American book – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 23:58:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://harpmaker.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png American book – Harp Maker http://harpmaker.net/ 32 32 UK warned it would recognize Palestine if Israel annexed West Bank, book reveals https://harpmaker.net/uk-warned-it-would-recognize-palestine-if-israel-annexed-west-bank-book-reveals/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 21:57:35 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/uk-warned-it-would-recognize-palestine-if-israel-annexed-west-bank-book-reveals/ The UK Ambassador to the US warned the Trump administration in June 2020 that if Israel continued with its plans to annex large parts of the West Bank, London would officially recognize the State of Palestine, a new book revealed . The message was delivered by Karen Pierce during a meeting she held with US […]]]>

The UK Ambassador to the US warned the Trump administration in June 2020 that if Israel continued with its plans to annex large parts of the West Bank, London would officially recognize the State of Palestine, a new book revealed .

The message was delivered by Karen Pierce during a meeting she held with US President Donald Trump’s Middle East Peace Envoy Avi Berkowitz and Iranian Special Envoy Brian Hook on June 12. 2020, wrote Israeli journalist Barak Ravid in his book “Trump’s Peace”.

Berkowitz and Hook were sent to meet Pierce by Jared Kushner, then a senior White House adviser. As the Trump administration was inundated with calls from world leaders warning the United States not to allow then-Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to move forward with plans to start annexing parts of the West Bank on July 1, 2020, it was the UK’s response that went further and was most surprising to Americans, according to the book.

Ravid speculated that the UK recognizing Palestine would likely have led other countries in Europe like France and Spain to do the same – a domino effect of Palestinian Authority legitimacy that Israel has long feared.

Netanyahu announced his intention to annex large parts of the West Bank in early 2020, apparently under the auspices of the Trump peace plan – although Ravid reported that the administration was caught off guard by the move and took to it. is strongly opposed.

The book suggests that while Kushner was not in favor of the annexation decision, the feeling within the administration at the time was that there was no way to stop Netanyahu from making it happen.

A day before his meeting with Pierce, Berkowitz met a group of senior German diplomats who expressed their total opposition to the annexation plan. “I told them, go see the Palestinians and tell them the annexation is moving forward. Ask them what they want us to try to get for them in return, ”Berkowitz recalled in Ravid’s book.

Ramallah had severed ties with Washington years earlier after Trump recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

Illustration: Then-Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks at an event with then-US President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC on Tuesday, January 28 2020, to announce the Trump administration’s long-awaited plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. (AP Photo / Alex Brandon)

Ravid’s book revealed how strongly Trump opposes Netanyahu’s annexation plans.

According to Ravid, Trump’s ambassador to Israel David Friedman had encouraged the Netanyahu government to annex parts of the West Bank, without carrying out the president’s plan or Kushner’s plan – both of whom were opposed to the idea.

Trump’s Peace, by Barak Ravid

With Friedman’s backing in mind, Netanyahu announced his annexation plans during Trump’s peace plan unveiling ceremony at the White House in January 2020.

Trump and the architect of the peace plan, Kushner, were completely caught off guard by Netanyahu’s statement, according to the book.

The Trump peace plan called for Israel to annex all of its settlements as well as the Jordan Valley as part of a final status agreement. But he did not give a clear timeline, and he did not stipulate that the move would take place from the start, as Netanyahu had planned to do.

Annexation never took place. In the days and weeks that followed, the United States’ negotiations with the United Arab Emirates advanced in a way that allowed Kushner to offer Israel normalization with the United Arab Emirates in return for abandonment. by Netanyahu of his annexation plans – an offer the ex-prime minister ultimately accepted.

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Corinne Tan is the first Chinese-American Girl of the Year https://harpmaker.net/corinne-tan-is-the-first-chinese-american-girl-of-the-year/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 02:44:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/corinne-tan-is-the-first-chinese-american-girl-of-the-year/ The famous doll maker on Thursday unveiled Corinne Tan, a Chinese-American skier, as 2022 Girl of the Year. “Girl of the Year” dolls, which were introduced in 2001, differ from other American Girl dolls in being based on modern characters with contemporary stories, rather than characters related to different periods of American history. “We created […]]]>

The famous doll maker on Thursday unveiled Corinne Tan, a Chinese-American skier, as 2022 Girl of the Year. “Girl of the Year” dolls, which were introduced in 2001, differ from other American Girl dolls in being based on modern characters with contemporary stories, rather than characters related to different periods of American history.

“We created Corinne to be a positive role model that our fans can admire and learn as we all work towards a world where everyone is treated fairly and with respect,” said Jamie Cygielman, CEO of American Girl, in a report.
American Girl has released other Asian American dolls in the past, including Ivy Ling – one doll ultimately abandoned of its historic line. More modern characters have included Jess, the 2006 Japanese-American “Girl of the Year” biracial doll – but Corinne is the first “Chinese-American” Girl of the Year, the company has confirmed.

To develop Corinne, American Girl brought in children’s author Wendy Wan-Long Shang to create two books on the character, “Corinne” and “Corinne to the Rescue”. Shang said she hopes the others will see each other in the new doll.

“What I really hope is that there is a part of Corinne’s story that makes readers feel seen, whether it’s because they’re Asian American, or because ‘they’re part of a blended family, or because they love skiing,’ Shang said in a statement. “I think when readers feel seen, they realize that they matter and their experiences matter, and that they are meant to be the stars of their own stories!”

The Corinne doll, plus a book, retails for $ 110, with other accessories also available for purchase.

The release of the Corinne doll comes after more than a year of public hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Last month, a man attacked a 61-year-old Asian woman with a stone, an incident the New York Police Department’s Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating.
Although anti-Asian incidents occurred before Covid-19 hit, the pandemic has resulted in an increase in public hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Between March 19, 2020 and September 30, 2021, more than 10,000 incidents against Asian Americans were reported to stop the hate AAPI, who began tracking acts of racism and discrimination against Asian Americans during the pandemic.

As part of this year’s launch, American Girl also announced its partnership with AAPI Youth Rising, a non-profit organization of young people raising awareness about xenophobia against Asian Americans. The company said it donated $ 25,000 to their cause.


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The MCU’s invisible racist history unmasked with a Black Captain America https://harpmaker.net/the-mcus-invisible-racist-history-unmasked-with-a-black-captain-america/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 14:00:25 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/the-mcus-invisible-racist-history-unmasked-with-a-black-captain-america/ Isaiah Bradley stands standing with the width and posture of a faded bodybuilder. You can imagine his young himself tearing a tire in half, but now he only has the strength to see the next day. When the Avenger known as the Falcon, played by Anthony Mackie, brings Captain America’s shield, Isaiah is unmoved. “Leave […]]]>

Isaiah Bradley stands standing with the width and posture of a faded bodybuilder. You can imagine his young himself tearing a tire in half, but now he only has the strength to see the next day.

When the Avenger known as the Falcon, played by Anthony Mackie, brings Captain America’s shield, Isaiah is unmoved. “Leave it covered,” he asks sharply. “Those stars and stripes mean nothing good to me.” Soon Isaiah digs up dirt swept away by forces more insidious than any supervillain. Like the love letters on its shelf, America has also kept men like Isaiah Bradley out of sight.

STAGE THIEVES is a countdown that salutes the unforgettable characters of the small screen of the year. Isaiah Bradley is # 4.

Hosted by under-decorated actor Carl Lumbly, Isaiah Bradley bears the burden of injustice as an abandoned super soldier in the Marvel Cinematic Universe; it seems that it is only because of the serum that Isaiah has the strength to take it away. Although narratively adrift, the Disney + series The Falcon and the Winter Soldier is ambitious in its story on the legacy, the legacy and the baggage that gives it weight. The Marvel series premiered two months before the one-year mark of George Floyd’s police murder, and an awareness of systemic racism set the temperature for Sam Wilson’s rise as Captain America (but not until a mediocre white man makes a mess).

Who is Isaiah Bradley?

  • Best quote: “Swear your allegiance to this, my brother. “
  • Famous for: Uncomfortable truths, one hell of a wrist
  • The scene robbery episode: Episode 5, “Truth” (The Falcon and the Winter Soldier)
  • Super power : Inspire Sam Wilson to Bring Change in the MCU
  • Their scientific element: Tennessine. Like the Super Soldier serum that runs through it, tennessine is a rare synthetic chemical. In 2021, Tennessine is also the most recently discovered element, just as Sam Wilson recently “discovered” Isaiah Bradley.
  • Walking song: “Who will save my soul” by Gnarls Barkley

With a deep and laboring voice, actor Carl Lumbly epitomizes generations of establishment pain and resentment as “Isaiah Bradley,” one of many lost black super soldiers in the MCU.Marvel studios

Appropriately titled “Truth”, the episode recalls the heinous Tuskegee experience, a historical fact in American medicine. Conducted by two federal agencies, the experiment aimed to study untreated syphilis. He did it on black men in rural Alabama who were fooled about his true goal. Over a hundred black Americans died from this unethical study; persistent damage on living descendants remains invaluable.

In 2003, Marvel publisher Axel Alonso pitched comic book author Robert Morales with the idea of ​​a Black Captain America with Tuskegee-inspired origins. With artist Kyle Baker, their collaboration became the comic book miniseries Truth: Red, White and Black, which featured Isaiah Bradley, his “forgotten” history as Captain America and the iteration of the Super Soldier serum through the bodies of black men.

With gruff breaths and a drawling Alabama accent, Isaiah speaks as if he is breaking the silence. “They tell us it’s tetanus,” he said, the venom of resentment on his lips. When he recalls how the government tried to blow up subjects to hide “evidence,” Isaiah refutes the word. “These are my men. No proof.

The double standards are revealed when Isaiah details a rescue similar to the one performed by Chris Evans’ blond-haired Steve Rogers in Captain America: The First Avenger. For his actions, Steve received a hero honor. Isaiah was sentenced to 30 years in prison. “They’ll never let a black man be Captain America,” Isaiah warns. “And even if they did, no self-respecting black man would ever want to be.”

“Shoulder the charged of injustice in the Marvel Cinematic Universe “

Few can offer pathos and pain like Carl Lumbly. A veteran television actor, Lumbly is no stranger to the worlds of superheroes. His roles in DC media, namely J’onn J’onnz / Martian Manhunter in the famous Justice League series, allowed Lumbly to touch the humanity of heroes. In one memorable christmas episode, Lumbly’s J’onn sings a beautiful Martian melody as a gift to Superman’s family for their hospitality. In 2017, Lumbly used his talents to live the action as M’yrnn, father of J’onn (David Harewood) in Super girl. More disconnected from Earth in this role, Lumbly’s planetary alien affectionately asks about coffee and chess to a distant son.

The MCU is bringing Lumbly back to Earth. Talk to Vanity Fair, Lumbly unboxed Isaiah’s words to Sam about self-respecting black men. “To me, Isaiah speaks to himself,” Lumbly said. “It’s almost self-deprecating.” Isaiah envies Sam, as someone who can make a meaningful change. “He looks at the Falcon and sees both the potential and the achievement of excellence… and the possibility of all the disappointments that would come if you went too far and failed.”

Isaiah’s story has power. It’s just the MCU’s toothlessness that keeps it from being powerful. Falcon / Winter Soldier proves the franchise can and will pull punches, as evidenced by Sam’s fuzzy demagoguery as the new Captain America demonstrates. For this reason, a targeted prequel, perhaps a direct adaptation of Truth: red, white and black, can give the MCU the courage to be genuinely interesting rather than trusting its intentions.

Late and still not enough, Isaiah Bradley gets the honor of a hero as No.4 in the Reverse Scene thieves from 2021.Marvel studios

Equally baffling is the show’s closing image with Isaiah, his now bronze likeness. It only moves because of Lumbly. What is important to Isaiah? Repairs? Acknowledgement? This is just another question, taken from Jeff Chang’s 2016 book We are well, which offers an insight: “People of color are allowed, if not compelled to perform, and, especially nowadays on issues of race, to edify as well. But do we have the right to lead? “

Isaiah wants to believe the answer is yes. He’s too exhausted to find out.

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier is now streaming on Disney +.


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Jonathan Spence, renowned researcher in China, dies at 85 https://harpmaker.net/jonathan-spence-renowned-researcher-in-china-dies-at-85/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 19:28:41 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/jonathan-spence-renowned-researcher-in-china-dies-at-85/ Jonathan D. Spence, an eminent scholar of China and its vast history who, in books like “God’s Chinese Son: The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom of Hong Xiuquan” (1996) and “The Search for Modern China” (1990), unearthed the past and illuminated its present, died Saturday at his home in West Haven, Connecticut. He was 85 years old. […]]]>

Jonathan D. Spence, an eminent scholar of China and its vast history who, in books like “God’s Chinese Son: The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom of Hong Xiuquan” (1996) and “The Search for Modern China” (1990), unearthed the past and illuminated its present, died Saturday at his home in West Haven, Connecticut. He was 85 years old.

His wife, Annping Chin, said the cause was complications from Parkinson’s disease.

Professor Spence, who taught for over 40 years at Yale University, where his classes were always in high demand, found the big picture of Chinese history in the small details. His deeply documented books probed individual lives and bizarre moments representative of larger cultural forces, wrapping it all in vivid storytelling.

“It’s a delicate spider’s web of a book, skillful, fascinating and precise like Chinese calligraphy,” Diana Preston wrote in the Los Angeles Times in a review of her “Betrayal by the Book” (2001), about a scholar who challenged the Third Manchurian Emperor in the early 1700s. “It’s also annoying because it conjures up so much that still resonates.”

Among Professor Spence’s most ambitious books was “The Research of Modern China,” which was on the New York Times bestseller list and is now standard text. It took an 876-page view of Chinese history, from the decline of the Ming Dynasty in the 1600s to the democratic movement of 1989.

“Other books have attempted to cover the political and social history of China from imperial times to communist times,” Vera Schwarcz wrote in her review of The Times. “But they lack the narrative technique, the richness of the illustrations and the thematic orientation of this work.”

Professor Spence has written over a dozen books in all, beginning in 1966 with “Ts’ao Yin and the Emperor K’ang-hsi: Servant and Master”, based on his thesis on a minor historical figure in the late 1600s and early 1700s.

“There is no need to make big claims about the personal importance of Ts’ao Yin,” he wrote in the preface. “He was not one of the great officials of the Ch’ing dynasty, nor even a major figure of the K’ang-hsi reign. Rather, his importance lies in what the course of his life can tell us about the society in which he lived and the institutional framework in which he operated.

This approach would also guide much of Professor Spence’s later work. The book, Pamela Kyle Crossley, a Chinese scholar at Dartmouth College, said via email, “has transformed the field, and its power of a new movement for storytelling in history has echoed across many other specializations. “.

In “Emperor of China: Self-Portrait of K’ang-hsi” (1974), Professor Spence brought this emperor to life with an unusual technique.

“Jonathan gave us the monarch in his own words,” East Asian scholar Frederic E. Wakeman Jr. said in a speech in 2004 (reproduced in 2010 in Humanities magazine) pronounced when Professor Spence became president of the American Historical Association. “Kangxi spoke directly to the reader – or so it seemed. The book was controversial, as the Emperor’s speech was a collage of a myriad of sources in different contexts. But Kangxi’s voice was crisp and compelling, and the book went beyond the confines of a conventional audience of Chinese scholars to reach a much larger audience.

Emily Hahn, reviewing this book in The Times, said: “Jonathan Spence punctured the translators balloon and let out all the gas.”

A number of other books by Professor Spence have also been released to the general public.

“In the 1970s and 1980s, he almost single-handedly made Chinese history a lively and immediate interest to the general public,” said Professor Crossley. “It’s unusual for a writer with this kind of popular impact to also be at the forefront of scholarly influence and credibility, but Jonathan was.”

A full obituary will be published shortly.


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How do I find a therapist? Why is it so hard right now https://harpmaker.net/how-do-i-find-a-therapist-why-is-it-so-hard-right-now/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/how-do-i-find-a-therapist-why-is-it-so-hard-right-now/ Of all the shortages caused by the pandemic, the shortage of therapists is among the most troubling. The number of people seeking mental health services so far exceeds available appointments that people across America are placed on waiting lists of 10. It’s one thing not to be able to find toilet paper or hand sanitizer; […]]]>

Of all the shortages caused by the pandemic, the shortage of therapists is among the most troubling. The number of people seeking mental health services so far exceeds available appointments that people across America are placed on waiting lists of 10.

It’s one thing not to be able to find toilet paper or hand sanitizer; It’s another to not be able to get help if you are having thoughts of suicide.

As such, there has been a lot of talk lately about how to get more people into therapy. Barriers to care include not only the effort it takes to get an appointment – some people call 30 to 40 offices before they find someone who can take them, The Seattle Times reported – but also heavy insurance requirements that have resulted in a growing number of therapists who will only accept money for a visit that can cost $ 100 or more.

The problem is generally presented as a problem with too few vendors. And there is no doubt that there are good proposals to expand services to reach those who need them most. But other experts have suggested that it’s just as important to have resilient people and caring communities that help reduce the need for therapy in the first place.

In their 2005 book “One Nation Under Therapy”, Christina Hoff Sommers and Dr Sally Satel decried a fragile “aid culture” which is less and less about building a self-sustaining society and more about relying on it. accredited foreigners to guide us. through our personal adversities. While acknowledging that people in crisis are in dire need of professional help, Sommers and Satel argued that all too often therapists deal with the occasional anxiety and sadness, which they say is simply part of the human condition. They warned that excessive soul-searching in some of these cases might actually make people’s sentiment worse.

It’s a delicate balance, of course. On the one hand, it is essential to reduce the stigma that often exists around seeking help when it is most needed. Yet sometimes it is difficult to find vital mental health services when therapists are busy treating low-risk people, some of whom remain in therapy for decades.

The growing demand for therapy may also be influenced by the widely reported fact that Americans have fewer friends and support systems than thirty years ago. According to a June report by Daniel A. Cox and the Survey Center on American Life, “Signs suggest that the role of friends in American social life is in sharp decline. The May 2021 U.S. Outlook Survey finds Americans report having fewer close friendships than before, talking to friends less often, and relying less on friends for personal support.

The pandemic has a role to play in this regard, but Cox noted that other, more lasting factors are at play, including people who spend more time at work and spend twice as much time with their children as adults in the previous generations, “crowding out other relationships, including friendships.

One of the most surprising figures from this survey has been the growth in the number of people who report that they do not have close friends. In 1990, only 3% of Americans said they had no close friends outside of their family; in 2021, more than one in 10 Americans – 12% – said that. In addition, in 1990, 75% of those polled said they had a “best” friend, compared to only 59% of people today. And, of course, Americans marry later, if at all. As Lois Collins wrote for the Deseret News, “When young adults delay marriage and family formation, they’re less likely to either. ”

Finally, the mental health crisis (as describe by The New York Times) cannot be dissociated from the decline in participation in organized religion. Churches and other places of worship have always been places where people made friends and found emotional and even logistical support. In my grandmother’s last years, she found herself more and more alone outside of her family, as her husband and close friends passed away. But she still had a robust social life, almost entirely through the Catholic Church she had attended for 50 years. It is also true that parishioners often look to the clergy for help with difficult problems that may not reach the level of professional mental health counseling.

It is therefore not surprising that people belonging to a religious group have resisted the pandemic better than those who have not. Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for example, report strong social bonds that often correlative with better mental health outcomes. Cox told Deseret News’ Tad Walch that Latter-day Saints have experienced less of the “friendship recession” than other Americans.

“In terms of social connections, they’re doing a lot better than your average American. This has a whole series of advantages. We know that loneliness is incredibly damaging to your emotional health, to your physical health, so being rooted in these communities, having people to rely on to deal with something like a pandemic, which for many people was socially isolating, is just an incredibly good position to be in it, ”Cox said.

Americans are often advised not to talk about religion or politics because the topics are too emotional and divisive. But when we talk about mental health or the need for more therapists, we are doing troubled Americans a disservice by not talking about one simple thing that could improve their mental health: joining a church. There is no waiting list.


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US “Closer to Civil War” Than Most Would Like, New Book Says | american politics https://harpmaker.net/us-closer-to-civil-war-than-most-would-like-new-book-says-american-politics/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 07:02:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/us-closer-to-civil-war-than-most-would-like-new-book-says-american-politics/ The United States is “closer to civil war than any of us would like to believe,” said a member of a key CIA advisory group. Analysis by Barbara f walter, professor of political science at the University of California at San Diego who sits on the Political Instability Working Group, is contained in a book […]]]>

The United States is “closer to civil war than any of us would like to believe,” said a member of a key CIA advisory group.

Analysis by Barbara f walter, professor of political science at the University of California at San Diego who sits on the Political Instability Working Group, is contained in a book to be published next year and reported for the first time by the Washington Post.

It comes amid growing concern over torn political divisions, compounded by former President Donald Trump’s refusal to accept defeat in the 2020 election.

Trump’s lie that his loss to Joe Biden was caused by massive electoral fraud fueled the deadly attack on the United States Capitol on January 6, for which Trump was impeached and acquitted a second time, leaving him free to present themselves again.

The “big lie” is also fueling Republican movements to restrict voting by groups that lean toward Democrats and to facilitate the overturning of election results.

Such measures remain flawless on the part of Democrats seeking a federal response, but thwarted by filibuster, the Senate rule that requires qualified majorities for most laws.

Moreover, although the Republican presidential candidates have won the popular vote only once since 1988, the GOP has, by playing tough politics, filled the Supreme Court with conservatives, who outnumber the liberals. 6-3.

All of these factors and more – including a pandemic that fueled resistance to the government – contributed to the divide that Walter investigated.

Last month she tweeted: “The CIA actually has a task force designed to try to predict where and when political instability and conflict are likely to erupt in the world. It is just not legally allowed to watch the United States. This means that we are blind to the risk factors that are rapidly emerging here. “

The book in which Walter examines these risk factors in the United States, How civil wars begin, will be released in January. According to the Post, Walter writes: “No one wants to believe that their beloved democracy is in decline or is headed for war.

But “if you were an analyst in a foreign country studying events in America – the same way you would look at events in Ukraine, Cote d’Ivoire, or Venezuela – you would make a checklist, assessing each of the conditions that make civil war. likely”.

“And what you would find is that the United States, a democracy founded over two centuries ago, has entered very dangerous territory.”

Walter, the Post said, concludes that the United States has gone through “pre-insurgency” and “nascent conflict” stages and may now be in “open conflict,” starting with the Capitol Riot.

Citing the analyzes used by the Center for Systemic PeaceWalter also says that the United States has become an “anocracy” – “somewhere between a democracy and an autocratic state”.

The United States fought a civil war, from 1861 to 1865, and against states that seceded in an attempt to maintain slavery.

Estimates of the death toll vary. The American Battlefield Trust puts it at 620,000 and said: “As a percentage of the current population, the death toll would have reached 6 million souls.”

On Sunday, Sidney Blumenthal, a former Clinton adviser turned Abraham Lincoln biographer and Guardian contributor, said: “The secessionists of 1861 accepted Lincoln’s election as just and legitimate.

The current situation, he said, “is the opposite. Trump’s questioning of the election, which was initially rejected by Republican leaders after the Capitol bombing, has led to a crisis, a real crisis of legitimacy.

The Republicans’ grip on the levers of power while the electoral minority is a contributing factor, said Blumenthal: “This crisis is metastasizing, throughout the system over time, so it’s possible that any close election is allegedly false and fraudulent.

Blumenthal said he did not expect the United States to embark on an outright, “section against section” civil war involving fielding armies.

If right-wing militia groups sought to emulate the secessionists of the 1860s and attempted to “take over federal forts and offices by force,” he said: “I think you would have every confidence that this would be finished very, very quickly. [given] a very strong and firm sense at the top of the US military of its constitutional and non-political role.

“… But given the proliferation of guns, there could be a number of seemingly random acts of violence coming from these organized militias, who are truly vigilantes and with partisan agendas, and we haven’t gone into it. this phase.

“The real nightmare would be this kind of low-intensity conflict.”

Members of the Oath Keepers, a far-right group, on the Eastern Front of the U.S. Capitol on January 6. Photography: Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

Among academics, Walter is not alone in diagnosing serious problems with American democracy. In November, Sweden-based think tank International IDEA added the United States to a list of “backward” democracies, thanks to “visible deterioration” it dated back to 2019.

He also identified “a historic turning point … in 2020-21 when former President Donald Trump questioned the legitimacy of the 2020 election results.”

The polls revealed similar concerns and warnings. In November, the Public Religion Research Institute asked voters if they agreed with a statement: “Because things have gotten so far away, true American patriots may have to resort to violence to save our country.”

The poll find that 18% of respondents agreed. Among Republicans, however, the figure was 30%.

On Twitter, Walter thanked The Post for covering his book. Her too noted: “I wish I had better news for the world but I couldn’t stay silent knowing what I know.”



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Revel in the joys of books and reading at a Baghdad Book Fair https://harpmaker.net/revel-in-the-joys-of-books-and-reading-at-a-baghdad-book-fair/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 17:00:12 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/revel-in-the-joys-of-books-and-reading-at-a-baghdad-book-fair/ BAGHDAD – Protesters in Baghdad are staging a sit-in demanding that US troops leave Iraq. Counterterrorism troops patrol the streets. A federal court is wondering whether to certify the results of parliamentary elections two months ago. But at the Baghdad International Fair grounds, hardly anyone cares about all of this. Inside is the Baghdad International […]]]>

BAGHDAD – Protesters in Baghdad are staging a sit-in demanding that US troops leave Iraq. Counterterrorism troops patrol the streets. A federal court is wondering whether to certify the results of parliamentary elections two months ago.

But at the Baghdad International Fair grounds, hardly anyone cares about all of this.

Inside is the Baghdad International Book Fair. It’s not even the biggest book fair of the same name that the Iraqi government has sponsored for decades. But it’s still a book fair.

There, patrons relish the chance to browse the aisles of paperbacks and hard covers stacked on tables in pavilions in different countries. Pose for selfies in front of the fake volumes glued together and arranged to spell the word “book.” To revel in what for many Iraqis is the true enduring character of Baghdad, far from political turmoil and security concerns.

“There is a big divide between the street people and the political elite,” said Maysoon al-Demluji, a former vice minister of culture who was visiting the fair. “People on the street don’t really care about what’s going on in politics. “

Ms Demluji, an architect, described a mini-renaissance of Baghdad’s culture fostered by improved security and young people eager to connect with the world.

“New generations are exposed to ideas that were denied to previous generations,” she said. “There is so much going on here. “

At the fashionable Mansour district fairgrounds, some of the pavilions normally used for trade shows have been transformed to look like old Baghdad. Buses disgorge children in school uniforms on school trips. Groups of friends sit in the winter sun and drink Arabic coffee and espresso in outdoor cafes.

Inside, the pavilions showcase offerings from printing houses from the Arab world and beyond. Iranian publisher presents luxurious tabletop books on the country’s cultural wonders.

At the booth of a Kuwaiti publishing house, Zainab al-Joori, a psychiatrist, paid for books on ancient Mesopotamia and a novel by Robert Louis Stevenson translated into Arabic. Most of the books at the booth were paperbacks.

“Reading is my therapy,” said Dr Joori, 30, who works in a mental hospital.

Paperbacks fall far behind the feel and smell of old books that Dr. Joori loves the most. Yet she has been eagerly awaiting the book fair for months.

“Just visiting this place is satisfying even though I don’t buy any books,” she said.

Iraqis love books. “Cairo writes, Beirut publishes and Baghdad reads,” says an old adage.

In the 90s, my first reporting missions in Baghdad were in a closed country. It was Saddam Hussein’s Iraq – difficult to access and, once there, difficult and dangerous to explore below the surface.

The United States had just driven Saddam’s forces out of Kuwait, and the United Nations had imposed sweeping trade sanctions on Iraq. In a once rich country, the shock of sudden poverty has hardened the city and its people.

But in those rare glimpses behind the closed doors of people’s houses, there were often books – in some houses beautiful built-in wooden shelves, all read, and almost every book treated by its owner like an old friend.

Iraqis are proud of their ancient heritage as heirs to the world’s earliest known civilizations, along the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The oldest known form of writing, the cuneiform symbols inscribed in clay, emerged in southern Iraq over 5,000 years ago.

In the 9th century AD in Baghdad – at the time the largest city in the world – from translators to Bayt al Hikma, or House of Knowledge, a huge library and an intellectual center, were responsible for translating all existing important works into Arabic and fostering intellectual debate. Scholars from all over the Abbasid Empire, stretching from Central Asia to North Africa, visited the institution, engaging in research and promoting scientific progress.

Twelve centuries later, in al-Mutanabi Street, the love for books and ideas continues in the Friday market where vendors display second-hand books for sale on the sidewalk in a tradition that is the beating heart of the city. traditional cultural life of Baghdad.

At the Baghdad Book Fair, two booksellers sat under string lights draped from the ceiling, near a huge inflatable plastic snow globe with Santa inside.

Hisham Nazar, 24, has a degree in finance and banking but works, by choice, at the Cemetery of Books publishing house. On the shelves of the publisher’s offerings at the fair is a figure “American Nietzsche”, on the German philosopher’s impact on the United States.

Mr. Nazar, 24, said Nietzsche the “second greatest spirit in the history of mankind”. The first, according to him, is Leonardo da Vinci.

He said the publisher’s best-selling books were by Iraqi writer Burhan Shawi, who wrote a nine-part series of novels, including “The Baghdad Morgue,” against a backdrop of violence in Baghdad, according to him. -war. Iraq’s turbulent and violent history since the US invasion in 2003 has provided rich fodder for writers.

“The war gave the Iraqis a lot of material,” said psychiatrist Dr Joori, adding that most of the fair’s patrons were young people.

In Iraq’s worst times, books have proven to be a comfort.

When the Islamic State took control of parts of Iraq in 2014 and declared the city of Mosul the capital of its caliphate, life as Iraqis knew it in the country’s second largest city practically fell apart. stopped. Almost all books have been banned, as well as music. Women were mostly confined to their homes. During the almost three years that ISIS occupied the city, many people stayed in their homes and read in secret.

During the first reading festival after Mosul was liberated from ISIS, thousands of locals came to the event in a park once used to train child combatants. Families with children, old people, young people – all are hungry to be able to read openly again.

Mr. Nazar, the Baghdad Fair bookseller, said that while many people now read digital books, he and many others prefer to hold books in their hands.

“When you open a paper book, it’s like stepping into the writer’s journey,” he said. “A paper book has the soul of the writer.


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Tyler Stovall, renowned professor of history and former dean of the humanities, dies at 67 https://harpmaker.net/tyler-stovall-renowned-professor-of-history-and-former-dean-of-the-humanities-dies-at-67/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 22:41:54 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/tyler-stovall-renowned-professor-of-history-and-former-dean-of-the-humanities-dies-at-67/ Tyler Stovall, renowned historian, professor and former dean of the humanities at UC Santa Cruz, died on December 10, 2021 at his New York home. He was 67 years old. Stovall is the author of 10 books and various articles on the history of modern France, with an emphasis on work, colonialism, race, with his […]]]>

Tyler Stovall, renowned historian, professor and former dean of the humanities at UC Santa Cruz, died on December 10, 2021 at his New York home. He was 67 years old.

Stovall is the author of 10 books and various articles on the history of modern France, with an emphasis on work, colonialism, race, with his latest—White Freedom: The Racial History of an Idea—published in early 2021. Stovall was a faculty member in the Humanities Division at UC Santa Cruz for 13 years, including three years as Chairman of the History Department and Rector of Stevenson College. His tenure as Dean of Humanities at UC Santa Cruz lasted from 2014 to 2020.

“An insightful scholar and author dedicated to social justice and the advancement of minority scholars, Tyler has touched the lives of countless students, faculty and staff during his nearly two decades on our campus,” Chancellor Cynthia Larive, Campus President and Executive Vice Chancellor Lori Kletzer said in a joint campus post, “We knew Tyler as a skilled educator and as a caring, generous and kind colleague. He will be sorely missed. ”

In addition to his time at UC Santa Cruz, Stovall’s long and distinguished career has led him to serve as President of the American Historical Association and Visiting Professor at the University of French Polynesia in Tahiti, as well as to occupy teaching positions at Ohio State University and as Professor of French History and Dean of the Undergraduate Division of the College of Letters and Sciences at UC Berkeley. At the time of his death, Stovall was Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Fordham University in New York.

“A man of deep conviction and keen insight, Tyler was a great mind, a big heart, and a kind and generous colleague,” Joseph M. McShane, SJ, president of Fordham University, said in a statement. “He arrived at Fordham in July 2020 and, during his all too brief tenure, brought tremendous acumen, energy and intellectual seriousness to the role. He was an experienced and knowledgeable administrator, as well as a highly regarded historian and public intellectual with a staunch commitment to social justice and the advancement of minority academics.

Stovall was among the first African Americans in the United States to come to prominence as an expert on European history, and he provided encouragement and mentorship to other minority academics. He has spoken eloquently throughout his career about the importance and value of diversity, noting that while people often talk about diversity as being important to marginalized communities, it is something that benefits all of us. “Being exposed to people from different backgrounds, being able to interact with people with different experiences is something we all learn from and it improves all of our lives,” he said in a short video on excellence and diversity produced by Fordham University earlier. This year.

Stovall was born September 4, 1954 in Gallipolis, Ohio, to parents Tyler and Barbara Stovall. Her father was a child psychologist and her mother ran the South Side Settlement House, a community center in Columbus, Ohio. Both of Stovall’s parents were active in the growing civil rights movement, with activists and guests from their local NAACP chapter regularly visiting their home. Their efforts inspired Stovall’s own political activism, including joining a race relations club at his public high school and giving his first public speech against the Vietnam War at the age of 18.

Stovall attended Harvard, graduating cum laude with a degree in history. He continued to participate in anti-war and anti-racist protests and was, at one point, assaulted in a public street with acid sprayed on his face. Fortunately, this did not cause any physical damage. He moved from Harvard to graduate school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he reduced his interest in European history to modern French history under the tutelage of renowned scholar Harvey Goldberg.

Stovall quickly won awards and grants that allowed him to continue his research into the working-class neighborhoods of the Paris suburbs, particularly the work done to turn citizens frustrated with sanitation and water systems into a constituency base. dynamic. This resulted in his 1984 thesis, “The Urbanization of Bobigny,” which was eventually revised and published in book form under the title The rise of the Parisian red belt by the University of California Press in 1990.

After earning his doctorate in modern European / French history in 1984, Stovall continued his research for his thesis, earning a scholarship that took him to UC Berkeley. It was there that he met Denise Herd, an academic colleague whom he married in 1988. In the same year, Stovall held a position in the history department at UC Santa Cruz where his classes focused on breed. and ethnicity in Europe and modern France.

In 1996, Stovall caused a sensation with the publication of his book Paris Noir: African Americans in the City of Light, a work that has explored the lives of many black American writers, artists and performers whose work flourished after emigrating to France in the 20th century. The book has been hailed as “an engaging chronicle of African American life in Paris since the dawn of the jazz era”, by Kirkus Reviews. The book also served as an essential source for Myth of a color blind France, a 2020 documentary film for which Stovall was interviewed.

His most recent book White Freedom: The Racial History of an Idea has earned Stovall even more attention and praise. Many critics have linked the theme of the book, which, as Stovall writes, “to its extreme freedom can be and historically has been a racist ideology”, with the January 6 attack on the US capital. “White freedom has a lot to tell us… about how racism has been built into so many of our systems and institutions, and how what we see as freedom is not really freedom, ”Brock Kingsley wrote in a article written for Chicago Book Review.

“For me, Tyler must be remembered as an academic who firmly believed that writing and teaching history was a political act,” said Michael Vann, professor of history and Asian studies. at California State University, Sacramento, who studied under Stovall for his Doctorate at UC Santa Cruz. “Throughout his long and dynamic career, Tyler has used his ground-breaking research, critical analysis and engaging lectures as weapons in the fight for social justice. Despite studying some of the worst aspects of human behavior, he has always remained optimistic and argued that a better world is possible and that education is central to that goal. I am heartbroken to lose him as a friend and mentor, but also as a role model in our unfinished struggles.

In addition to his wife, Denise Herd, Tyler Stovall is survived by their son, Justin; and a sister, Leslie Stovall. Information on services will be provided when available.


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America has a new superhero and it’s a book titled 2021 American Ideologies Reimagined by Jameel L. Radford https://harpmaker.net/america-has-a-new-superhero-and-its-a-book-titled-2021-american-ideologies-reimagined-by-jameel-l-radford/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 15:11:00 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/america-has-a-new-superhero-and-its-a-book-titled-2021-american-ideologies-reimagined-by-jameel-l-radford/ Front cover Detention bar invention – Humane way of holding and restraining on the ground and in the air Digicational SmartBook – Patent pending, innovative new learning console that replaces textbooks and instructional books and enables students to have virtual classrooms and classmates from all over the world. This is the only book students will […]]]>

Front cover

The image shows the innovative new invention of the patent pending grab bar.  Two illustrations show usage applications which include: attached to the rear of law enforcement vehicles eliminating the need for ground stops, a

Detention bar invention – Humane way of holding and restraining on the ground and in the air

The image is an illustration of the Digicational SmartBook, an innovative new learning console with 4 interactive screens that share some similarities with tablets, but the 4 screens are connected to provide 7th grade students in College with digita

Digicational SmartBook – Patent pending, innovative new learning console that replaces textbooks and instructional books and enables students to have virtual classrooms and classmates from all over the world. This is the only book students will need from 7t

The newest American superhero, the book “2021 American Ideologies Reimagined” has been officially published.

Tomorrow has come early, are you ready? “

– Jameel L. Radford

GARFIELD HTS, OHIO, UNITED STATES, December 13, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – America has a new superhero, and it’s a book called ‘2021 American ideologies reinvented‘by Jameel L. Radford or AIRAIR has been officially released by the great AMAZON and is committed to:
Counter division, injustice and subjugation with the truth,
 Challenge the methodologies / ideologies of the status quo that produce low returns in humanity,
 Introduce innovative and revolutionary DE&I ideas that unify
Provide invention solutions – patents pending that transform law enforcement arrests and detention procedures by eliminating arrests on the ground and knees to the neck, chest or back, as well as a restraint system applicable to commercial airlines for restraining and detaining unruly passengers in flight called the “Detention bar®
 Overhaul of the struggling education system including methodology, framework and structure with evolved curricula and a technologically advanced learning invention that prepares students for the 21st century and beyond called the ‘Digital SmartBook®

“2021 American Ideologies Reimagined” is a “how-to” book about improving society and building a path to the future. It is a daring journey to examine American ideologies of parenthood, education, employment, humanity, justice and government, meeting and countering perception through truth to challenge the status quo and complacency with innovative and transformational ideas and recommendations.

America’s newest superhero, AIR, wastes no time tackling issues and tackles some of the national challenges that elude elected officials sent to Washington, sending out solutions and recommendations to counter apathy, division, conspiracy, procrastination, circular discussions, injustice, rights and privileges.
 Parental responsibility
Education reform
Humanity (Fairness and Moral Decency)
 Gun control / Accountability
Immigration reform
 Diversity and employment development
Climate change
Responsibility of government
Arrests and detentions on the ground by the police
 Airline passenger safety
 Diversity, equity and inclusion

Readers are invited to embark on a journey of discovery, self-assessment, beliefs and perspectives from chapter to chapter comparing proclamation to practice. The journey begins slowly with a careful examination of shared beliefs in the constructs of human behavior and societal functions with the promise of an intensifying quality of life and stimulating cognitive stimulation throughout the book.

America’s newest superhero provides government, politicians, public and private sector leaders with ideas, recommendations, and solutions that address many of the issues and challenges America faces today, from reform to immigration to diversity, equity and inclusion, and also provides inspiration for American people to have real conversations on the journey to democracy, justice and a nation.

One of humanity’s greatest tools is communication and the 2021 American Ideologies Reimagined book can be a conversation starter to bring people from all walks of life together to open their minds and hearts to the realm of new and innovative possibilities. to develop the republic, strengthen democracy and reinvent a better future marked by prosperity, equity and justice for all. Newest American superhero kicked off the conversations with a letter to President Joe Biden sharing the jail bar news® patent pending, as well as letters to CEOs of automotive manufacturing at Ford, GM / Chevy, Dodge / Chrysler and CEOs of airlines of United Airlines, Delta Airlines, Southwest Airlines and American Airlines. In addition, a letter was sent to the CEOs of Microsoft, Google, Apple and Amazon.com to share the news regarding the Digicational SmartBook.® and opportunities to skip education in the 21st century and beyond.

Buy “2021 American Ideologies Reimagined” today and team up with America’s newest superhero to reinvent a brighter future. Investing in AIR is an investment in America’s future and prosperity, especially when no other body, institution, group, or party is willing or able to tackle volume societal issues with commitment and determination to provide solutions like AIR. AIR will be remembered by history. as America’s priceless, priceless, beyond calculable or evaluable superhero.
Author: Radford, Jameel Lateef

Illustrator: Radford, Jameel Lateef
Drawings by: Radford, Jameel Lateef
ISBN: 978-0-578-32569-9
Publication date: December 2021
Editor: Jameel L Radford
Book Format: Paperback
List Price: $ 99.95

Jameel L. Radford
Individual
+1 216-213-3244
write us here
Visit us on social networks:
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Book: ‘Portuguese Home Cooking’ by Ana Patuleia Ortins – Editor’s note https://harpmaker.net/book-portuguese-home-cooking-by-ana-patuleia-ortins-editors-note/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 22:55:06 +0000 https://harpmaker.net/book-portuguese-home-cooking-by-ana-patuleia-ortins-editors-note/ Posted on December 11, 2021. The Mediterranean diet is renowned for its fresh and vibrant cuisine. In this book, Ana Patuleia Ortins invites you to discover or revisit the comforting peasant cuisine of Portugal, just as vibrant, but distinct from that of its neighbors. Strewn with a life of anecdotes from a passionate cook, Portuguese […]]]>

Posted on December 11, 2021.

The Mediterranean diet is renowned for its fresh and vibrant cuisine. In this book, Ana Patuleia Ortins invites you to discover or revisit the comforting peasant cuisine of Portugal, just as vibrant, but distinct from that of its neighbors. Strewn with a life of anecdotes from a passionate cook, Portuguese home cookingg takes us to an immigrant kitchen where traditional culinary methods have been passed down from father to daughter, shared and refined with the help of family and friends who have watched, chopped and tasted. The recipes in this cookbook are dishes prepared like in Portugal, with proven measures and ingredients and methods fully explained.

With warmth and enthusiasm, Ana Patuleia Ortins shares fresh salads from the garden, hearty embers with wine and garlic, legumes and leafy greens, meat and shellfish dishes, rustic breads and succulent desserts for which Portugal is known. Beautiful photographs of dishes and places will transport you to the picturesque countryside of Portugal, and novices and experienced chefs alike will revel in the culture and cuisine, whether they are nostalgic for the house or discovering it for the sake of it. first time.

“Rich in love and flavor, it’s a staple of any complete cookbook collection… In a delicious tribute to the dishes of the author’s friends and family, Ortins once again looks back on his culinary roots, this time with an even more personal inclination. A first generation Portuguese American, Ortins combines traditional cuisine with modern convenience… ”-Editors Weekly

A beautiful book for those interested in Portuguese gastronomy. It’s not just about cooking with flavor, but with love. – Portuguese hours

“Surprisingly delicious… superb… Ortin’s meticulously assembled collection should be widely praised…. “-The Boston Globe

“There are few good books on Portuguese cuisine, which makes Ortins’ new cookbook particularly welcome … Although the cuisines of Portugal and Spain are often treated together, Portuguese cuisine has its own identity and most libraries will want this job. ” –Library Journal

“The mysteries of Portuguese cuisine have been unlocked… It’s as authentic as it gets on this side of the Atlantic.” –Lynn Daily (MA)

“Authentic Portuguese recipes, prepared like in a Portuguese house.” –Peabody Weekly (MA)

“[D]delicious and perfect for home cooks… This Ortins offer delves into the ingredients and traditions of Portuguese cuisine handed down to the author by his father. The bright and vibrant photography, which is just as likely to portray panoramic coastal views as the food itself, elevates this title beyond a typical cookbook.List of books

“A new cookbook by Ana Patuleia Ortins, a Portuguese-born author based in Massachusetts, is rich in interesting ways… it’s a user-friendly book filled with easy, lively recipes… beautifully photographed by Hiltrud Schulz….” –Montreal Gazette

“Hearty, comforting meals that range from simple soups for a busy weeknight to sumptuous platters for entertaining.” –Latinidad, Best Cookbook of the Year

About the Author

A first-generation descendant of Portuguese immigrants from the Alto Alentejo region in Portugal, Ana Patuleia Ortins grew up with the traditions and traditions linked to the food of her ancestors. She has a Culinary Arts degree and teaches Portuguese cuisine in her own kitchen and at local New England colleges. She is the author of Authentic Portuguese Cuisine.

Book Details

  • Title: Portuguese home cooking
  • Author: Ana Patuleia Ortins
  • Photographer: Hiltrud schulz
  • Publisher: Interlink Books
  • Publication date: November 2, 2021
  • Language: English
  • Hard cover: 304pp

Available@Amazon.com


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