party need to leave Trump, but it needed to ensure that Trump was no longer a powerful force within the GOP. This put her on an island with Adam Kinzinger and a few precious others. It has paid a heavy political price.

Draper’s previous book, start a war, showed how Cheney’s father and his boss sold the war in Iraq, citing weapons of mass destruction that didn’t exist. What does Cheney think?

“She said, ‘You and I probably disagree on whether or not it was the right thing to do to go to Iraq.’ I remember saying to him, ‘You mean, I’m not a warmonger like you?’ And she laughed, but still sometimes thinks it was a viable proposition. And I think my book comes to the inexorable conclusion that [it] was a very stupid proposition.

“But it’s worth talking about, because … the subject matter was not just Donald Trump, but also the Republican Party and its tenuous grip on the truth. And it was an eye opener, I think, for a lot of us that Liz Cheney… stands for other things beyond ideology, and among them is the preservation of democracy.

Before the Capitol was attacked, Cheney read Lincoln on the edgeTed Widmer’s account of Abraham Lincoln’s perilous train journey to Washington in 1861.

Draper writes, “As the nation teetered on the brink of civil war, Lincoln averted two assassination attempts during the trip, while the counting of electoral college votes at the Capitol was preceded by fear that someone might seizes the mahogany box containing the ballots and thus defeats the presidency of Abe Lincoln before its creation.

“Cheney had shuddered to think of what would have happened if the crowd had gotten their hands on the mahogany boxes on January 6, 2021.”

Widmer is a historian, but many books have suggested that with a deeply polarized America and endemic Trumpism, we could be close to a second Civil War. For Draper, “tragically, it’s not out of the question”.

“It’s certainly clear to me that when you have a third of the voting public in America who believe the election was stolen… [that’s] not something you take with a grain of salt.

“America is really in the throes of fractures that could metastasize into something violent. I hope that’s not the case. But I’m not going to look at you and tell you there’s no no way for that to happen.

]]>
Two Locals Document OC History With New Book ‘Transforming the Irvine Ranch’ https://harpmaker.net/two-locals-document-oc-history-with-new-book-transforming-the-irvine-ranch/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 00:51:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/two-locals-document-oc-history-with-new-book-transforming-the-irvine-ranch/ Both Pike Oliver and Michael Stockstill spent years working at Irvine Co., developing what would become Irvine’s planned community. “It was a phenomenal experience for both of us. We had different goals, but we worked a lot together,” Oliver said. Former colleagues have always talked about writing a book that would chronicle the creation of […]]]>

Both Pike Oliver and Michael Stockstill spent years working at Irvine Co., developing what would become Irvine’s planned community.

“It was a phenomenal experience for both of us. We had different goals, but we worked a lot together,” Oliver said.

Former colleagues have always talked about writing a book that would chronicle the creation of the Irvine community. Then the pandemic stuck them both in their respective homes, with quite a bit of free time. So they began researching and writing their book, “Transforming the Irvine Ranch: Joan Irvine, William Pereira, Ray Watson and the Big Plan.”

“The book is truly a comprehensive history of the Irvine family, the Irvine Co., the UCI, and to some extent Orange County and the City of Irvine, and all the personalities involved. in that period from 1957 to 1977,” Stockstill said. “It’s a story of how the Irvine Ranch grew from an agricultural empire, just a huge farm, into what we consider to be one of the most successful planned communities in the States. -United.”

The book focuses primarily on three individuals: Joan Irvine Smith, William Pereira and Ray Watson.

“Their lives and their interconnectedness really formed the backbone of the book, if you will,” Stockstill said. “It is important to note that Ray Watson, who had been the president of Irvine Co., wrote six chapters of what he hoped would be his book describing his experiences at Irvine Co. from his arrival in 1960 until his departure. in 1977.”

Oliver and Stockstill knew Watson.

“We would hear him say from time to time, ‘Oh, I’m going to put that in the book!’ said Stockstill.

Watson never finished his book, but the six chapters he wrote provided an oral history that Oliver and Stockstill could refer to.

Joan Irvine Smith, the granddaughter of James Irvine II, also wrote a book, “A California Woman’s Story”, which Stockstill calls a complete story from her point of view.

“Transforming the Irvine Ranch”, a new book by Michael Stockstill and Pike Oliver.

(James Carbone)

Pereira was an architect and planner and was commissioned by the University of California to do its master plan for what became UC Irvine. Pereira was on the cover of Time Magazine in 1963; Oliver remembers seeing a copy when he was a high school student in Marin County.

“It became clear to us that there was an enormous amount of information available,” Stockstill said. “Thanks to the internet and some very helpful librarians in a special collection across the United States, we were able to get a huge amount of first hand data that had been left behind in terms of memoirs, oral histories, documents So it kind of built on itself.

The couple set out to record the history of a pivotal time at Irvine Co., both with backgrounds that lent them the task.

Oliver began his career in real estate development strategies and planned communities in the 1970s, including his eight years at Irvine Co.. He resided in Irvine through the 1980s and 1990s. Before moving to Seattle in 2013, Oliver taught real estate development at Cornell University and directed the undergraduate program in urban and regional studies.

Stockstill worked as a reporter and editor in Orange County before joining the Irvine Co. in 1978, where he spent 13 years implementing a major planning strategy. He still lives in Irvine and is a trustee of the Irvine Land Trust.

Recently, the co-authors, who bear an uncanny resemblance, presented their book to the Anaheim Planning Commission at the American Planning Assn. California Chapter Convention at the Anaheim Marriott.

Pike Oliver, right, and Michael Stockstill at the Irvine Ranch Development Information Booth.

Pike Oliver, right, and Michael Stockstill at the Irvine Ranch Development Information Booth during the American Planning Assn. California Chapter Convention at the Marriott Hotel Orange County Ballroom.

(James Carbone)

“The presentation was both a combination of trying to give an overview of what was in the book, but because it was aimed at planners, we emphasized a number of things,” said said Stockstill. “There are three chapters in the book that really detail what the planning philosophy was, how it came about. We talk about Woodbridge as the culmination of everything the Irvine Co. had learned.

Oliver said he was surprised to learn that many conference attendees were unaware of Irvine’s early life.

“We met with planners from Orange County or LA and the Inland Empire, and I asked what they knew about the Irvine Ranch, and they really didn’t know anything about it,” said Oliver.

Since Oliver left Orange County, he always comes back for visits and makes time to catch up with Stockstill. On one such visit, in 2020, before becoming co-authors, Stockstill insisted that they drive to the community they had both helped create. It was during this ride that the two started talking about writing a book together.

“We got together and I said, ‘Hey, let’s go around the ranch. You should see what’s happened since your last visit here,” Stockstill said.

Oliver also remembers driving well.

“Coming back and seeing it decades later, in a bigger picture, I was just amazed at how consistently the plan had been carried out,” Oliver said.

The friends then realized that they had a responsibility to share the story of the birth of the great project. It was an opportunity to write history.

“It’s like doing the second draft of the story,” Oliver said. “The first draft would be notes that people write and like what Ray Watson wrote and the university archives, that would be the first.”

“Transforming the Irvine Ranch: Joan Irvine, William Pereira, Ray Watson and the Big Plan” is available on Amazon.

Support our coverage by becoming a digital subscriber.

]]>
Penn Libraries opens new exhibit showcasing collection of illustrative Japanese books https://harpmaker.net/penn-libraries-opens-new-exhibit-showcasing-collection-of-illustrative-japanese-books/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 04:33:11 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/penn-libraries-opens-new-exhibit-showcasing-collection-of-illustrative-japanese-books/ Penn Museum on October 14, 2022. Credit: Rachel Zhang Penn Libraries has opened a new exhibit showcasing famed photographer Arthur Tress’ collection of Japanese illustrative books and his photographs. The exhibition, which will be on display until December 16, features one of the most comprehensive collections of Japanese illustrated books of any North American institution. […]]]>

Penn Museum on October 14, 2022. Credit: Rachel Zhang

Penn Libraries has opened a new exhibit showcasing famed photographer Arthur Tress’ collection of Japanese illustrative books and his photographs.

The exhibition, which will be on display until December 16, features one of the most comprehensive collections of Japanese illustrated books of any North American institution. According Julie Nelson Davisa professor of modern Asian art who was one of the main co-curators of the exhibition, it is even larger than that of the National Museum of Asian Art.

The books featured in the exhibition vary from well-known titles in Japanese institutions to others that are rare and difficult to find in Japan or the rest of the international community. Along with Davis, the principal co-curators of the exhibition were Linda Luck, associate professor of Japanese studies, and graduate students Eri Mizukane, Nicholas Purgett, and Maria Puzyreva. They were assisted by the curators of the Kislak Center John Pollack and Lynne Farrington.

In 2018, Tress donated his collection of approximately 1,200 Japanese illustration book titles that he started in 1965 to the Kislak Center after reading Davis’ 2014 book “Partners in Print: Artistic Collaboration and the Ukiyo-e Market”.

In the book, Davis discusses the collaborative relationship between illustrator artists and publishers in Edo period Japan. Davis explained that in an email exchange with Tress, he told her that the way she reviewed all parts of the book’s publishing process resonated with him and convinced him that Davis would be a good advocate for his collection.

Following the donation, Davis taught two curatorial seminars at Penn in 2019 and 2020, where she guided her students through the study of various aspects of history, art, print cultures and techniques. creating Japanese books.

Her students participated in a project called “Adopt a Book,” where students chose a Japanese illustrative book from the Tress collection, researched it, and then argued about whether or not to include it in the exposure. In addition, all catalog entries on the books in the exhibition were written by the students.

In class at the end of the semester, the students articulated the themes that were present in the books, which the curatorial team then incorporated into the design of the exhibition – the works in each separate case corresponding to a specific theme. For example, different groups of books were about calligraphy, painting, drama, and other themes.

Mizukane emphasized the harmonious relationship she observes between Tress’s photographs and the books, which she called essentially two exhibits seamlessly put together. She added that the photographs allow viewers to see inside Tress’ head and understand where her work comes from.

“It’s pretty cool because not only can you see the Japanese illustration books, which are really great on their own, but you can also see the influence of the collector and the kind of collector’s world,” a- she declared.

Puzyreva said the Tress collection was one of the driving factors that brought her to Penn to study Japanese art history, as well as the opportunity to work with Davis. Similarly, Purgett said he switched from studying medieval European art to Japanese art for his doctorate, in part because of his enthusiasm for working with the collection.

“If I took that huge leap, I was going to have access to one of the biggest collections, not only in the United States, but, I mean if we’re talking about that, in terms of collection availability, in terms of the breadth of the collection around the world, and that was extremely exciting,” Purgett said.

For Davis, Tress’ photographs are not simply influenced by Japanese books – he forms his own reality and responses to the world around him through his photographs.

“He’s a fun guy. He’s interested in the world; he’s really curious and always experimenting with his own photography. He’s just a joy to work with.

The Tress collection is not the first collection of Japanese books to be donated to Penn Libraries.

In 2013, Shirley and Marilyn Luber, wife and daughter of Gilbert Luber, a Wharton graduate in the late 1940s and renowned Philadelphia art collector, donated a collection of more than 1,300 books dealing with Japanese art and Japan.

“With this collection, the Penn Library becomes one of the premier places for research into Japanese printmaking art from past to present and will enable us to teach this material to a new generation,” Davis told the era. in reference to the Luber collection.

Even after the exhibition ends, students will be able to explore the Tress collection since it will be housed in the Special Collections Center on the sixth floor of the Van Pelt Library.

]]>
American cemeteries reveal surprises, segregation https://harpmaker.net/american-cemeteries-reveal-surprises-segregation/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 02:30:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/american-cemeteries-reveal-surprises-segregation/ By JEFF ROWE The Associated Press It turns out that American cemeteries are much more than custodians of our bodily remains until the organisms in the ground recover everything. Cemeteries tell us about our beliefs, our principles, our economic and cultural values, says Greg Melville in this fascinating examination of how we treat and mistreat […]]]>

By JEFF ROWE The Associated Press

It turns out that American cemeteries are much more than custodians of our bodily remains until the organisms in the ground recover everything. Cemeteries tell us about our beliefs, our principles, our economic and cultural values, says Greg Melville in this fascinating examination of how we treat and mistreat our dead.

Given the subject matter, Melville moves quickly and with a keen sense of connections, trends and the absurd.

He notes, for example, that post-World War II suburban planning was inspired by the simplicity of design that began decades earlier in cemeteries.

Cemeteries can be much more than sets of burial plots. The Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, NY is famous for its sculptures and the art, artifacts and books also housed at the site, which also hosts exhibitions and concerts.

America’s favorite place to scatter creams? It could be Central Park in New York although the high concentration of calcium in the cremains encourages spreading them widely.

People also read…

  • Must-Try Halloween Houses in the Richmond Area: Harry Potter House, Hellraiser House and Giant Skeletons
  • Mi Hacienda closes after 25 years, launches street taco food trucks and catering business
  • Missing former VCU basketball player Rob Brandenberg found safe in North Carolina
  • Carson Wentz trade deal means commanders have to make a big choice in Week 11
  • After praising the work of the police on July 4, the chief of Richmond blocked the senior detective from his prestigious post
  • Former VCU basketball player Rob Brandenberg missing
  • Woman shot dead outside Westover Hills Elementary School
  • High School 🏈 Week 7: Player of the Week Poll, Local Game Stories, Recaps & Schedule, and Statewide Scores
  • Virginia to add electric vehicle charging along interstate highways
  • Records show Youngkin staff unhappy that tourism officials chose governor’s political company for publicity
  • McEachin calls dismantling of Richmond Community Hospital ‘unacceptable’
  • Undefeated JMU makes history and ranks in AP Top 25 for first time ever
  • Short Pump teacher found not guilty in sexual assault case against student
  • Teel: Bacot, Tar Heels headline ACC basketball; Virginia, VT project in upper half
  • Traffic stops in Virginia disproportionately involve black and Hispanic drivers

The descendants of the Seneca Indians who lived in the area where Central Park was built had no chance of scattering the ashes of their loved ones – the park was built on the village cemeteries.

Dying is big business in America; Melville writes that the “death industrial complex” generates $20 billion in annual sales.

The book takes a look over the horizon at what lies ahead in the dying sector, given the number of urban cemeteries that are full or nearly full, and struggling to sustain themselves because they lack new revenue.

The book says that the 144,000 cemeteries in the United States collectively take up more space than the entire state of Delaware.

New cemeteries in Philadelphia and Marin County, California, wrap bodies in cloth and bury them without preserving chemicals, metal coffins or concrete burial vaults.

The most powerful sections of the book are those that explain how far white people often went to ensure that no black people were buried nearby. Early Chinese immigrants were also shunned to their deaths despite their role in building the transcontinental railroad and western cities. Indian graves were looted and structures were built over Indian cemeteries.

Even in death, blacks could not escape segregation. Melville’s book documents how in many states cemeteries were and remain separate.

In 2021, he writes, the family of a black Louisiana sheriff’s deputy were barred from burying him in a local cemetery because they “enforced an illegal whites-only policy.”

As Melville explains, black cemeteries generally remain visibly inferior to those established by and for whites. Yet spending an eternity in a neglected cemetery apparently remains better than the fate of America’s 6 million slaves from the arrival of the first ships carrying human cargo until emancipation. Melville says we only know where “a fraction” of the 6 million are buried.

While the federal government funds the upkeep of Confederate soldiers’ gravesites, it allocates no funds for the “restoration of preserved historically black cemeteries.” The Maryland legislature has discussed funding for historically black cemeteries but has yet to take action.

Melville has researched, reported, and written a powerful book that not only calls on us to treat all Americans fairly in death but also in life. It is up to us to remedy the injustices of the past in American cemeteries because, as Melville reminds us, “the dead have no voice”.

]]>