American book – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 02:03:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://harpmaker.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png American book – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ 32 32 Reviews | Is Biden showing undertones of Trump? https://harpmaker.net/reviews-is-biden-showing-undertones-of-trump/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 23:00:04 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/reviews-is-biden-showing-undertones-of-trump/ “It was the longest day of the year and the Irish Sea had a metallic tint. The waves were tiny but insistent, like uncooperative children. It’s a passage from DT Max recent profile of the writer Colm Toibin in The New Yorker. (Thanks to Irma Wolfson of Irvine, Calif., For her nomination.) Toibin’s new novel, […]]]>

“It was the longest day of the year and the Irish Sea had a metallic tint. The waves were tiny but insistent, like uncooperative children. It’s a passage from DT Max recent profile of the writer Colm Toibin in The New Yorker. (Thanks to Irma Wolfson of Irvine, Calif., For her nomination.)

Toibin’s new novel, “The Magician,” about writer Thomas Mann, was recently commented on in The Times by Jay Parini, who had this to say about the book’s protagonist: “What he dreamed of, most of the time , they were beautiful young men. To say that Mann was locked up is an understatement. His homoeroticism had many abodes, and he roamed their halls in his dreams with impunity. (Nancy Trout, West Hartford, Connecticut)

This is Jason Gay, in The Wall Street Journal, about Russian tennis champion Daniil Medvedev: “A collection of wonderfully unorthodox 6-foot-6 arms, legs and kicks, Medvedev swinging over the end line can look like someone at a picnic that chases away flies. (Jane Jones, Winchester, Massachusetts)

In the Boston Globe, Scot Lehigh recorded on the efforts of Mike Lindell, the founder of My Pillow and Donald Trump’s comforter, to sell Trump’s corrupt electoral lie and noted that Lindell “has been laughed at by hosting a three-day symposium that even his own pundits have conceded did not establish exactly anything. Nothing, that is, beyond this axiom: you can take an impressionable foam pillow under a nutty noggin, but you cannot remove the fluffy foam from inside a pitchman’s mad skull. pixelated. (Len Coppola, Gilford, New Hampshire)

George Will, in the Washington Post, is a reliable vein of glittering prose, such as that: “New technologies – cable TV, the Internet, social media – produce a blitzkrieg of words, written and spoken. The words spoken are often shouted by overheated individuals who obviously believe that the lungs are the seat of wisdom. (Stella Deacon, Toronto)

In The Times, Binyamin Applebaum summed up a certain subset of capitalists thus: “At the moment, the people who use Bitcoin are basically a bunch of cosplay libertarians participating in a make-believe game on the playgrounds of the world. State nanny. (Bruce Falstein, Santa Barbara, Calif., Among others.)

Bret Stephens wrote: “It is no accident that Trump’s favorite medium was Twitter: the medium is perfect for people who think with spasms, speak with growls, speak with insults and greet with spasms. hashtags. (Susan Preston, Chapel Hill, NC, and Vicki Shaw, Spring Grove, PA, among others.)


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Reinventing American exceptionalism could help rediscover our common values: Richard M. Perloff and Anup Kumar https://harpmaker.net/reinventing-american-exceptionalism-could-help-rediscover-our-common-values-richard-m-perloff-and-anup-kumar/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 09:25:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/reinventing-american-exceptionalism-could-help-rediscover-our-common-values-richard-m-perloff-and-anup-kumar/ CLEVELAND – Sometimes, after a period of cataclysmic national events, it helps to take stock. Last August, the nation experienced the chaotic evacuation of Afghanistan, the loss of 13 valiant American lives, and the painful reminder that we had been defeated in a valiant 20-year effort. A few weeks later came the 20th anniversary of […]]]>

CLEVELAND – Sometimes, after a period of cataclysmic national events, it helps to take stock.

Last August, the nation experienced the chaotic evacuation of Afghanistan, the loss of 13 valiant American lives, and the painful reminder that we had been defeated in a valiant 20-year effort.

A few weeks later came the 20th anniversary of September 11: the striking images, the memorable interpretations of heroism and transcendent patriotism, but also the regrets and recriminations over the two seemingly everlasting wars in Iraq and Afghanistan that followed. in its wake and which have cost so much lives, and, as commentators told us relentlessly, seemed not to be worth the price of American blood and sacrifice.

All of this produced a sense of cognitive dissonance between the pride and optimism we have been taught to associate with America and the sad, ambiguous and cruel reality, with the resulting feelings of helplessness and pain that result. .

For us, the dissonance goes back even further, to the central contradiction Gunnar Myrdal identified between the American creed’s emphasis on equal opportunity and the many (continuing) examples of racial and social injustice that belies the egalitarianism dear to the creed.

The American credo is like the pole star that should move the nation’s ship through rough waters. Unfortunately, the ship swerves and keels, threatening to capsize in the ruthless political sea. All of this creates a cognitive dissonance between what is and what should be.

Richard M. Perloff is a professor at Cleveland State University.

When people are faced with dissonant situations that make them uncomfortable, psychologists tell us that we can’t always rationalize them. Instead, psychologists like Claude M. Steele argued, we can feel better about the disjunction between actions that undermine ideals and brilliant ideals by finding ways to assert our beliefs in those deeper values ​​- by finding examples of how the American democratic project that has been tarnished in recent years continues to inspire.

As a growing number of Americans, we find it difficult to sustain a belief in American exceptionalism. But we believe that the United States is a country that has given exceptional ideas and ideals to human civilization, revolving around a democratic government with free speech, freedom of the press and a system of brakes and counterweight.

In hopes of restoring faith in the American experience, we turned to a recent book, by David M. Rubinstein, “The American Experiment: Dialogues on a Dream,” which featured interviews that leave a feeling of dullness. renewed inspiration for the democratic experience.

One begins with Rubinstein’s recitation of America’s “13 key genes”, the idealized DNA that spawned the American political project, spanning democracy, equality and entrepreneurship.

We continue with Rubinstein’s interviews with historians Jill Lepore and Danielle S. Allen, who tout the Declaration of Independence as a flawed but distinctive document that guaranteed human rights, inspired the world, spawned hundreds of other national declarations and whose egalitarianism contributed to the birth of political movements later: civil rights, women’s suffrage and LGBTQ rights.

Anup kumar

Anup Kumar is a professor at Cleveland State University.

But there is more, as the book shifts to other aspects of American cultural genealogy: the country’s taste for innovation, seen in the invention of “transmitters, microprocessors, search engines and artificial intelligence.” ; and his uniquely American triumphs, spanning the Wright brothers of Ohio, American moonshot, and jazz, “America’s national art.”

Appealing to these uniquely American values ​​remains a challenge in a society so fragmented, polarized, and torn by groups that have provoked political violence. Divisions accentuated by the fragmentation of social media make it difficult to see how the nation’s ideals and legendary heroes can transcend bitter political differences. If nations are imagined communities, like the political theorist Benoit Anderson noted, then America must find ways, from improving civic education to institutionalizing National service, to accede to its founding ideals, to reinvent the most exceptional values ​​of the nation, and as the poet Jericho Brown wrote, “Rethinking / What it is to be a nation”.

Richard M. Perloff and Anup Kumar are professors of communication at Cleveland State University.

Do you have something to say on this subject?

* Send a letter to the editor, which will be considered for the print publication.

* Email general questions about our Editorial Board or comments or corrections on this Opinion Column to Elizabeth Sullivan, Opinion Director, at esullivan@cleveland.com.


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Feeding Minds Press Releases Children’s Book ‘Grange at Night’ https://harpmaker.net/feeding-minds-press-releases-childrens-book-grange-at-night/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 13:49:11 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/feeding-minds-press-releases-childrens-book-grange-at-night/ A new children’s book is now available for families looking for a compelling farming story to share. Barn at night, featuring lyrical poetry and vibrant watercolors, is now available from Feeding Minds Press, the publishing company of the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture. “In Barn at night, readers discover the sure magic of a […]]]>

A new children’s book is now available for families looking for a compelling farming story to share. Barn at night, featuring lyrical poetry and vibrant watercolors, is now available from Feeding Minds Press, the publishing company of the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture.

“In Barn at night, readers discover the sure magic of a pre-dawn farm, ”said Daniel Meloy, Executive Director of the Foundation for Agriculture. “We hope this book exemplifies the dedication of farmers and ranchers to caring for their animals, day in and day out, long before the rest of the world comes to life.”

This heartwarming yet realistic tale, written by Michelle Houts and illustrated by Jen Betton, invites readers as a father and daughter step out to the barn on a cold winter night and are greeted by an enchanting scene. The couple find out who is awake, who is sleeping and who has just made their first appearance in the barn.

“One of the best and most organic ways to help students learn is simply through stories. And so, books are a great vehicle for that kind of information, especially with lots of pictures to help tell the story. Children are so visual. Books like Barn at night really help young learners understand where their food comes from, who grows it and how they grow it, ”said Julia Recko, director of the Foundation’s Education Outreach program.

To complement the book, Feeding Minds Press has created several interesting complementary resources, including a activity kit, a in-depth video of the book illustrator showing her creative process and a blog post from the author of the book explaining his inspiration for the book. Full educator’s guide is available or a sample lesson plan can be viewed here.

Barn at night is the fourth print title of Feeding Minds Press, which published Just this very minute in January 2019, Chuck’s Ice Cream Wish in March 2020, and My family’s soybean farm in January 2021.

Feeding Minds Press also offers several free printable books that focus on careers in agriculture. The book is available for purchase directly from Feeding Minds Press, as well as on Amazon and Barnes & Noble in line.


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Trump, Republicans and White Evangelicals form a powerful trio https://harpmaker.net/trump-republicans-and-white-evangelicals-form-a-powerful-trio/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 20:54:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/trump-republicans-and-white-evangelicals-form-a-powerful-trio/ According to new analysis from the Pew Research Center, “evangelical” no longer means born again; it means republican. Of course, evangelicals have kissed the Republican Party since the late 1970s, but, according to the analysis, more white Americans adopted the evangelical etiquette between 2016 and 2020, years which include the presidential campaigns of former President […]]]>

According to new analysis from the Pew Research Center, “evangelical” no longer means born again; it means republican. Of course, evangelicals have kissed the Republican Party since the late 1970s, but, according to the analysis, more white Americans adopted the evangelical etiquette between 2016 and 2020, years which include the presidential campaigns of former President Donald Trump and his stay in the White House.

Basically, evangelical is more a political label than a religious one.

When it comes to this, evangelical is more a political label than a religious one. People who adhere to the label use it to signal that they are against immigration, science and abortion and to signal the belief that discussions of racism in America are against their idea of ​​America. .

The Pew survey shows that Trump garnered even more support from evangelicals in 2020 than he did in 2016. Between 2016 and 2020, 16% of people who did not identify as evangelicals in 2016 identified themselves as evangelicals in 2016. identified that way by 2020. Interestingly, that 16% did not vote for Trump in 2016. In 2020, of the 78% of white evangelical voters who voted for Trump, 18% of them were Trump converts – evangelicals who did not support him in 2016.

The Pew Survey is not the only evidence indicating this hardening of American evangelism. A PRRI survey notes that while the majority of Americans blame the insurgency on white supremacist groups, Trump and conservative media platforms, conservatives and evangelicals do not believe they are the culprits. On the contrary, 57% of white evangelical Protestants believe that liberal left-wing groups such as antifa are responsible for the January 6 riots, and 68% of white evangelicals polled believe Trump is a “true patriot.”

All this shows that evangelism is not an exclusively religious group, but a predominantly white religious group strongly linked to Asset, the Republican Party and specific ideas on race, kind, morality and America.

In my delivered “White Evangelical Racism, the Politics of Morality in America,” I argue that evangelicalism is not only about cultural whiteness, but also political whiteness. White evangelicals support candidates who espouse both political and moral views that merge with their own. Recent books by Robert p jones, Kristin Kobes Du Mez, and Andrew Whitehead and Samuel L. Perry also note the roles of whiteness in religion, masculinity and nationalism for evangelicals.

While this may surprise evangelicals (including Baptist theologian Russell Moore) who have been defend their religious movement against Trumpism, the point is that Trumpism and Evangelicalism are complementary to each other.

Evangelicals are engaged in a political renewal.

There are many reasons that could be attributed to the fact that more people are calling themselves evangelical, but it is certainly not because of a great religious revival. Evangelicals are engaged in a political revival, steeped in racism, anti-immigrant sentiments, sexual morality and misplaced nostalgia.

Consider the things in 2021 that contributed to this politicization: January 6 insurrection, the Abortion in Texas, anti-vaccines movement, the anti-criticism of racial theory, and anti-immigration sentiment around Afghan nationals and other groups. Any of these would have pushed evangelicals into political action, but now it’s a virtual feeding frenzy for enthusiastic politicians and evangelical leaders hoping for money, power and a status by embracing those feelings and fears among their supporters.

These polls tell us the trajectory that Republican politicians will use to fuel their evangelical base in the 2022 and 2024 election cycles. Now those who do not know the theological beliefs of evangelism identify as such, there should be no confusion about what evangelism really is in America: a full-fledged religious political movement whose allegiance is to Republican Party issues and whiteness.


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6 new books on the pandemic, #MeToo and other hot topics https://harpmaker.net/6-new-books-on-the-pandemic-metoo-and-other-hot-topics/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 08:44:53 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/6-new-books-on-the-pandemic-metoo-and-other-hot-topics/ Why were our cities and their economies so vulnerable to the coronavirus pandemic? Two Harvard economists take stock of the issues plaguing American cities (or, as they put it, the “demons” that often “accompany density”), including healthcare, affordable housing, education, class disparities and more. The authors approach the issues from different political angles and imagine […]]]>

Why were our cities and their economies so vulnerable to the coronavirus pandemic? Two Harvard economists take stock of the issues plaguing American cities (or, as they put it, the “demons” that often “accompany density”), including healthcare, affordable housing, education, class disparities and more. The authors approach the issues from different political angles and imagine what cities might look like in the future.

Penguin Press, September 7 | Read our review

Even before the extent of the pandemic’s destruction became clear, “there was every reason to believe that 2020 could be tumultuous,” Tooze writes. He tends to take into account the big defining events of his time – the 2008 financial crash, world affairs after WWI – and here investigates the economic response to the pandemic. As our reviewer put it, “The great service of this book is that it challenges us to consider how our institutions and systems, and the assumptions, positions and divisions that underpin them, leave us ill-prepared for the next crisis. “

Viking, September 7 | Read our review



Long before #MeToo became a global movement, Burke mobilized women around these two words. Her memoir opens in 2017, with the realization that the hashtag has taken off on Facebook, pushed by strangers with a different set of goals than she has worked for years. “It can’t happen,” she told a friend. “You all know that if these white women start using this hashtag, and it becomes popular, they’ll never believe that a black woman in her 40s from the Bronx built a movement for it. same purposes, using those exact words, for years now. To read “Unbound” is to believe it and understand how Burke used empathy and transparency to pave the way for change.

Iron, September 14 | Read our interview with Burke

In two previous books, “Fear” and “Rage,” Woodward probed the turmoil of the Trump presidency. Now he and Costa are focused on the transition from Trump’s White House to the Biden administration. They interviewed hundreds of people for this account, which covers the November election, the January 6 Capitol uprising, and the challenges Biden faced in the first months of his presidency.

Simon & Schuster, September 21 | Read our review

Abedin, a longtime political insider, has often been overshadowed by her connections with two politicians: Hillary Clinton, for whom she worked as a high-level assistant, and former Rep. Anthony Weiner, her ex-husband. “This journey has taken me through some exhilarating milestones and devastating setbacks. I walked both with great pride and in crushing shame ”, Abedin said. Hers is a life for which she is “extremely grateful and a story I look forward to sharing.”

Scribner, November 2

This book is based on the Pulitzer Prize winning project published in the New York Times Magazine, which seeks to place the “consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of our national narrative,” and includes new essays, poems and works of fiction.

One World, November 16


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Reviews | Religious beliefs and abortion laws https://harpmaker.net/reviews-religious-beliefs-and-abortion-laws/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 15:00:08 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/reviews-religious-beliefs-and-abortion-laws/ The Bible teaches us that in an ideal world, “mercy and truth meet, justice and peace are embraced.” Instead, Texas has become the barometer of a world where justice spits on mercy. We can and must do better. Rosemary C. McDonoughNarberth, Pennsylvania. For the publisher: Re “God has no place at the Supreme Court”, by […]]]>

The Bible teaches us that in an ideal world, “mercy and truth meet, justice and peace are embraced.” Instead, Texas has become the barometer of a world where justice spits on mercy. We can and must do better.

Rosemary C. McDonough
Narberth, Pennsylvania.

For the publisher:

Re “God has no place at the Supreme Court”, by Linda Greenhouse (Sunday Review, September 12):

As a minister for 35 years, I am distressed by the continued reference to “God” in letters, opinion pieces, and nonsensical articles to which God refers. Ms. Greenhouse is one of the best commentators, and she’s right that God does not belong to the Supreme Court, that’s for sure, but what God is she referring to, or is the Supreme Court referring to?

Is this the God of the Hebrew Bible or the New Testament? Allah or Gaia, Thor or Kali, Elihino of the Cherokee tradition, the Buddha or Shiva? There are thousands of Gods. Is this the God of Paul Tillich, Dietrich Bonhoeffer or Jerry Falwell? It would be so helpful to identify which God is cited, because there is certainly more than one.

Jim nelson
Pasadena, California

For the publisher:

Having argued constitutional law issues and as a former member of the board of directors of New Jersey Right to Choose, I must (alas) challenge “God has no place on the Supreme Court”.

The reality is that since our founding, “God” has always held a place in the public arena (often against my agnostic preferences). The famous Declaration of Independence declares that it is not the “government”, but our “Creator” who endowed us with “certain inalienable rights”.

Indeed, the courtroom of the Supreme Court is adorned with religious images such as Moses holding the Ten Commandments. So while I sympathize very much with the philosophy of Linda Greenhouse, I cannot ignore the facts that work against it.

Two-thirds of Americans want abortion to remain safe and legal, if not entirely at least to some extent. Thus, the pro-choice movement would do well to focus its energies on securing abortion rights through the legislative process. Although there may unfortunately be aberrant states such as Texas and Mississippi, if two-thirds of Americans want to preserve some degree of abortion rights, they should persuade their elected lawmakers to do just that, and not to not rely on the whims of unelected judges.


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How hope, fear and misinformation drove thousands of Haitians to the US border https://harpmaker.net/how-hope-fear-and-misinformation-drove-thousands-of-haitians-to-the-us-border/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 00:14:18 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/how-hope-fear-and-misinformation-drove-thousands-of-haitians-to-the-us-border/ The United States is home to around one million Haitians, with the largest numbers concentrated in Miami, Boston and New York. But Haitian communities have flourished in Maryland, Ohio, North Carolina and California. This week, the United States resumed deportation flights to Haiti under Title 42, an emergency public health order that empowered the government […]]]>

The United States is home to around one million Haitians, with the largest numbers concentrated in Miami, Boston and New York. But Haitian communities have flourished in Maryland, Ohio, North Carolina and California.

This week, the United States resumed deportation flights to Haiti under Title 42, an emergency public health order that empowered the government to seal the border and turn back migrants during the pandemic. Immigration and Customs Enforcement repatriated around 90 Haitians, including families, on Wednesday.

The move drew strong reprimands from immigrant advocates and lawmakers who said the administration should offer Haitians legal protection and the ability to seek asylum rather than repatriating them to their home countries. struggling just a month after the earthquake.

“It is cruel and wrong to send someone back to Haiti now,” said Steve Forester, immigration policy coordinator at the Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti.

But the return of Haitians to their country of origin is “essential to prevent this kind of situation from developing,” said Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, which promotes immigration control. “If a Haitian who arrives at the US border is free of domicile, then more people will. If you have lived in Brazil or Chile for years, one of your children was born here, you are not entitled to asylum. You have been firmly resettled in another country.

At the spillway north of the Del Rio International Bridge, a two-lane artery that connects the small, bicultural town to Mexico, on Friday, migrants from the growing crowd became restless while waiting to be processed by border officials. They wandered around the camp, which was filling with hundreds of new arrivals on Friday, and crossed the Rio Grande to Ciudad Acuña, where they bought as much hot food and cold drinks as they could carry.

Near the bridge, enterprising migrants have settled in, shouting their goods and prices. It was like an open-air market, and by mid-afternoon the piles of garbage were strewn across the dirt floor. As the sun intensified, so did the dust, which left a thin layer on clothes, cellphones and bodies.


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“Forgotten First:” A Look at Four – and More – NFL Pioneers | Richmond Free Press https://harpmaker.net/forgotten-first-a-look-at-four-and-more-nfl-pioneers-richmond-free-press/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/forgotten-first-a-look-at-four-and-more-nfl-pioneers-richmond-free-press/ In this age of racial reckoning, it is not only fitting but meaningful that the stories of the NFL pioneers be told. Keyshawn Johnson, the first pick in the 1996 New York Jets draft and now host of ESPN’s morning show “Keyshawn, JWill and Max”, did it. Collaborating with Bob Glauber, Newsday columnist and 2021 […]]]>

In this age of racial reckoning, it is not only fitting but meaningful that the stories of the NFL pioneers be told.

Keyshawn Johnson, the first pick in the 1996 New York Jets draft and now host of ESPN’s morning show “Keyshawn, JWill and Max”, did it.

Collaborating with Bob Glauber, Newsday columnist and 2021 recipient of the Bill Nunn Jr. Award from the Pro Football Writers of America for outstanding long-standing reporting, Johnson is the author of “Forgotten First.” The book is illuminating and often angering documentation on an ugly period in professional football history.

And it’s a tribute to four men who crossed the color barrier in a sport in which 70% of players are now African-American: Kenny Washington, Woody Strode, Marion Motley and Bill Willis.

“It’s near my home. It is an educational vehicle for those with a lack of education on how minorities were reintegrated into the National Football League a long time ago, ”Johnson said.

Johnson and Glauber pay tribute to others who have helped bring the game into the game, especially Paul Brown, arguably football’s greatest coach and innovator. Brown never saw the color, and in 1946 he recruited Motley and Willis for his Cleveland team at the All-America Football Conference even as Washington and Strode were on the verge of making an NFL breakthrough.

“He never saw himself as doing anything other than recruiting the best players,” Bengals owner Mike Brown, son of Paul Brown, said in the book. “He didn’t see himself as someone who deserved credit as a civil rights leader. He did it just because he thought he was doing the right thing.

The authors also make compelling observations on those who blocked integration, including former Washington franchise owner George Preston Marshall, the leader of the anti-minority movement within the league that other owners have silently backed. A monument outside Washington’s RFK Stadium in honor of Marshall was demolished last year.

“George Preston Marshall was a shameless segregationist who had a huge impact on the NFL in terms of keeping African American players out of the league,” Glauber said. “Back when he owned the team, Washington was the southernmost franchise in the country, and Marshall was adamant that he didn’t have black players because he believed they would alienate his fan base. .

“The other owners just didn’t push back, and after the 1933 season there weren’t any black players in the league. Looking back, Art Rooney Sr. called it the biggest mistake of his life as an owner.

Even after reinstatement began in 1946, Mar-hall refused to recruit African-American players. It was only after pressure from the upper echelons of President John F. Kennedy’s administration in 1961 that he finally gave in.

One of the best chapters of the book, published by Grand Central Publishing and available September 21, deals with the relationship between Jackie Robinson, famous black first Major League Baseball player in 1947, and his UCLA teammates Washington and Strode. . At one point, the trio were nicknamed “Three Dark Horsemen” in a play “Four Horsemen” by Notre Dame. They were so good.

For all of their successes, especially by Washington, the first Bruin to lead the nation in all-out offense and an All-American, the NFL wasn’t about to sign an African-American in 1939. Not even the best player in the game. the country.

There would, of course, be professional level success for Washington and Strode, but not like Motley and Willis, who were inducted into the Professional Football Hall of Fame after their exemplary careers. Strode became better known as an actor. Washington, plagued by knee problems, was the forerunner of backs like Bo Jackson and Gale Sayers, who were also otherworldly athletes with careers cut short due to injuries.

But Jackson and Sayers faced nothing like the racism that “Forgotten First” men did. Thanks to Johnson and Glauber, their stories – and hopefully some lessons learned – will be recorded with readers.

“We didn’t write this book because of the racial calculation of the country over the past two years,” says Glauber. “We wrote it because these four pioneers have really been forgotten by history, and people must know the names Washington, Strode, Willis and Motley as much as they know Jackie Robinson.”


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Newsom’s anti-Trump recall strategy offers warning for mid-term 2022 https://harpmaker.net/newsoms-anti-trump-recall-strategy-offers-warning-for-mid-term-2022/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 17:28:08 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/newsoms-anti-trump-recall-strategy-offers-warning-for-mid-term-2022/ SAN LEANDRO, Calif .– California is bathed in its foresight. “The future comes here first,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said, calling his state “America’s coming attraction.” However, in categorically rejecting efforts to recall him from office, Mr Newsom made it clear that California’s cherished role foreshadowing tomorrow’s politics was not as important as another bigger factor […]]]>

SAN LEANDRO, Calif .– California is bathed in its foresight. “The future comes here first,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said, calling his state “America’s coming attraction.”

However, in categorically rejecting efforts to recall him from office, Mr Newsom made it clear that California’s cherished role foreshadowing tomorrow’s politics was not as important as another bigger factor in Tuesday’s results. : today’s tribal politics.

The first-term Democratic governor will remain in office because, in a deeply liberal state, he effectively nationalized the recall effort as a Republican plot, making a flamethrower radio host the face of opposition to Trump to polarize the electorate on red. and blue lines.

Mr Newsom has been successful not because of what makes California different, but because of how it’s like everywhere else: he dominated the heavily populated Democratic towns of California, the key to victory in a state where his party is five million more voters than Republicans.

“Gavin might have been on a high wire, but he was wearing a big blue safety harness,” said Mike Murphy, a Republican quarterback based in California.

The recall offers Democrats in Washington at least one lesson ahead of next year’s midterm elections: The party’s pre-existing blue-and-purple-states strategy of portraying Republicans as Trump-loving extremists may still prove to be effective with the former president removed from office. , at least when the strategy is executed with relentless discipline, an avalanche of money and an opponent who plays typing.

“Either you keep Gavin Newsom as governor or you will have Donald Trump,” President Biden said at a rally on the eve of the election in Long Beach, making it clear what Mr. Newsom and his allies have been suggesting for weeks at a time. About the republican front. runner, longtime radio host Larry Elder.

By the time Mr. Biden arrived in California, Mr. Newsom was in a good position. Yet in the days leading up to the recall, he warned Democrats of the right-wing threat they would face in elections across the country next November.

“Get involved, wake up, this thing is happening,” he said in an interview, calling Mr. Elder a “national spokesperson for an extreme agenda.”

California, which has not elected a Republican governor since the administration of George W. Bush, is hardly a point of contention for next year’s midterms. Yet for Republicans considering lower approval ratings for Mr. Biden and growing more hopeful about their prospects for 2022, the recall failure is less of a worrying omen than a cautious recall. on what happens when they present candidates who are easy prey for the opposition.

The last time Democrats controlled the presidency and both houses of Congress, in 2010, Republicans made big gains but failed to reclaim the Senate because they nominated a handful of candidates so flawed they ‘they managed to lose in one of the best midterm elections for the GOP in modern history.

That is, the primaries are important – and if Republicans want the Senate back next year, party officials say, they will do so by elevating candidates who don’t come with the research records of the bulging opposition from a 27-year veteran of right-wing radio..

“Larry Elder saved their lives,” Rob Stutzman, a Republican strategist in Sacramento, said of Democrats. “Until this race had a general electoral context, there wasn’t much enthusiasm for life in California. But when you have the almost perfect caricature of a MAGA candidate, well, you can kick your constituents out. “

Former Governor Gray Davis, the Democrat who was recalled in 2003, put it more concisely: “It was a gift from God,” he said of Mr Elder. “He ran his entire campaign as if the electorate were conservative Republicans.”

Eager for good news after a gloomy month, Democrats will nonetheless be able to profit with joy from Mr Newsom’s triumph. After all, Mr. Biden himself knows only too well, from his experience as vice president in 2010, when his party lost the Massachusetts Senate seat vacated by the death of Senator Edward M. Kennedy, that even the safest races cannot be taken for granted in special elections.

In addition, Mr. Newsom’s success politically justifies the president’s decision to issue a mandate on companies to demand the Covid-19 vaccine. The governor has campaigned aggressively on his own vaccine demands and lambasted Mr. Elder for vowing to cancel them.

In fact, before Mr Biden announced the policy on Thursday, Mr Newsom’s lieutenants believed they were leading the way for other Democrats, including the president. “We are doing what the White House needs to do, which is to become more campaigning on vaccines,” Sean Clegg, one of the governor’s top advisers, said last week.

Historically, much of California’s political leanings have been on the right.

From the first election of Ronald Reagan as governor, marking the backlash of the 1960s, to the property tax revolt of the 1970s, foreshadowing Reagan’s national success in the 1980s, the state was somewhat of a box office. Conservative Petri.

Even in recent years, as California turned to the left, it was possible to discern the Republican future in Governor Pete Wilson’s hard line on illegal immigration in the 1990s and in the potent cocktail of celebrity, de populism and platitudes of Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 2000s.

Earlier this summer, it emerged that once again California may herald national trends. Burdened by rising crime, homelessness and Covid fatigue, Mr Newsom has been seen in polls as in danger of being recalled.

His challenge, however, was not a tidal wave of opposition, but democratic apathy.

That started to change when Mr Newsom spent his opponents and Republican supporters on the four-to-one recall on television over the summer. Voter sentiment shifted even more sharply from replacing him once Mr. Elder emerged, turning the contest from a referendum on Mr. Newsom into a more traditional Republican versus Democrat election.

Every Democratic campaign billboard and leaflet, and even the voter guide that was sent to registered California voters, called the vote a “Republican recall,” sporting a scarlet R on the exercise.

A rare convergence of interests between Democrats and Republicans ultimately favored Mr. Newsom: The only people more enthusiastic about raising the profile of Mr. Elder, a black conservative who likes to pierce liberal piety, were the members. paid governor’s staff.

As the media attention has helped Mr Elder became the most popular alternative, it helped Mr Newsom in ensuring that the contest would look more like a general election than the last, and to this day only, a successful governorship callback from California.

In 2003, Mr. Schwarzenegger was better known for his Hollywood credits than for his politics. He also hammered home a distinctly local issue, the California auto tax, which has kept the race focused on state rather than federal policies. And the incumbent, Mr Davis, was far more unpopular than Mr Newsom is.

California was then also a less polarized state. In 2000, Mr. Bush lost California by about 11 percentage points, while retaining Republican redoubts like Orange and San Diego counties. Last year, Mr. Trump was routed in the state by nearly 30 points and decisively lost the same two counties.

Rather than defending his record, Mr Newsom turned his stemmed speech into a chapter-and-verse recitation of Mr Elder’s comments denigrating women, downplaying climate change and questioning the need for a minimum wage.

He also invoked the specter of the Red States and their rulers, despising Republicans ‘handling of Covid, voting restrictions and, in the final days of the campaign, Texas’ restrictive new abortion law.

As minority parliamentary leader Kevin McCarthy, California’s most prominent Republican, kept his distance from the recall, Mr. Newsom was regularly joined by Democratic members of Congress, who linked the recall to Mr. Trump’s refusal of admit defeat and to January 6. storming the Capitol.

“Another kind of insurgency in California,” as Rep. Karen Bass said at a rally in Los Angeles.

Mr. Elder, for his part, readily portrayed himself as the provocateur he is, crushing more moderate GOP hopes like former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer. He vowed to end vaccination mandates for state employees, which applauded conservative crowds but alienated the pro-vaccine majority.

Mr Newsom’s polls showed him to lead 69-28 among Californians who said they had been vaccinated, his advisers said, a significant advantage in a state where nearly seven in ten adults have been vaccinated.

The possibility that Elder-style figures could win primaries in more competitive states alarms many establishment-aligned Republicans as they assess the 2022 landscape.

Candidates too closely tied to Mr. Trump, or loaded with personal baggage, or both, could undermine the party’s prospects in states like Georgia, Arizona, Missouri and Pennsylvania, which will prove key to determining control of the Senate.

Likewise, Republicans could struggle in the battlefield governor’s races in Ohio, Georgia and Arizona if far-right candidates win in the primaries thanks to Mr. Trump’s blessing.

In a few states, however, the Trump-era party brand is as toxic as in California.

“It’s not about Schwarzenegger, it’s not even Scott Walker,” Newsom said, referring to the former Republican governor of Wisconsin who pushed back a recall. “It’s about arming this office for an extreme national agenda.”

It is, said the governor, “Trump’s party, even here in California.”


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Ask the author: Meredith Stabel https://harpmaker.net/ask-the-author-meredith-stabel/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 02:49:33 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/ask-the-author-meredith-stabel/ Meredith Stabel, PhD candidate in English and editor-in-chief of the UI Press, answers questions about her first published book, Radicals: Audacious Writings by American Women, an anthology of long-lost writings by women of the 19th century. Ayrton Breckenridge University of Iowa Press and Ph.D. Acquisitions Editor University of Iowa Department of English candidate Meredith Stabel […]]]>

Meredith Stabel, PhD candidate in English and editor-in-chief of the UI Press, answers questions about her first published book, Radicals: Audacious Writings by American Women, an anthology of long-lost writings by women of the 19th century.

Ayrton Breckenridge

University of Iowa Press and Ph.D. Acquisitions Editor University of Iowa Department of English candidate Meredith Stabel poses for a portrait at Kuhl House on Friday, September 10, 2021.

UI English PhD student and UI Press editor-in-chief Meredith Stabel has published her first book, Radicals: Bold Writings of American Women, alongside co-editor Zachary Turpin, June 15, 2021. The book composes the long-lost writings of several 19th-century authors, both well-known and unknown, and has been hailed for its inclusiveness of genres and voices. Stabel sat down with The Iowan Daily to discuss his book and his creative inspirations.

DI: It is evident that you and your co-editor have chosen to include a very diverse range of authors in the two Radicals: Volume One and Radicals: Volume 2. Is there a unifying theme among their stories?

Stabel: I think radicals are the unifying theme and that’s why we chose this title. So these were women who weren’t even supposed to write necessarily. They weren’t supposed to preach in the pulpit, they weren’t supposed to publish articles in the newspapers – they weren’t supposed to publicize their ideas. So we kind of wanted to extend the biggest hits that people read in high school and college, right – so like most people read Awakening, and Yellow wallpaper – so, we love them and they are amazing, but find other things from Chopin and Gilman, and then also bring other people into the fold, who are not often canonized.

Q. I saw that Roxane Gay, in the front that she made for Radicals, said that you and Zachary “challenge the power structures that unduly influence the trajectories of our lives and challenge the people who benefit from them”. Why was this important to you guys?

Stabel: Well, first of all, it was really surreal that we could even email Roxane Gay, let alone make her read our stuff and say what she was thinking. So it was definitely a ‘pinch me’ moment, and I admire it so much. And, yes, one of the things that I think Zach and I felt was to include a diverse group of women who weren’t even supposed to have access to reading or writing most of the time in the 19th century. century, but somehow did it anyway. And it’s actually a little unfathomable how awesome it is. And then, you know, the other kind of problem is “the gun”, right? Everyone always denies the canon, but it’s true, as we read mostly white women: Emily Dickinson, Gilman, Chopin. And maybe if you’re lucky you’ll read Toni Morrison’s and maybe Harriet Jacobs’ Slave Tale, but it’s really limited, especially from the 19th century onwards. Because it was a time when African American, Asian, and Native American women weren’t published. So Zach and I are two white people who have this opportunity, and we just felt, as much as we could, dig that out and bring more people into the fold. Because that’s what was happening in the United States, it wasn’t just white women posting. So, it was nice to have that kind of broader view of a 19th century publishing world.

Q. What was your biggest inspiration in publishing? Radicals?

Stabel: I think it’s really energizing to read these “weird things” written by these women who today we think of them as sort of “main and proper” and “suffragists” and “whatever they were focusing on.” was to get the vote “or sort of suffering inside oppressive marriages, but they were actually full people, just like we are today. And so it was really fun and kind of encouraging to see. They could write about smoking hashish, they could show that they too are sexual beings. They might be writing a romance. It is not just about activism; It’s just a matter of them being creative. And so that inspired me.

DI. What’s your favorite book ?

Stabel: My favorite book is Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. I read it, like, at least once a year, and I watch the movie a million times a year. I mean, Jane Austen is just the master, right? She is so funny. She’s so smart. And now I’m at the point where, reading the book, I feel like the characters are my family, so I feel like it’s very heartwarming and intimate to reread it.

DI. This is your first published book – so what’s been the feeling, like you’re happy with the reaction? How was it?

Stabel: Yeah, honestly that’s right, I can’t believe it. So, we got reviewed in Publishers Weekly, and it was so out of the blue. It’s surprising because you don’t get any warning, it’s like someone sent it to you. And they didn’t hate it, so, yeah, it was very surreal. And then somebody sent me a picture of the book that’s in Powell’s bookstore in Portland, which – I’m a fan of bookstores in every town I go to. I had just been in that one, never having thought I would have a book on the shelf, so I don’t know. I have no words, as sometimes really crazy stuff happens.


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