American book – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 19:47:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://harpmaker.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png American book – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ 32 32 Nakashima continues American march to Wimbledon with upset Shapovalov https://harpmaker.net/nakashima-continues-american-march-to-wimbledon-with-upset-shapovalov/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 19:27:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/nakashima-continues-american-march-to-wimbledon-with-upset-shapovalov/ LONDON, June 30 (Reuters) – Brandon Nakashima extended America’s charge at Wimbledon this year when he ousted last year’s semi-finalist Denis Shapovalov with a 6-2 4-6 6-1 7-6 victory (6) in the second round Thursday. Nakashima became the seventh player from the United States to book a place in the third round of the grass-court […]]]>

LONDON, June 30 (Reuters) – Brandon Nakashima extended America’s charge at Wimbledon this year when he ousted last year’s semi-finalist Denis Shapovalov with a 6-2 4-6 6-1 7-6 victory (6) in the second round Thursday.

Nakashima became the seventh player from the United States to book a place in the third round of the grass-court Grand Slam this year with a guaranteed eighth place as Maxime Cressy and Jack Sock face off in an all-American battle.

Top-ranked American Taylor Fritz, John Isner, Jenson Brooksby, Tommy Paul, Steve Johnson and Frances Tiafoe are the others to have reached this stage – the most at a Grand Slam since the 1996 US Open and the most at Wimbledon in 27 years. .

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Nakashima, 20, ranked 56th in the world, hit 22 game winners while limiting his unforced errors to 14 to defeat Canadian southpaw Shapovalov.

“It was amazing there. Playing against such a top player on one of the biggest stages, it doesn’t get much better than that,” Nakashima said after his win. “Every game I think my game is progressing in the right direction.

“I learn a lot from these matches, win or lose. I think reaching the third round in Paris was important for my confidence.

“Just knowing that I could compete with these top players at the Grand Slam. Making the third round here is another step in the right direction.”

Shapovalov agreed, predicting a “bright future” for his opponent.

“He stayed extremely solid. It was very difficult to find weaknesses,” said the Canadian, who has now lost seven of his last eight games.

“He didn’t give me much to fish for. He was just playing a great game, serving well, coming back well. He played really well from the back. Yeah, I mean, it was hard for me to find a lot of solutions.”

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Reporting by Sudipto Ganguly; Editing by Ken Ferris

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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The Day – Colchester’s first councilor calls for RuPaul’s book to be removed from the public library https://harpmaker.net/the-day-colchesters-first-councilor-calls-for-rupauls-book-to-be-removed-from-the-public-library/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 19:30:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/the-day-colchesters-first-councilor-calls-for-rupauls-book-to-be-removed-from-the-public-library/ Colchester – First coach Andreas Bisbikos has asked the city’s public library to remove a book about American entertainer and drag queen RuPaul, claiming it contained a sexually provocative image. According to Colchester Library director Kate Byroade, the book, “Who is RuPaul?”has not been removed from the library but is under review by library staff. […]]]>

Colchester – First coach Andreas Bisbikos has asked the city’s public library to remove a book about American entertainer and drag queen RuPaul, claiming it contained a sexually provocative image.

According to Colchester Library director Kate Byroade, the book, “Who is RuPaul?”has not been removed from the library but is under review by library staff.

Bisbikos announced Monday morning on Facebook that a parent had “raised a serious concern about a book found in the children’s section of the library”.

“The book contains sexually provocative drawings in which the parent found offensive,” Bisbikos continued. “The book in question was immediately withdrawn from circulation. I have instructed Kate Byroade, our library manager, to begin an inventory of children’s materials. We encourage parents who encounter any material in the children’s section that may be considered questionable to bring it to the attention of library staff immediately.

The post sparked a maelstrom of critical comments from Colchester residents accusing Bisbikos of censorship and homophobia.

Byroade clarified Bisbikos’ statement on Monday, noting that the book had not been removed from the library’s collection but instead, “We checked it internally because we are reviewing it.”

“However, we have not received an official Statement of Concern form regarding library resources,” she said. “I have no idea who brought this to the first coach.”

Byroade explained the process, which neither the first selector nor the complaining parent followed, to request the removal of a book.

“The process is we have a form, a person fills it out, my staff and I review the item, we respond to the person. If they’re not happy with our response, then they can go to the selectors’ council, and the selectors’ council would have the final decision,” Byroade said.

“Who is RuPaul?” is part of a popular series of children’s books of short biographies of past and present public figures, be it Napoleon, Joan of Arc, Oprah Winfrey, Dolly Parton or others.

Byroade said the illustration a parent apparently took issue with “depicts a woman, it could be someone in drag, but it looks like a woman to me, with thigh high boots and a bustier, which is what basically every woman wears superheroes, and some women are dancing.

“It was explained to me as sexually provocative, and I don’t find it sexually provocative, so I said no,” Byroade said. “They said it was a sexually provocative image. That was the complaint. I don’t know what to do about you. We’re going to review the book. Normally we’d wait for a form and then we’d review the book.

“I was really surprised it was this book, and I think we featured it on our Pride exhibit at the children’s department,” Byroade added.

In her more than 12 years as a library manager, she said she can remember only one other instance when someone asked for a book to be removed. “The only other complaint I got about a book was literally that the book was in terrible shape, and when I saw the book I said, ‘Yeah. He is in a terrible state. We will remove it from the collection.'”

Byroade said she was aware of the surrounding national climate censorship and homophobia issues. This month, the Proud Boys, a far-right group, stormed libraries in California and North Carolina during LGBTQIA+ themed children’s storytimesloudly proclaiming their objections to drag queens.

On June 24, the American Library Association issued a statement condemning the threat of violence in libraries across the country and the targeting of LGBTQIA+ material. A spokesperson for the association referred The Day to the statement when asked about the situation in Colchester:

“The American Library Association condemns, in the strongest possible terms, the violence, threats of violence, and other acts of intimidation that increasingly occur in American libraries, especially those acts that are intended to erasing the histories and identities of gay, queer, transgender, Black, Indigenous, people of color, people with disabilities and religious minorities,” the statement read. “ALA stands with our members, all library workers and of those who lead libraries who bravely face threats to their personal and professional well-being as a result of their efforts to celebrate diversity and foster inclusion in their communities, in the belief that every human being deserves respect and dignity . ALA stands with our LGBTQIA+ colleagues and other library workers who are disproportionately affected by these attacks. »

ACLU Connecticut Executive Director David McGuire commented on the situation in Colchester after seeing news reports on the subject, noting that “the book bans are misguided and inappropriate attempts to try to remove our right of access to the information of the First Amendment.”

“The Colchester First Selectman’s attempt to remove a book about RuPaul Charles, an Emmy-winning television producer and black gay man, is the latest example of the kinds of book bans taking place across the country, which specifically aim to remove books that are by and about people of color, LGBTQ people and other marginalized people,” McGuire said in the statement. “These book bans seek to erase the history and lived experiences of women, people of color and LGBTQ people and to censor conversations about race, gender and sexuality that impact the daily lives of young people. We all have the right to read and learn for free from viewpoint-based censorship, and young people have the First Amendment right to read and learn the history and viewpoints of all communities. in our libraries.

About four hours after his initial post, Bisbikos returned to Facebook to clarify his position in response to requests for clarification from townspeople.

“There was never any question of censorship and the First Selectman plays no role in books purchased or displayed in our library,” Bisbikos wrote. “I was just trying to address a concern from a parent in our town. It was never about permanently deleting books, just wondering if they belonged in the children’s section or the section adults; therefore, I contacted our Director of Library Services.

“I have advised the parent that they have five days to file the appropriate documents with the library by submitting their complaint in writing, in which case it will be the Director of Library Services and only the Director of Library Services , who will have the duty to respond,” he added. .

He answered questions from The Day via email on Tuesday morning. He said the issue was age suitability.

The fact that “Who is RuPaul?” Part of a children’s book series is “inconsequential,” Bisbikos said.

“The question was whether a sexually provocative image should be placed in the children’s section of the library and if not, can we find a more age-appropriate location,” he said. writing.

Asked if he still found the book inappropriate after Monday’s public outcry, Bisbikos said his “concerns were with the placement of a book containing a sexually provocative image, not the book itself.”

Bisbikos denied that the original complaint and his supporting action were the result of homophobia. “The decision to review the book has nothing to do with anyone’s sexual orientation or social issues,” he wrote. “None of the other Pride Books have been taken down. If this image had been found in a book about George Washington in the children’s section, there would have been an identical response.

The first elected also rejected the accusations of censorship: “Nothing is prohibited or censored”, he writes. “Books may be examined to determine if they are placed according to their age in the library.”

Bisbikos said he believed the parent would file a formal complaint on Tuesday, if they hadn’t already.

He pushed once again for an inventory of the children’s section of the library.

“Protecting our children is important,” he said. “I think it’s imperative that we review to see if there are other books that may contain sexually suggestive imagery and if we consider placing them in a more age-appropriate location.”

This is a developing story.

s.spinella@theday.com

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A reading conference with author Madhushree Ghosh will be held virtually on June 30 https://harpmaker.net/a-reading-conference-with-author-madhushree-ghosh-will-be-held-virtually-on-june-30/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 00:22:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/a-reading-conference-with-author-madhushree-ghosh-will-be-held-virtually-on-june-30/ A discussion of Khabaar, a culinary memoir and personal narrative that weaves South Asian food’s global journeys through immigration, migration and engagement, will be held virtually with author Madhushree Ghosh at 2 p.m. on the 30th June. The discussion is co-sponsored by Page Turners of Del Mar Community Connections and the Book Talk groups of […]]]>

A discussion of Khabaar, a culinary memoir and personal narrative that weaves South Asian food’s global journeys through immigration, migration and engagement, will be held virtually with author Madhushree Ghosh at 2 p.m. on the 30th June. The discussion is co-sponsored by Page Turners of Del Mar Community Connections and the Book Talk groups of the Del Mar Library. Ghosh, a San Diego County resident, will guest star and discuss her new book. Lisa Fugard, notable New York Times author, will moderate the discussion.

The cover of “Khabaar: An Immigration Journey of Food, Memory and Family”

(Courtesy)

Registration is mandatory. Those interested in participating will find the registration link at dmcc.cc/calendar, or they can call the DMCC office at (858) 792-7565 for assistance.

Ghosh’s work focuses on food, immigrant journeys, social justice in particular, women of color in science. Gosh’s work was nominated by Pushcart and was the 2020 Notable Mention in America’s Best Essays in Food Writing. She has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Longreads, Catapult, Guernica, BOMB Magazine, Panorama, The Rumpus, DAME, Hippocampus and others. Gosh holds a PhD in Biochemistry and actively mentors emerging female leaders in science and works in global oncology diagnostics.

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List of Best Biblioracle Books of 2022 (So Far) https://harpmaker.net/list-of-best-biblioracle-books-of-2022-so-far/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/list-of-best-biblioracle-books-of-2022-so-far/ Somehow we’re halfway through 2022, which has resulted in a series of lists of the best books of 2022 so far, including Barnes & Nobles and Squire. Far be it from me to let anyone else have a head start on what books we should be talking about at the end of the year, so […]]]>

Somehow we’re halfway through 2022, which has resulted in a series of lists of the best books of 2022 so far, including Barnes & Nobles and Squire.

Far be it from me to let anyone else have a head start on what books we should be talking about at the end of the year, so here is my “Best Books of the Year from Biblioracle (up to now) which is a better list than anyone Else’s Best Books of the Year list (so far).

“Ancestor Problem” by Maud Newton: I think we will consider this book a classic in the way it combines historical research, science, personal memory and philosophy. A fascinating and in-depth exploration of Newton’s family tree in the context of who we are and where we come from, unraveling some mysteries while introducing others. A book that keeps on giving even after reading the last page.

“The Race to the Top: Asian Americans and Whites Chasing the American Dream in Suburban Schools” by Natasha Warikoo: There has been a lot of heat without much light around affirmative action issues in elite college admissions. Here is an absorbing ethnographic work by Professor Warikoo of Tufts University that examines the complex power and social dynamics at work in a system where success seems both rare and an absolute imperative. Strikes a good balance between academic and popular audiences, so either group will be satisfied.

“Foreverland: On the Divine Boredom of Marriage” by Heather Havrilesky: The humorless growlers of the world have tried to convince themselves that an honest exploration of the ways in which those we are closest to can also be our greatest sources of frustration is somehow a problem, but they are wrong. . This book is a delight. Funny, honest and deeply romantic, Havrilesky does the world a favor by letting us experience his spirit and his marriage.

“Rethinking Fandom: How to beat the sports-industrial complex at its own game” by Craig Calcaterra: If you’re like me and love sports, but are increasingly dismayed by the “sports-industrial complex,” Calcaterra’s book will be a balm to keep that fandom going without shutting down eyes on the myriad problems and sources of exploitation on the ground.

“Look for” by Michelle Huneven: One of my ultimate comfort reads, Huneven manages to cast a spell that has you deeply invested in a committee’s ultimate decision to search for a new minister for a Unitarian Universalist congregation. These people dig into you as if they were your neighbors.

“Joan is fine” by Weike Wang: Wang’s dry wit in this story of an ICU doctor dealing with (sort of) his father’s death is irresistible.

“Sea of ​​Tranquility” by Emily St. John Mandel: That this novel appears on the B&N and Esquire lists as well as mine speaks to a few things. First, St. John Mandel writes books that many readers look forward to. Second, Mandel responds to this anticipation, in a big way. Not quite a sequel so much as a companion to “The Glass Hotel”, “Sea of ​​Tranquility” is somehow both an enjoyable and invigorating read.

“Mouth to mouth” by Antoine Wilson: Just a delightful little work of psychological intrigue and suspense that delivers one of the most satisfying plot kicks I’ve experienced in years.

“House of the Devil” by John Darnielle: Framed as the story of a journalist researching and writing a true crime book about an alleged satanic murder, Darnielle turns the book into an exploration of memory, narrative and how the stories we tell depends a lot on who can do the telling.

John Warner is the author of “Why They Can’t Write: Killing the Five-Paragraph Essay and Other Necessities”.

Twitter @biblioracle

Biblioracle book recommendations

John Warner tells you what to read based on the last five books you read

1. “The Woodland Boy” by Harlan Coben

2. “City on Fire” by Don Winslow

3. “Two nights in Lisbon” by Chris Pavone

4. “The Chain” by Adrian McKinty

5. “The Nickel Boys” by Colson Whitehead

—Bill T., Chicago

I think Bill will be in Olen Steinhauer’s Milo Weaver series, in which a spy tries to get out of the game, but keeps getting sucked in. The first volume is “The Tourist”.

1. “60 stories” by Donald Barthelme

2. “Lincoln in the Bardo” by George Saunders

3. “Misplaced” by Dana Spiotta

4. “Away” by Hernan Diaz

5. “Sea of ​​Tranquility” by Emily St. John Mandel

—Mary P., Sacramento

Mary sounds like someone with an interest in fiction that tackles big existential questions obliquely, and Benjamin Labatut’s “When We Stop Understanding the World” seems to fit that mindset well.

1. “The Book of Form and Void” Ruth Ozeki

2. “A Separation” by Katie Kitamura

3. “Hamnet” by Maggie O’Farrell

4. “No country for old people” by Cormac McCarthy

5. “The Cold Millions” by Jess Walter

— Bea P., Tallahassee, Florida

Bea is drawn to a good story with lots of intrigue, but she should also be attached to the character and even a unique author’s voice. For me, this is in addition to “The Sisters Brothers” by Patrick deWitt.

Get a reading from the Biblioracle

Send a list of the last five books you read and your hometown to biblioracle@gmail.com.

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American children deserve to be educated about the climate crisis https://harpmaker.net/american-children-deserve-to-be-educated-about-the-climate-crisis/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:05:36 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/american-children-deserve-to-be-educated-about-the-climate-crisis/ The Scopes lawsuit on the evolution of teaching in schools has made headlines in the United States. (Image: Lib. of Congress) American society is changing. Or does it? Nearly 100 years after Scopes’ “trial of the monkeys” pitted evolution against creationism, school science is still in the crosshairs, especially the science of climate change. In […]]]>

The Scopes lawsuit on the evolution of teaching in schools has made headlines in the United States. (Image: Lib. of Congress)

American society is changing. Or does it? Nearly 100 years after Scopes’ “trial of the monkeys” pitted evolution against creationism, school science is still in the crosshairs, especially the science of climate change. In State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes of 1925, a public school substitute teacher was prosecuted for violating the newly passed law. Anti-evolution law, who made it a crime “to teach any theory which denies the story of the divine creation of man as taught in the Bible and to teach instead that man is descended from a lower order of animals”. The law was the first of its kind. Tennessee lawmakers acquiesced to church leaders who embraced a strict interpretation of the Bible and frequently spoke out against the threat they saw in Darwinism.

The fervent fundamentalist and populist triple candidate for the presidency William Jennings Bryan, who believed teaching children about evolution would threaten the moral compass of the nation, agreed to pursue the case. The trial was a movie-worthy sight, immortalized in the 1960 Hollywood film Inherit the wind, and although Bryan came out bruised, he ultimately made it through. Scopes was found guilty by a jury of violating the Anti-Evolution Law.

Other states have followed Tennessee’s lead. Surprisingly, it took until 1987 for the United States Supreme Court tear down all laws prohibiting the teaching of evolution because they represented an unconstitutional promotion of religion.

Today, however, fundamentalism has taken on a new form.

The Florida Department of Education recently rejected 54 math – yes, math – textbooks because they alluded to “prohibited subjectsincluding climate change, social-emotional learning (which conservatives say it’s a gateway to liberalism), and critical race theory. How? In one case, the legend of a bar chart describes how the data “measures levels of racial prejudice.” Even the idea that racism might still exist in the United States is considered forbidden in Florida.

It’s quite catchy and clearly a case of fanning the flames of current-era conservatism by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, who likely has presidential aspirations. I say “clearly” because the state Department of Education has no say in approving or banning textbooks — local school districts do. Therefore, there is little significance in the entire state review process other than making headlines.

But what also caught my attention was this comment of a reviewer who rejected a textbook called Mathematics for College Liberal Arts for “talking about a climate crisis as if it were a proven fact.” She pointed to an exercise in which “you can say” the playbook “favors Al Gore and dislikes Rush Limbaugh” in “an argument” about climate change.

In many school districts across the country, it’s typical for a handful of individuals to have the power to dismiss physical and social science facts if they don’t fit their worldview. Just as the teaching of Darwinian evolution has been banned for decades and American history has been whitewashed in schools today, anthropogenic climate change is often called too controversial to be taught properly in some of the most populous states in the country.

According to a study published in 2020 by the National Center for Science Education and the Texas Freedom Network Education Fund, 10 states received failing grades or failing grades (D and F) for their climate change education standards, four of them among the 10 states the most populous in the United States: Florida (D), Ohio (D), Texas (F) and Pennsylvania (F). With the exception of Keystone State, all other northeastern states received A or B grades, as did the west coast states. The South performed poorly, with Alabama, Georgia and Virginia all receiving failing grades. As journalist and author Katie Worth points out in her recent book Bad education: how climate change is taught in Americathe model suggests that there is a red-blue policy divide between states that properly teach climate science and those that seek to water down the science.

It remains to be seen whether the textbook revisions at the Florida state level will have any effect at the school district level. But because the federal government is mostly indifferent in terms of pedagogy, textbook publishers have to contend with fifty powerful education departments and indeed hundreds of local districts. It may be easier for them to answer to the lowest common denominator.

When climate change is not properly taught, students are not the only ones affected. Parents are also affected. A study middle school students in North Carolina found that parents were increasingly concerned about the climate crisis after their children learned about it. This intergenerational effect manifested itself most strongly in conservative families. Daughters were particularly influential and fathers were particularly influenced.

It is important to note that people who align themselves with the political right are not the only ones with blinders. Despite the lack of scientific evidence, unfounded fears about genetically modified crops and vaccines are harbored by people from all political backgrounds. The scientific community has, until now, struggled to counter this kind of confusion, which can lead to hostility towards life-saving genetic and medical advances.

When it comes to accepting or “believing” in climate change, opinion polls have found that answers can say more about their values ​​and social identity than about their actual knowledge of climate science. Like the theory of evolution, pre-existing worldviews as well as commitments to religious and social groups can interfere with a person’s understanding of climate science.

We are therefore in a positive feedback loop that perpetuates climate inaction. Politicians and parents, true to their beliefs, are pressuring school districts not to teach the state of the science of climate change, i.e. it’s real, it’s us, it’s bad, and there’s hope. Fewer students are coming to a deep understanding of the climate threat, and fewer still are talking about it to their parents and extended family. Students remain misinformed and parents remain misinformed.

In contrast, young people who have been made aware of the climate crisis have proven capable of leading by example. Researchers at San José State University students followed who had taken a crash college course in climate change and found they were making more environmentally friendly decisions than their peers for years afterwards. These decisions—which car to buy; what foods to eat; how to get rid of waste – added up to 2.86 tonnes less carbon dioxide emissions per student per year.

There are people and organizations trying to correct things. The National Center for Science Education asks that states reflect the scientific consensus on climate change in their state science standards. The Next Generation Science Standards, based on the collective advice of the National Research Council, the National Science Teaching Association, and the American Association of the Advancement of Science, among others, have been used to formulate teaching standards in 20 states and the District of Columbia . This supports 36% of public school students nationwide, but what about the remaining 64%?

It may take time, but I think there is a good chance that a strong climate program will spread to the rest of the country. So far, the so-called adults in many school district council rooms have seemed so indifferent that they are willing to sacrifice the future of their children and grandchildren. But as the climate crisis worsens, more americans internalize the threat. Four out of seven people today are at least concerned about global warming. The number of people alarmed by the rapidly changing climate reached 33%.

Redoubled efforts to properly educate about the state of climate change science and solutions to the crisis will outlast national moods and political swings. As the National Center for Science Education deputy director Glenn Branch wrote in the Newsletter more than five years ago, “effective action against climate change will necessarily be a long-term, multi-generational project”. Over time, the younger generations can only benefit from this education. And they may just save the planet.

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I Prevail Book 2022 North American Tour with Pierce the Veil https://harpmaker.net/i-prevail-book-2022-north-american-tour-with-pierce-the-veil/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 15:08:41 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/i-prevail-book-2022-north-american-tour-with-pierce-the-veil/ I Prevail has just booked a series of North American tour dates in 2022, consisting of two legs, with support from Pierce the Veil, Fit for a King and more. The first trek will begin September 9 in Asbury Park, NJ through October 9 in Chicago, Illinois. Pierce the Veil, Fit for a King and […]]]>

I Prevail has just booked a series of North American tour dates in 2022, consisting of two legs, with support from Pierce the Veil, Fit for a King and more.

The first trek will begin September 9 in Asbury Park, NJ through October 9 in Chicago, Illinois. Pierce the Veil, Fit for a King and Yours Truly will join them on select dates. Then the rematch begins with two performances at the When We Were Young festival in Las Vegas on October 22 and 23, then continues on the 24th in Los Angeles. Stand Atlantic will serve as the third act for this second run, in addition to Pierce the Veil and Fit for a King.

Tickets go on sale Friday, June 24 at 10 a.m. local time. See all dates below, and get tickets here.

The tour is in support of I Prevail’s upcoming new album. true power, which they just announced earlier this month with the release of the song “Body Bag”. The disc will be released on August 19 via Fearless Records, and possibly pre-ordered/saved here.

I Prevail 2022 North American Tour (Stage 1)

September 9 – Asbury Park, NJ @ Stone Pony Summer Stage
September 10 – Danville, Virginia @ Blue Ridge Rock Fest*
September 11 – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania @ UPMC Events Center
September 13 – Indianapolis, Ind. @ Egyptian Hall at the Old National Center
September 14 – Oshkosh, Wis. @ Oshkosh Arena
September 16 – St. Paul, Minnesota @ Myth Live
September 17 – Ralston, Neb. @Liberty First Credit Union Arena#
September 18 – Wichita, Kan. @ Vague
September 20 – Oklahoma City, Okla. @ The Criterion
September 21 – San Antonio, Texas @ Tech Port Center
September 23 – Lubbock, Texas @ Lonestar Amphitheater
Sept. 24 – Dallas, TX @ South Side Ballroom
September 25 – Houston, TX @ White Oak Music Hall
September 27 – St. Petersburg, Florida @ Jannus Live
September 28 – Atlanta, Georgia @ Tabernacle
September 29 – Lake Buena Vista, Fla. @ House of Blues
October 1 – Silvers Spring, Maryland @ The Fillmore Silver Spring
October 2 – New York, NY @ The Rooftop at Pier 17
Oct. 4 — Montreal, Quebec @ L’Olympia
October 5 – Toronto, Ont. @ Rebel
October 7 – Strong. Wayne, Indiana @ The Clyde Theater
October 8 – Grand Rapids, Michigan @ GLC Live at 20 Monroe
October 9 – Chicago, Illinois @ Byline Bank Aragon Ballroom

* I Prevail & Pierce The Veil Only // Festival date

I Prevail 2022 North American Tour (Stage 2)

October 22 – Las Vegas, Nevada @ When We Were Young Fest*
October 23 – Las Vegas, Nevada @ When We Were Young Fest*
October 24 – Los Angeles, CA @ The Wiltern
October 26 – San Jose, CA @ San Jose Civic
October 28 – Phoenix, Arizona @ The Van Buren
October 29 – Las Vegas, Nevada @ When We Were Young Fest*
October 31 – Reno, Nevada @ Grand Sierra Resort & Casino
November 1 – Boise, Idaho @ Revolution Concert House and Event Center
November 2 – Salt Lake City, Utah @ The Complex
November 4 – Denver, Colorado @ Fillmore Auditorium
November 6 – Kansas City, Mo. @ Uptown Theater
November 8 – Milwaukee, Wis. @ The Rave
November 9 – St. Louis, Mo. @ The Factory
November 11 – Cleveland, Ohio @ Agora Theater
November 12 – Cincinnati, Ohio @ Andrew J Brady Music Center
November 13 – Nashville, TN @ Marathon Music Works
November 15 – Myrtle Beach, SC @ House of Blues
Nov. 18 – Philadelphia, PA @ The Fillmore Philadelphia
November 19 – Cambridge, Mass. @ MGM Music Hall in Fenway
November 20 – Buffalo, NY @ Buffalo Riverworks
November 22 – Detroit, Michigan @ The Fillmore

* I Prevail & Pierce The Veil Only // Festival date

55 Best Metal Covers of Classic Rock Hits

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Dom Phillips, British correspondent in Brazil, dies at 57 https://harpmaker.net/dom-phillips-british-correspondent-in-brazil-dies-at-57/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 22:59:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/dom-phillips-british-correspondent-in-brazil-dies-at-57/ Placeholder while loading article actions Dom Phillips, a Brazil-based British journalist who had written for the Washington Post, the Guardian and other news outlets and was a leading columnist of the devastating environmental effects of deforestation in the Amazon, died in the remote valley from Javari, in western Brazil, where he was looking for a […]]]>
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Dom Phillips, a Brazil-based British journalist who had written for the Washington Post, the Guardian and other news outlets and was a leading columnist of the devastating environmental effects of deforestation in the Amazon, died in the remote valley from Javari, in western Brazil, where he was looking for a book. He was 57 years old.

According to media reports, he and Bruno Araújo Pereira, an expert on the country’s indigenous peoples, were traveling by boat on the Itaquai River in the Brazilian state of Amazonas, known in recent years for increasing violence by illegal fishermen, loggers and drug traffickers. Both men were last seen alive on June 5.

Police announced on Friday that human remains recovered from a remote forest belonged to Mr Phillips. A fisherman this week confessed to killing the journalist and his traveling companion, police said, and led investigators to a remote location where the remains were buried.

Authorities have not announced whether another set of human remains collected belong to Pereira, but testing continues. No cause of death has been confirmed, but police say it is likely the men were shot. At least two men are in custody and police expect more arrests to be made soon.

Mr Phillips, a former music journalist in England, had lived in Brazil since 2007. He learned Portuguese and married a Brazilian and lived in São Paolo, Rio de Janeiro and more recently Salvador, the capital of the state of northeast of Bahia.

He was a versatile journalist who wrote about politics, poverty and cultural developments in Brazil. As a contributor to The Post from 2014 to 2016, he covered the country’s preparations for the World Cup soccer tournament and the 2016 Summer Olympics. He then examined whether the Games had conferred an advantage sustainability in Rio de Janeiro.

“Three months after the successful hosting of the Summer Olympics, Brazil’s cultural hub is set to soar,” he wrote in The Post. “Instead, it’s a financial, political and criminal mess.”

Mr. Phillips was particularly drawn to the plight of Brazil’s natural world and the indigenous peoples living deep within the Amazon rainforest. He traveled across the country to report on deforestation, as farmers and other business interests destroyed large swaths of Brazil’s once-dense rainforests. He led the The Guardian’s Investigation large cattle ranches established on cleared forest land.

“Dom is one of the most ethical and courageous journalists I know,” Andrew Fishman, an American journalist working in Brazil, told the Latin American news service CE Noticias Financieras. “He has always been extremely rigorous in his work and incisive in his analyses.”

In 2019, Mr Phillips asked Bolsonaro about deforestation in the countryside. Bolsonaro, who favors mining and other business developments, replied: “First of all, you have to understand that the Amazon belongs to Brazil, not to you.”

A video of the exchange caused a stir among Bolosanaro supporters, who used it to bolster their view that the president was being attacked by the media.

“Dom was very shaken by this video,” Fishman said. “He felt it put a target on his back and made his job more difficult.”

In 2018, Mr Phillips joined Pereira and photographer Gary Calton on a 17 day trip in the Amazon – nearly 600 miles by boat and a 45-mile trek on foot – as Pereira, then a government official, tried to make contact with isolated indigenous groups.

“As he crouches in the mud by a fire,” Mr Phillips wrote in an evocative story for the Guardian, “Bruno Pereira, an official with the Brazilian government’s indigenous agency, opens the boiled skull of a monkey with a spoon and eats its brains for breakfast as he discusses politics.

Mr Phillips dubbed some of the people he met “the ninjas of this forest, [who] are as protective as they are at home. They fish for piranhas and hunt, butcher and cook birds, monkeys, sloths and boars to eat them.

When a local man was asked if agricultural development and mining should be allowed in indigenous territories, he replied: “No. We take care of our land.

Mr. Phillips has returned to the Javari Valley several times to conduct research for a book tentatively titled “How to Save the Amazon”. He received a grant from the Alicia Patterson Foundation to help fund his reporting.

In recent years, the region had become increasingly dangerous, with more than 150 environmental activists killed in Brazil between 2009 and 2020, according to the Latin American Journalism Project. Tierra de Resistentes.

After Mr Phillips and Pereira failed to show up for a meeting scheduled for June 5, Aboriginal people reported a boat following them.

Mr Phillips’ wife, Alessandra Sampaio, has called on the Brazilian government to act quickly to find her husband and Pereira. Brazilian celebrities, including soccer star Pelé, joined the public appeal. News outlets – such as The Post, The Guardian and The New York Times, all of which Mr Phillips had written for – published an open letter demanding that the Brazilian government “urgently intensify and fully fund its efforts” to find men.

When Bolsonaro was informed of their disappearance, he seemed to suggest that they were at fault.

“Anything can happen,” he said. “It could have been an accident. They could have been executed.”

After the discovery of their remains, Bolsonaro said, “This Englishman was hated in the region. … He should have more than redoubled the precautions he was taking. And he decided to go on an excursion instead.

The statement caused an uproar in Brazil and abroad.

“The victims are not the culprits,” one of Bolsoanaro’s political opponents, Orlando Silva, said in a tweet.

Dominic Mark Phillips was born on July 23, 1964 in Bebington, a town near Liverpool in the Merseyside region of northwest England. He left college to travel in the 1980s and lived in Israel, Greece, Denmark and Australia, taking odd jobs including picking fruit, working as a chef and cleaning a meat factory.

He became a devotee of a form of electronic dance music called house, and in the late 1980s helped found an art magazine in Bristol, England. He moved to London in 1990 and worked as an editor at Mixmag, a magazine chronicling house music. He coined the term “progressive house” to describe “a new breed of harsh but melodious, hard-hitting but reflective, uplifting and trancey British house”.

He left publishing in 1999 to produce documentaries and music videos. In 2009, he published “DJ Superstars, let’s go!”, a book described in a Guardian review as “in part, a memoir of his days in clubs and after-parties awash in champagne, vodka, cocaine and ecstasy”.

Mr Phillips first visited Brazil in 1998. After settling there nine years later, he largely abandoned his nightlife habits and often rose before dawn to stand -up paddle on the waterways.

“On the one hand, it’s like being in Europe or America,” he said in a 2008 interview with DMCWorld magazine, a music publication. “On the other hand, it’s completely different – like entering a glass world where everything looks the same but is actually upside down, upside down, upside down, whatever. … The best thing about this country is the people — they’re really open, friendly and positive. They love the music. Rich or poor, they do their best to make the most of life.

In addition to his wife, the survivors include a sister and a brother.

Mr Phillips turned down several high-profile job offers, preferring to stay in Brazil as a freelance writer, contributing to the Financial Times, Bloomberg News and football magazines. He was well known to international journalists and taught English and volunteered in poor neighborhoods.

“He enjoys seeing the impact of his work on people’s lives,” Cecília Olliveira, founder of Fogo Cruzado, a website documenting violence in Brazil, told CE Noticias Financieras. “He likes to do journalism that makes a difference, that exposes abuse, that helps protect those in need of protection.”

Terrence McCoy in Brazil contributed to this report.

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Braithwaite placed on NCBWA All-America team https://harpmaker.net/braithwaite-placed-on-ncbwa-all-america-team/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 06:50:58 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/braithwaite-placed-on-ncbwa-all-america-team/ MORGANTOWN, WV — Fifth-year senior right-handed pitcher Trey Braithwaite of the West Virginia University baseball team has been named a third-team All-America by the National College Baseball Writers Association (NCBWA), the organization announced Wednesday. Braithwaite was 3-0 with a 1.70 ERA in 22 appearances for the Mountaineers in 2022. The Winchester, Va. native allowed just […]]]>

MORGANTOWN, WV — Fifth-year senior right-handed pitcher Trey Braithwaite of the West Virginia University baseball team has been named a third-team All-America by the National College Baseball Writers Association (NCBWA), the organization announced Wednesday.

Braithwaite was 3-0 with a 1.70 ERA in 22 appearances for the Mountaineers in 2022. The Winchester, Va. native allowed just seven earned runs in 37.0 innings of work, recording eight saves – tied for second in WVU’s single-season record pound — with 36 strikeouts and 20 walks. Also, the opponents only hit .151 against the right-hander.

With the honor, Braithwaite becomes the 24th West Virginia All-American in program history. He is also the first mountaineer to be selected to an All-America team by the NCBWA since Alek Manoah in 2019.

In addition to the All-America honor, Braithwaite was also named to the ABCA/Rawlings East All-Region team Wednesday by the American Baseball Coaches Association.

Braithwaite was named to the All-Big 12 first team last month, joining the senior outfielder austin davis on the squad. He was also placed on the NCBWA Midseason Watch List of the Year on April 27.

WVU finished 33-22 this season, including 14-10 in Big 12 play – the most conference wins since joining the league in 2013.

For more Mountaineers news, follow @WVUBaseball on Twitter, Facebook and instagram.

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Book spotlights remarkable Outer Banks women https://harpmaker.net/book-spotlights-remarkable-outer-banks-women/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 04:08:02 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/book-spotlights-remarkable-outer-banks-women/ Carolista Baum is known to have found herself in front of a bulldozer that had to level the high sand dune of Jockeys Ridge and replace it with a condominium project. Photo: Outer Banks History Center. Reprinted from the Ocracoke Observer. Hannah Bunn West has shone the spotlight on some little-known and influential women in […]]]>
Carolista Baum is known to have found herself in front of a bulldozer that had to level the high sand dune of Jockeys Ridge and replace it with a condominium project. Photo: Outer Banks History Center.

Reprinted from the Ocracoke Observer.

Hannah Bunn West has shone the spotlight on some little-known and influential women in Outer Banks history.

Her new book, “Remarkable Women of the Outer Banks” (The History Press, 2022), reveals seven of these women, from the arrival of the first Europeans to the recent past.

The first chapter begins with the lost colony and introduces Eleanor Dare, wife of Ananias Dare and daughter of John White, the governor of the colony.

During her third trimester of pregnancy, Eleanor arrived in Roanoke in July 1587. On August 18, she gave birth to Virginia Dare, the first English child born in North America. Little is known about what became of them.

At the time, mother/child mortality, even in England, was high, and the fact that Eleanor gave birth in such a primitive setting without medical help caught the author’s attention.

West, who grew up in Kill Devil Hills, provides meticulous details about the times and theories about what happened to the settlers. There are 29 footnotes for the first chapter alone.

“We have sightings of some of the men at this time from the surviving journals of John White and Thomas Hariot and other sources, but we have very little record of the women’s experiences,” West said in an interview. “I chose Eleanor Dare primarily because one of the main purposes of this book was to broaden the lens and examine different perspectives on the well-known history we have on the Outer Banks.”

Other women featured with their own chapters are Chrissy Bowser, Irene Tate, Nellie Myrtle Pridgen, Carolista Baum, Cheryl Shelton-Roberts and Virginia Tillett.

Hannah Bunn West, author of
Hannah Bunn West, author of “Remarkable Women of the Outer Banks”. Picture: Contributed

Prior to the conception of the book, two of these women, Chrissy Bowser and Irene Tate were unfamiliar to the author.

Chrissy Bowser was selected as an African-American landowner after the Civil War. West first heard of her while visiting Island Farm, a living history site on Roanoke Island that depicts life in the mid-1800s.

While baking cornbread, a docent spoke enthusiastically about Bowser, the Etheridge family cook-turned-owner. “She started telling this incredible story of this woman,” West said. “I grew up here and always had an interest in history, but I had never heard of (Bowser). So that was kind of one of the ways one of those women got picked for my book.

Researching Bowser’s life has not been easy. There are still questions regarding certain fundamental aspects of her identity, her year of birth and whether she was born a slave or a free person.

The articles and story sources West found in the local press mostly say that Bowser was born free, but West’s research, which involved sifting through census records, marriage records, and Freedmen’s Colony documents, did not reveal any obvious signs indicating this.

“So instead of coming down definitively one way or the other, I just wanted to present the information as objectively as possible, and point out that hundreds of years ago, the details of the lives of some people were well documented, and others were basically considered insignificant,” West said.

Despite the many footnotes, 186, at the end of the book, the book is not a dry historical report.

West holds a degree in creative writing with a concentration in nonfiction from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and a lifelong passion for history.

By way of introduction, West begins Chapter 4 in the following colorful manner: “The image of a woman walking alone by the seashore is conjured up at the mention of Nelly Myrtle Pridgen by anyone who knew her. The sight of his lean, slightly stooped figure like a stock of sea oats, usually combing the expanse of sand in front of his Nags Head home was as constant and reliable as the rise and fall of the tide for nearly seven decades.

Nelly Myrtle Pridgen.  Photo: Courtesy of Friends of the Family
Nelly Myrtle Pridgen. Photo: Courtesy of Friends of the Family

Pridgen, who died in 1992, actively opposed the development of the Outer Banks and walked around every day collecting items that would become a priceless collection.

How’s that for a childhood memory:

West writes: “On the morning of September 12, 1900, there was an unexpected knock on the door of the Tate family, residents of Kitty Hawk. They answered it to find their neighbor, Elijah Baum, standing with a strange gentleman who looked worn and weary. The stranger took off his cap and introduced himself as Wilbur Wright, from Dayton, Ohio. Little did the Tates know that the man they received would become world famous, along with his brother Orville, for mankind’s first flight.

Irene Tate was only three years old that morning, but the impact of her visit shaped the course of her life. She herself took off by becoming the first female pilot to make a round trip between New York and Miami. Her first time on an airplane predates that of Amelia Earhart, also born in 1897.

Bill and Irene Tate.  Photo provided by the author
Bill and Irene Tate. Photo provided by the author

Tate has had many other accomplishments throughout her long career, logging over 50,000 flight miles and president of the National Aeronautic Association’s Women’s Division.

The writing and selected photos in this chapter show how aloof and austere Kitty Hawk was at the turn of the 20th century – a far cry from where she is today.

The book is loaded with black and white photographs drawn from numerous sources that match the historical tone of the book.

Carolista Baum and Cheryl Shelton-Roberts are two of the most well-known women who have been the subject of many popular press articles. Baum is well known for showing up in front of a bulldozer that was to level the high sand dune of Jockeys Ridge and replace it with a condominium project. She forced the workers to stop that day and the developer later accepted her historical significance. Baum led efforts to make it a state park.

Shelton-Roberts, the only surviving woman in this book, has been a lifelong lover of lighthouses and, through much turmoil, played a key role in moving the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse in 1999 to a safer location. If she hadn’t succeeded, the lighthouse would have fallen into the ocean. Whether to move the lighthouse or leave it to nature aroused strong feelings on both sides. This chapter includes many inside details, including Senator Marc Basnight getting President Clinton’s ear for funding.

This well-written book succeeds on two levels. Women deserve to be included for their accomplishments, and each chapter serves as a historical chapter on the evolving history of the Outer Banks.

The book attracts attention. It seems almost every day someone asks if a particular woman has been included or will be in the next volume, West said.

I, along with many others, have suggestions for other women to be hailed as a Remarkable Outer Banks Woman. But after reading this book, I wouldn’t replace any of them.

West may oblige with other volumes, but that hasn’t been decided.

“Remarkable Women of the Outer Banks” is available for purchase at local Outer Banks independent bookstores, including Books to be Red, and on the Arcadia Publishing website. For a complete list, visit the author’s website at www.hannahwestwrites.com.

This story is provided courtesy of Ocracoke Watcher, a newspaper covering Ocracoke Island. Coastal Review partners with Ocracoke Observer to provide readers with more interesting environmental and lifestyle stories along our coast.

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Hegseth details progressives’ ‘destruction’ of American education in new book, Fox Nation special https://harpmaker.net/hegseth-details-progressives-destruction-of-american-education-in-new-book-fox-nation-special/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 15:13:15 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/hegseth-details-progressives-destruction-of-american-education-in-new-book-fox-nation-special/ NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles! “Fox & Friends Weekend” co-host Pete Hegseth details the “destruction” of government education and how the left has weaponized the classroom as a way to control the political sphere in his new book, “Battle for the American Mind”. Hegseth co-author David Goodwin joined Hegseth to discuss the […]]]>

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

“Fox & Friends Weekend” co-host Pete Hegseth details the “destruction” of government education and how the left has weaponized the classroom as a way to control the political sphere in his new book, “Battle for the American Mind”.

Hegseth co-author David Goodwin joined Hegseth to discuss the impact of progressives on education over a century and how this had an impact on the public forum.

“One of the biggest things is that it was intentional, that they knew what they were doing,” Goodwin told Hegseth on Sunday. “They actually wrote about it in The New Republic, and there was a back and forth debate among various progressives at the time. And they said, if we want to control the political means of this country, we have to control the education system.”

PETE HEGSETH RAISE AWARENESS OF ‘MISEDUCATION OF AMERICA’ WITH NEW SERIES: ‘IT’S THE MOST IMPORTANT THING’

“And it took research until 1915 to see that, but then it unfolded over time,” he continued.

Earlier on Sunday, Hegseth sat down with students who received classical Christian upbringings to discuss the influence of their denominational upbringing amid the push by progressives to overhaul the system.

“Students across the country are missing the true essence of literature, because…it’s a view of history, and it’s a view of worldviews and ideas of people at the time,” Veritas Academy graduate Sarah Jacob said. “And in my school at least, we were taught to fight against those ideas, and that made us people who more fully understand what we believe and what other people believe.”

CLICK HERE TO GET FOX NATION

Noah Settelen, a classical school student from Philadelphia, highlighted how his upbringing provided an inclusive view of the world and all “sides of history”.

“I would like to think that we learn all aspects of history and can focus on all aspects of what happened in the past and what is happening today,” Settelen said. “And then we look at it through the eyes of the ancient Greeks and the eyes of the wise men who came before us, rather than the eyes of people today who tell us that this is right and this is what must be true, when there really is no objective truth today.”

“The truth is what society has made of it,” Settelen said.

A new episode of “Bad Education in America” ​​by Fox Nation airs Sunday night at 10 p.m. ET on Fox News. The episode will be available to stream on Fox Nation for subscribers immediately after.

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